#1
Lately I've really been working on my speed picking, but I've reached a point where my picking gets a little messy during faster runs.

I always anchor my palm to the bridge of my guitar and Ive heard some people say that you shouldn't anchor your hand on the guitar at all, but when I don't anchor, my picking is horribly sloppy.

So my question is, should I just slow it down and work very hard to increase my accuracy with a metronome or should I change the way I pick?
#2
Everyone has a different playing style. Learn all the riffs and play them slowly over and over again. Slowly increase your speed. Dont try going full speed on your first day learning it.
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#3
Use a metronome. I've had people tell me the same thing about anchoring my palm on the bridge. I've always wondered how they keep the other strings from ringing out without palm muting. To each their own. Anyhow, I've had the same technique for years and have no trouble playing Slayer, S.O.D., or Lamb of God stuff. I don't think you can get too much faster than that. Start slowly with a metronome and work your way up. When you hit a wall, it usually will break down within a few weeks with practice.
#4
i say dont worry about anchoring. if thats how it's comfotable do it. the only issue i've has is that when you change guitars, you'll have to adjust where your hand sits to play like you usually do
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#5
There are many fast guitarists that anchor (ex: Michael Angelo) and many who don't (ex: Shawn Lane). Resting your palm on the bridge shouldn't really be a concern; Paul Gilbert does it, and it clearly works well for him. As long as you're comfortable that way, stick to it. What's more important is to work on synchronizing both hands, as well as proper muting. Use a metronome and begin at a speed you're comfortable with. Also, experiment with different tones, and try other picks, the Dunlop Jazz III is a common choice among shredders, so give it a shot. Those issues are less important than proper practice, but they help.
#6
Quote by axmill
Lately I've really been working on my speed picking, but I've reached a point where my picking gets a little messy during faster runs.

I always anchor my palm to the bridge of my guitar and Ive heard some people say that you shouldn't anchor your hand on the guitar at all, but when I don't anchor, my picking is horribly sloppy.

So my question is, should I just slow it down and work very hard to increase my accuracy with a metronome or should I change the way I pick?



Anchoring is when you have fingers resting underneath the strings like alexi laiho, john petrucci etc. Resting your Palm on your bridge isnt anchoring tbh.

And yeah you said it
#7
So my question is, should I just slow it down and work very hard to increase my accuracy with a metronome or should I change the way I pick?


Probably, both - if you're pressing into the bridge that's definitely bad. If your hand is just touching it and it's free to move, then it's not the problem.
#8
I was lucky enough once apon a time to attend a clinic held by mr "one-million-notes-per-second" Petrucci.
The most valuable lesson I got out of it was in touch with developing speed:
Play the scale/riff slow. Turn off all effects that may make a bad note sound good (AKA distortion), and play completely clean. Play it again slow so that you can pronounce EVERY note. Play it again. And again. Might help to repeat one or two hundred times more. When you are satisfied by the speed you have developed, add some distortion to 'reward' yourself.

You can't expect to learn speed in one day. Heck it takes years.
Keep at it though, the goal is awesome (and ridiculously fun, too)!!!

Happy practicing ;D
Last edited by monkeh at Aug 8, 2011,