#1
Hey guys
I've been revisiting intervals lately because i realized i didn't understand them as well as I should. I was wondering what the best way to identify specific intervals is. Is it counting out the number of steps in your head, or is there an easier way? Thanks =D!
EDIT: Agh sorry really stupid mistake on my part, I don't mean ear training, I mean identifying on staff or on guitar. My bad
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Last edited by nirvanagrunge13 at Aug 7, 2011,
#2
Are we talking about hearing them or identifying them on the fretboard?
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#3
solfeggio.
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#4
Quote by nirvanagrunge13
Hey guys
I've been revisiting intervals lately because i realized i didn't understand them as well as I should. I was wondering what the best way to identify specific intervals is. Is it counting out the number of steps in your head, or is there an easier way? Thanks =D!


Try to find songs to associate specific intervals with. For example, Somewhere Over The Rainbow starts with an octave leap. The theme from Star Wars starts with a fifth. The Entertainer is a minor sixth.


I'm sure there is a list online somewhere for the rest of the intervals, you should look it up. Remember to practice both descending and ascending. The best way to practice, imo, is to sit at a piano (or guitar, i suppose) and close your eyes and play two random notes with your eye closed, and then try to figure out the interval you played.


EDIT: If you're talking about playing intervals on guitar, not hearing them and recognizing what interval it is, then ignore my post. You should still be able to hear two notes and tell what interval it is though.
Last edited by MeGaDeth2314 at Aug 7, 2011,
#5
Sorry guys, meant on staff and fretboard not by ear
Rock on or die

Guitarist 5 years, Had purpose in life 5 years

Quote by angusfan16
My name is NOT Anus Fan!
#6
If you know your scales, think of the bottom note as the root or tonic.

C to D- major second
C to E- major third
C to F- perfect fourth
C to G- perfect fifth
C to A- major sixth
C to B- major seventh

Of course this only applies if C is the root.

Also
1 interval smaller then a major interval is minor
1 interval smaller then a perfect interval is diminished
1 interval larger then a perfect interval is augmented

So if the two notes are C and G# it is an augmented fifth, because C to G is a perfect fifth and C to G# is one interval larger.

Or if you're more comfortable with the top note being the root, know your conversions.

major becomes minor and vice versa
perfect stays perfect
augmented becomes diminished and vice versa

Also, the two numbers have to add up to 9, so a major second (C to D) second coverts to a minor seventh (D to C).

If any of that didn't make sense, just ask me to clearify. I've known for this a while so it just makes sense to me, not so much when I started out.
#7
solfege aka sing them a lot until you can sing them from memory perfectly up or down everytime without thinking about it
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