#1
Whenever I change my strings, shortly after, my high E string breaks at the ball end. On the broken end I can see the twists from how it was twisted around the ball. To me, it appears that it is breaking because of the stress on the placed on the string during manufacturing when it is twisted around the ball. It usually happens about a day or two after I restring my guitar, and this is the third time it has happened. The last two times I repaired the string by reattaching the ball, re-twisting and soldering it, and it worked fine afterwards months (I'm pretty lazy about changing strings).

Is there something wrong with my guitar? Or should I just try another brand of strings?

The strings I've been using are Ernie Ball Slinky 0.10-0.46, and my guitar is electric with a licensed floyd rose. The guitar is a Cort performer series from some time in the late 80s early 90s. The whammy bar was not used before it broke, and it has never broken shortly after using the whammy bar. I don't really use it because it goes out of tune. Also, I blocked the tremolo again (non permanently) this time when I was restringing it. I blocked it like how is shown in this video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xkj8p4Z3Rjg

It was not blocked the last time the e string broke in the same way, so I doubt this is the cause.

The only way to string my guitar (starting at the bridge) is to thread it throw the small holes and the balls lock the string in place. I can't imagine any other possible way of stringing the guitar. There are pictures of it in my profile if you want to take a look.

I have made some revisions to this post. The most requested ones (as well as ones I deemed important) are highlighted in bold.
Last edited by kilbie at Aug 10, 2011,
#2
Quote by kilbie
Whenever I change my strings, shortly after, my E string breaks at the ball end. From looking at the broken string, it appears that it is breaking because of the stress on the placed on the string during manufacturing when it is twisted around the ball. It usually happens about a day or two after I restring my guitar, and this is the third time it has happened. The last two times I repaired the string by reattaching the ball, re-twisting and soldering it, and it worked fine afterwards months (I'm pretty lazy about changing strings).

Is there something wrong with my guitar? Or should I just try another brand of strings?

The strings I've been using are Ernie Ball 0.10-0.46, and my guitar is electric.


You don't mention what kind of guitar youre using, if it has trem bar, etc
#3
It would help to know what kind of bridge and trem you're using. Also, is it the low or high E-string?
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#4
Try a different brand.

Thats a manufacturing QC issue. Daddarios used to do it constantly to me. I got in touch with them about it and they sent me a few free packs and they were fine weirdly enough. I use GHS strings now.

You can also try like you said soldering the ball ends before you put them on your guitar.
#5
What brand of strings are you using and what method do you use to put them on?
Guitars: Fender FSR Standard Strat, Squire Affinity Strat, Epiphone Nighthawk
Amps: Vox AC15C1, Roland Cube 15x, Peavey KB-1
Pedals: Digitech RP355, HD500, Joyo AC-Tone, EHX Soul Food
#6
I said the strings were Ernie Ball. It's nice to know that someone else has had a similar problem (beckyjc). I would have thought Ernie ball would have sorted out a manufacturing fault like that. How hard is it for them to test a few of the strings! I can't be so unlucky I only get the bad ones. It would be good to know, though, if there was anything I could do to avoid this happening with other strings.
#8
I've got a licensed Floyd Rose on my Jackson, I'm not sure they'd be different. I can't figure out how you're stringing at all as I don't make use of the ball end at all. Here's what I do -

1. Remove the old string.
2. Insert new string through tuning peg.
3. Insert non-ball end through locking nut and into bridge clamp. Tighten appropriately.
4. Tune to pitch, clamp locking nut.
5. Cut off string at peg.
Quote by fly135
Just because one has tone suck it doesn't mean one's tone sucks.
#9
lol IbanezBossShred, I forgot that. To Dilberto, I think my bridge is significantly different to yours. There is no 'bridge clamp'. There is simply a hole in the bridge and the string threads through the hole and the ball locks it in place, as it is too big to go through the hole. It says 'licensed under floyd rose patent' on it, but it's quite possible that it is a bit unusual.

This guitar is strung in a similar way, although my bridge looks a bit different, the principle is the same.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrLKlJS1wEo

The day before yesterday I just realised that the ball is not actually breaking off rather the string is becoming unwound from where it twists to fasten the ball. I found that the string would detune, and then I would tune it up but it would detune again, and after a few times the string would break free from the bridge, and the ball that secured it would be somewhere on the floor (I still haven't found it, lol).

I also bought a new Dunlop high E string and have had no problems with it so far.
#10
Hey, my friend had a similar problem with his Gibson SG guitar he took it to a music store and they found a problem at the bridge of the guitar which they corrected. And now it works fine again :P