#1
When using a guitar live, is there a way I can split the signal and send one signal to a left speaker and the other to the right one, and then add separate effect to each channel? Thanks in advance for responses.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#2
Quote by Slapp62
When using a guitar live, is there a way I can split the signal and send one signal to a left speaker and the other to the right one, and then add separate effect to each channel? Thanks in advance for responses.

Do you mean after the guitar has passed through an amplifier or before?
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#3

Black is the shielding/ground of the cable red and blue are the signal paths
#4
this might be possible with an aby switcher but those really only work with the signal going from your guitar to the aby box then to effects then to you amp. i use my aby to run two amps simaltaneously. i think tonebone makes a switcher that lets you run two cabinets, that is the only way i could see that working. you would probably need a aby and a tonebone for what your talking about.

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#5
If you mean before an amp, you can just use an ABY switcher.
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#6
Quote by tobuei

Black is the shielding/ground of the cable red and blue are the signal paths

Impedance would be wrong; signal would be weaker/half the output; guitar jacks are mono, not stereo (though I presume you were just too lazy to find mono jacks); Splitting a wire to send through two outer wires isn't actually that easy...

Just some of the flaws in your diagram/plan.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Aug 7, 2011,
#7
i mean after an amp, in the live mixer. sorry about that.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#8
Yes it's possible, but the vast majority of venues will be running in mono. There are very very few professional systems out there that run stereo. Really, only low end consumer level PAs are run stereo. If that's what you're using then yes, you can split it. Besides using a splitter, a DI box will work.
#9
whats the advantages of them running in mono?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#10
Quote by Slapp62
whats the advantages of them running in mono?

People on the left side will hear everything; people on the right side will hear everything. I know of venues that do run in stereo for some things (but only slight width, definitely no hard panning) but I think that's more down to the sound guy entertaining himself with small alterations to make the sound better at the FOH position.

In short, it's because if you panned one guitar hard left, the people on the right would hear a massive imbalance with the one on the right etc. and FOH engineering is about getting the best, most consistent sound for as much of the venue as possible.
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#11
Quote by DisarmGoliath
People on the left side will hear everything; people on the right side will hear everything. I know of venues that do run in stereo for some things (but only slight width, definitely no hard panning) but I think that's more down to the sound guy entertaining himself with small alterations to make the sound better at the FOH position.

In short, it's because if you panned one guitar hard left, the people on the right would hear a massive imbalance with the one on the right etc. and FOH engineering is about getting the best, most consistent sound for as much of the venue as possible.


Basically this. It actually gets kind of complicated because you have to consider how the different signals from different speakers are going to interact with each other at any given point in the room and make sure that, at very least, the majority of the room is hearing it how it's supposed to be heard. Most systems are set up in mono and can't be run in stereo without making some major changes with the routing and amps and everything.

Again, if you're using a little two speaker PA, you can do whatever you want. It's really only when you get into the installed systems that you run into the stereo problems.
#12
got it, thanks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.