#4
You play it over and over again and again and again until you memorize or eventually automatize it. Shredders don't remember single notes, they remember licks and phrases.

To play like the guy in the video you will need years of practice. BTW many good musicians can't play like that.

Being a musician is not only about playing fast and extraordinary playing skills, to me it's more about writing something that is creative and sounds good.
Not saying you can't do both, but to me many shredders just wank meaningless notes over and over to show off how fast they can play. Actually I've seen people sweeping and down the fretboard like mad, but when they play slowly their playing becomes insecure and simply bad sounding.

Tell your parents that being a musician is more than playing complicated and/or fast stuff, it's about being creative and about creating something that's worth listening to.
#5
Quote by JesusCrisp
You play it over and over again and again and again until you memorize or eventually automatize it. Shredders don't remember single notes, they remember licks and phrases.

To play like the guy in the video you will need years of practice. BTW many good musicians can't play like that.

Being a musician is not only about playing fast and extraordinary playing skills, to me it's more about writing something that is creative and sounds good.
Not saying you can't do both, but to me many shredders just wank meaningless notes over and over to show off how fast they can play. Actually I've seen people sweeping and down the fretboard like mad, but when they play slowly their playing becomes insecure and simply bad sounding.

Tell your parents that being a musician is more than playing complicated and/or fast stuff, it's about being creative and about creating something that's worth listening to.


Thanks man! So could I go up to be my parents and be like "I can create my own music and try to succeed rather then spend countless number of hours playing the same cover over and over again until I get it?"
#6
Quote by ickypop
Thanks man! So could I go up to be my parents and be like "I can create my own music and try to succeed rather then spend countless number of hours playing the same cover over and over again until I get it?"

Well, if you have the skills and knowledge about music as well as the creativity to write good songs, riffs, solos etc., yes.
Other than that playing covers doesn't hurt, challenging yourself with more difficult songs can make you a better guitar player for sure, but if you don't care about let's say learning Steve Vai's "For the Love of God" note for note, there's no reason to do it.
#7
How long do you think he spent on that? I'll wager he didn't dream it up in a day. Michael Angelo Batio said of his instrumental piece No Boundaries that it took him two years to write it, work it out and get so he could play it from beginning to end. A lot of time and effort goes into making it look that easy.
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Last edited by FatalGear41 at Aug 8, 2011,
#8
umm.. dude if you write the song then chances are you will remember how to play it. learning others music isn't the same as composing your own. when i'm sitting around just playing i come up with rifs or little leads all the time. if i really like something i'll play it over again a few times until i can remember it all and play it smoothly. it then goes into the riff bank. as i come up with ideas for songs i may take something i came up with years ago because it fits. point being that often songs (especially shred ones) tend to be made of ideas that you've been playing for a while so of course you remember them.
#9
What Jesus said about memorizing licks is very true. Musicians who play without sheet music are just mixing up lots of little things in their bags of tricks and not trying to nail the original. Listen to a career's worth of live bootlegs and you'll start hearing the same little licks popping up all over the place. And live solos tend to be slower and less complicated than the studio versions. Musicians also take cues from each other to keep going when they get stuck. If you forget what to play just throw any riff or lick on top of the bass groove and the crowd will think you're showing off until you get your own groove back.

And don't forget that singers just cheat, they stick teleprompters all over the place. I saw Prince last year and he has more teleprompters than Ozzy!
#10
Because it's easier to play like that then standing up.
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#11
Quote by ickypop
How are musicians such as: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zmhY20ZZkY&playnext=1&list=PL2121CFF9B608452E

able to sit down and remember how to play their own stuff? I mean I have put in countless hours trying to learn songs. My parents say I can never be a good musician if I can't sit down and play stuff like this!

your parents are asshats.

ask them how kieth richards ever made it big.

man i hope you were adopted, for your sake.

good luck, practice at least a half hour a day, every day if possible. jam with everyone you can, especially people that are better than you. all the best.
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#12
It's worth doing covers, especially before you can really compose well. Do it piece by piece, since the majority of songs will only have 5-10 sections repeated (Intro, verse, pre-chorus, chorus, bridge, maybe a couple of solos, outro in various configurations). Do the intro till you can do it pretty well, then do the second part (usually verse or chorus) till you know it pretty well, put them together, do the next bit till you know it well, add it onto the rest, then there's a fair chance that the next bit is just the second and third sections again, so that's easy and then you carry on like that. It's not as difficult as it might seem. With more complex solos or songs without a sectioned structure, do the same thing except on a bar-by-bar level. If you do it like that, it's not difficult to remember. Professional musicians aren't elephants or anything, they just remember what to do because they've practiced it (and written it, in most cases). If you're doing something you know but have forgotten, playing it through with the written music will bring it back pretty quickly.

If you focus on bits you have trouble with and make sure you put together what you know from a song, it's unlikely to take more than a couple weeks to learn if you practice regularly.
Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Aug 8, 2011,
#13
Quote by gregs1020
your parents are asshats.

ask them how kieth richards ever made it big.

man i hope you were adopted, for your sake.

good luck, practice at least a half hour a day, every day if possible. jam with everyone you can, especially people that are better than you. all the best.

half an hour?


i practice for 6 and play 2.... :/
#14
Quote by 00_hns_00
half an hour?


i practice for 6 and play 2.... :/

good for you.

but to build some muscle memory that's what it takes.

and i said at least a half hour a day. not just a half our a day, but if that's all you can, it's worth doing.

some people can't manage that much, but good for you.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#15
Quote by 00_hns_00
half an hour?


i practice for 6 and play 2.... :/



Really? How good are you for that 8 hours of playing a day...
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#16
I play the piano, and when I want to learn a tune, it isn't so much the song as the hand movements that I learn. I mean, I could play Super Trouper on the desk in front of me, or at least I could make the hand movements, because it's those that I learn rather than the melody. When I look at a piece of music, I don't hear the tune playing in my head or anything like that. To me, the sheet simply tells me how to move my hands, and then it's up to me to learn the tune and play it so much and so fast that a few weeks later, it's ingrained in my hands the same way that riding a bicycle or typing on this keyboard is. And like riding a bicycle, you never completely forget how to play a tune. Sure, if you haven't played it for years then you'll be a bit lost to start off with, but the song is still tucked away in your brain somewhere.

Playing with emotion is a different thing. Once I've learnt a tune, I go about adding in the dynamics where I'm supposed to. You know, louder here, quieter there, faster again here. By this point I've developed a kind of feel for the song and I can throw in simple improvisations and licks along the way. At the end of the day, it's my interpretation and I'll do what I want with it.

Playing the guitar is a slightly different thing to me. It's still the hand movements that I learn, but I find it easier to improvise and mess around with tunes on a guitar. It's a different kind of instrument and it feels different to make music on. The principles of playing music on a piano still shine through though.

However, true improvisation is a totally different skill. Anyone can throw together a few chords, but I take my hat off to people like BB King. It takes real skill to express yourself like that and improvise melodically.
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#17
Quote by 00_hns_00
half an hour?


i practice for 6 and play 2.... :/

Pfffft that's it?! I practice for 26 and play for 8....
#18
covers suck. Seriously... just one dude talkin, but the reason I started playing was to create something new. Now its a load of fun to jam on a tune, and when I am decent enough to play some gigs (close after 2 years and a lot of practice) I will certainly play songs so I will need to memorize some lyrics, but the FUN and COOLNESS is taking a song and playing it your way.

Did you know Hey Joe isnt a Hendrix tune? How about the way Slash tears up Knockin on Heavans door? Like Social Distortion's take on Ring of Fire?

Your parents sound like my wife... knows nothing about music and what makes it great to play. Do it for yourself man!
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#19
Quote by fishmike
covers suck. Seriously... just one dude talkin, but the reason I started playing was to create something new. Now its a load of fun to jam on a tune, and when I am decent enough to play some gigs (close after 2 years and a lot of practice) I will certainly play songs so I will need to memorize some lyrics, but the FUN and COOLNESS is taking a song and playing it your way.

Did you know Hey Joe isnt a Hendrix tune? How about the way Slash tears up Knockin on Heavans door? Like Social Distortion's take on Ring of Fire?

Your parents sound like my wife... knows nothing about music and what makes it great to play. Do it for yourself man!


although i agree with you for the most part there is a bit of reality that you missed. most people that go to clubs to hear cover bands want to hear the song the way they know it. doing a cover and making it your own is much easier said than done.
#20
Quote by monwobobbo
although i agree with you for the most part there is a bit of reality that you missed. most people that go to clubs to hear cover bands want to hear the song the way they know it. doing a cover and making it your own is much easier said than done.

and depending on how drunk they are, they may not even notice.

others may assume you don't know how to play it correctly, and think you suck.

so you have to be "close enough" which is such a variable there is no way to quantify what is or isn't.

that said, i don't take too many liberties with covers. i shoot for the best i can do and hope it's close enough lol.
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#21
I don't think anyone has mentioned it yet, but what he's playing is most likely not as hard as it sounds - it sounds very complex and deep because he's using a ****ton of effects. Sounds like delay, reverb, and either a harmonizer or there's a prerecorded guitar in the backing track.

Not saying that it's easy or anything like that, but just something to point out. I used to play completely dry, no FX at all, and then when I started playing around with delay and reverb, I realized how manipulative it is, and how it has potential to make the simplest licks sound huge and professional.
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#22
Quote by gregs1020
and depending on how drunk they are, they may not even notice.

others may assume you don't know how to play it correctly, and think you suck.

so you have to be "close enough" which is such a variable there is no way to quantify what is or isn't.

that said, i don't take too many liberties with covers. i shoot for the best i can do and hope it's close enough lol.



Not to mention learning covers is the best way to, In my opinion, to learn new techniques you never knew existed before.

Say you learn a more progressive metal song, then after that go for a simpler song in which you learn about a chord and a progression you never knew about before hand. which the more this happens the more diverse of a musician you become and it will better your writing in the future.

not to mention you now have a huge arsenal of songs to play for people, which may get you places.
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#23
Quote by Sinister Waffle
not to mention you now have a huge arsenal of songs to play for people, which may get you laid.

exactly!
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#24
Best thing to do is completely IGNORE your parents and go your own way. Learn what you want, write your own stuff and don't let any overly-opinionated morons tell you how good of a musician you're going to be. Only YOU can decide how good you want to be and what music you want to play. It all takes time. What, are they expecting you to be Steve Vai overnight? Sheesh!
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#26
Quote by JesusCrisp
You play it over and over again and again and again until you memorize or eventually automatize it. Shredders don't remember single notes, they remember licks and phrases.

To play like the guy in the video you will need years of practice. BTW many good musicians can't play like that.

Being a musician is not only about playing fast and extraordinary playing skills, to me it's more about writing something that is creative and sounds good.
Not saying you can't do both, but to me many shredders just wank meaningless notes over and over to show off how fast they can play. Actually I've seen people sweeping and down the fretboard like mad, but when they play slowly their playing becomes insecure and simply bad sounding.

Tell your parents that being a musician is more than playing complicated and/or fast stuff, it's about being creative and about creating something that's worth listening to.


Boom.