#1
Hello all,

Hope this is the right sub-section of the forum.

I recently won an Epiphone Les Paul Plain top from Sam Ash. STill sounds like a Les Paul, but I'm curious as to how one could Mod an Epiphone Les Paul (although I realize it will never quite sound like its gibson counterpart.....)

I've considered changing pickups....
#2
I'd definitely change the pups and also much of the electronics such as the pots and the capacitors. For pots i'd go with CTK or Alpha and just replace the ceramic cap with a small mylar cap of the same value (0.022uF) (Spraque orange drops are popular). I might also think of replacing the plastic nut, and if the guitar's heavy also replacing the straplocks. Most of this stuff just makes the guitar more comfortable and better to play and makes it last longer... Short of changing the wood, the pups are your best bet for getting better tone.
#4
woah people, first off we don't know the sound he/she wants, and secondly you aren't helping out his confusion.


original poster/thread starter. just pm me if you want to know some of the things you can do to the guitar.
#5
Quote by mattchoignr
You should change Pickups and your bridge and possibly tuners

Do that, the nut, and the electronics, and that's 90% of the difference. Play through some distortion and it'll be hard to tell the difference blind.
#6
Quote by matt154
I'd definitely change the pups and also much of the electronics such as the pots and the capacitors. For pots i'd go with CTK or Alpha and just replace the ceramic cap with a small mylar cap of the same value (0.022uF) (Spraque orange drops are popular). I might also think of replacing the plastic nut, and if the guitar's heavy also replacing the straplocks. Most of this stuff just makes the guitar more comfortable and better to play and makes it last longer... Short of changing the wood, the pups are your best bet for getting better tone.


Hi Matt 154, since I'm completely new to modding guitars (i've always played stock!), what would you say the main differences will be if I replace the pots and capacitors? Is it a matter of durability, or in what way will the sound be improved?

Thanks
#7
Quote by mattchoignr
You should change Pickups and your bridge and possibly tuners



Well, it already has Grovers......

Also, I'm scared that changing the pickups will leave you with pickups that, due to being foreign to the instrument, will cause buzzing and other related problems....
#8
Quote by Legsilver
Hi Matt 154, since I'm completely new to modding guitars (i've always played stock!), what would you say the main differences will be if I replace the pots and capacitors? Is it a matter of durability, or in what way will the sound be improved?

Thanks


The stock epiphone electronics such as pots and switches are crap IMO.
Replace for better durability.
Replacing the caps with the same value of a different brand, may or may not make a difference.

And new pickups, as long as they are installed and setup properly (height etc) should cause no new problems like buzzing.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Aug 8, 2011,
#9
I tend to replace the caps mostly out of hatred for the ceramic ones. I've had plenty chip while making changes to pots and wiring so it's worth getting better ones. Like codemonk said most of the changes are for durability. The pups will give the biggest tone difference. Replacing the nut and bridge tends to affect sustain and also tone slightly.
#10
Quote by Legsilver
Well, it already has Grovers......

Also, I'm scared that changing the pickups will leave you with pickups that, due to being foreign to the instrument, will cause buzzing and other related problems....


That really shouldn't be a concern. I've replaced lots of pups in my career and I've never had a problem with buzzing (that is, when replacing 'buckers with better 'buckers). If you do have a buzz after replacing your stock Epi humbuckers with, say, Seymour Duncans, it is probably be because of the wiring, not the pups themselves. That said, if you wanted to replace the stock pickups with a single-coil, then you would get a buzz. If your project goes badly, and there is a buzz that even a seasoned professional can't fix, I was just get a noise reducer (you can get these at a Sam Ash or Guitar Center). But there really is a very low chance of anything like that happening. So go for it.