#1
Here in the US, there is a stereotype of NASCAR fans. Rednecks and hillbillies that have huge trucks, speak with a southern accent, etc.

I'm wondering if there is something similar in Europe. Is there a stereotype of race fans in Europe. I am not familiar with the kinds of car races that are popular in Europe (Grand Prix, long distance, rally car, indy car?) so I can't ask about one specifically.
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#4
I'm guessing it's the same as here where there are guys with Japanese imports who like to drift and drag race

Or maybe they replace the mufflers with coffee cans and think they gained 100hp on their Civics.
#5
Quote by metaldud536
I'm guessing it's the same as here where there are guys with Japanese imports who like to drift and drag race

Or maybe they replace the mufflers with coffee cans and think they gained 100hp on their Civics.

no we have them too but they're not the stereotypical race fan. They're usually just dickheads.

the motorsports fan stereotype is basically just a nerdy anorak who wears team branded shirts etc.
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#6
I'm American and I far prefer LeMans and other exotic car races over NASCAR. Much more interesting cars and technologies, different courses, different crashes and drivers who aren't like Ricky Bobby.

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Damn... now I want to play Project Gotham Racing or GRID now.
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That's exactly what I've been trying to say.

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#7
They don't really get much negative publicity at all. Their jackets are cool as fuk.
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