#1
Hey, new member with inexperience trying to get some questions answered. I understand vocal types, however for instance to be a tenor you have to hit a C5 (eighth fret high e string on guitar). But does this have to be in "chest voice" because from what I have read about head voice on Wikipedia it seems that every male transitions into head voice regardless of vocal type at Eb4 or E4. Which is where I break too. I have a decent head voice but I think the point of the vocal types is to not classify you by range but the timbre you have on certain notes. Such as tenors hit high notes fuller than baritones but low notes come a lot more thinned. Am I right on this?

Thanks for your time I am very confused right now and I have read around on the forums but couldn't find anything to answer my specific questions?

Best Regards
Jamming345
#2
Using your example, a tenor should be able to hit that tenor C in what I prefer to call "full voice." (I don't like the distinguishing of chest voice / head voice, as they are a little misleading, and often applied incorrectly)

Put most simply, you should NOT be in falsetto when checking your range.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#3
Falsetto and Mix-Register dont really count.
And when referring to the "mix-register" this way, its the controlled register.
It's almost impossible to sing your highest "full voice", as most people automatically blend into their mix at higher notes.

To determine a vocal type is really a pain in the ass, and i find it very tough. Theres degrees of everything, and that's why the types are blending together, and it's very hard to distinguish them from eachother.
I've found out by experience that if you listen to the tone, there might be some clues to find about a persons vocal type. People who are able to hit high notes aren't necessarily tenors, they can easily be baritones.
#4
Well yes , but I don't think it's possible for a male to hit tenor C in chest voice according to Wikipedia which references a book on the subject all men go into mixed/head/falsetto whatever at E4. It may sound like chest voice but at that point everything resonates in the head.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Head_voice

If you disagree can I please have a link to a High C in full voice. I've listened to Paul McCartney and Freddie Mercury Vocal Range videos (two Tenors as far as I know) to find they use a very light pitch to hit it or just scream. Sorry but I just don't get it.
#5
This is why I have a problem with these terminologies.

See, if you think of chest voice as a woofer and head voice as a tweeter, it becomes easy to see. Play music back without the tweeter and it doesn't sound right. It sounds all muffled and blurry. Play back music through just the tweeter and it sounds all tinny and squawky. You always want a mix of both. For lower notes, you might be 80% chest resonance and 20% head resonance, but there is a mix of the two. For high notes... vice-versa.

So, for me, "full voice" refers to a good, strong, resonant, clear tone produced with a mixture of chest and head resonance.

By comparison, falsetto is entirely head resonance. It *sounds* like the tweeter without the woofer too.

As far as men singing high tenor C... well, any true tenor should be able to do so. Bruce Dickenson is my favourite example of a rock singer who can nail the tenor C and even the D above that. In "Run to the Hills" in the chorus... where he sings "run for your li--i--ife"... on the word "for" he gets up to the D. Compare this to the "life" at the *very* end of the song, where he goes up to the G above that, but it is in falsetto.

Other tenor C's... some of these are better than others, but a lot of these singers just NAIL it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BZMQKVH0BtA

The reason it is harder to find examples of this high C is that, statistically, only one trained singer out of ten is a tenor. Of the other nine, one is a bass and eight are baritones. Of those one in ten tenors, some of them are more convincing than others at the top of their range.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
I'm not a fan of those labels, anyway. I might be able to reach the high C on a good day, but I'm always above the standard Baritone range. I don't really understand it.

EDIT: Er, I'm more of a baritone with a large tenor extension.
Last edited by Cowless at Aug 9, 2011,
#8
^ or...

*a "lyric baritone" - a baritone with an extended and strong upper range. Used primarily as a complement to a baritone who demonstrates strength and range.

*a "pop tenor" - though depending on who uses the term, it could be seen as derisive, but it refers to a male who can sing up to the A or so quite easily, but might not be able to hit the tenor C. Pop music *tends* to be not as demanding on a singer's range, hence the term.

*a "choral tenor" - similar to above, but may be seen as more condescending than derisive. In choral music, there are often tenor parts that top out around the A or Bb - usually a supporting tenor line, while the "tenor 1" may *occasionally* go up to the tenor C in choral music.

These all apply to me, as I am technically a baritone, but can sing pretty reliably up to a strong A, and depending on the context, up to a Bb. I've been known to hit a B, but I'd hate to make any bets on it on any given day. Never a C. (well, except falsetto...which my falsetto is awful....)

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#9
I guess the first one would be me. I hope. Every once in a while I get a high C in there, but it's not consistent or clear enough for me to be a true tenor. It takes an extreme amount of volume and energy to hit it even when I do, so I don't think I would use it. It's probably a bit too off.

On an unrelated note, do you happen to know what effects the ending of puberty has on an already changed voice? My falsetto comes and goes, and it makes me frustrated.
#10
Keep in mind that a beginner tenor would find the C5 just as difficult as a beginner. I couldn't even hit a G4 at the very start because I had no idea how to go into head voice.