#1
Hey guys,
Well, yesterday I restrung my Gibson V and when I went to play it, I noticed that the high e string produces an unwanted feedback, an "echo"/chorus like noise when I play several notes, especially when I play fast. This makes everything I play (right after playing those middle frets that make this wailing noise) unclear, cacophonic...

I checked my tuning, intonation, truss rod, action, etc, anything I can think of, and still the high e produces this noise. Any tips on how I can fix it?

I took off all the old strings at once before putting on the new ones. Can this have made any effect?

Thanks!
Last edited by zuhairreza at Aug 8, 2011,
#3
If your e-string sounds like a sitar, it could be a number of reasons. I could only give you a 100% certain answer if I saw the guitar.

Quite likely it needs a refret. Over time, the contact of the strings on the frets actually wears down the metal. This can cause weird fret buzz noises and other problems.

Your best bet is to take it to a guitar store with a repair department and get their luthier to look at it for you.

Steve
#4
Quote by StevePigott
If your e-string sounds like a sitar, it could be a number of reasons. I could only give you a 100% certain answer if I saw the guitar.

Quite likely it needs a refret. Over time, the contact of the strings on the frets actually wears down the metal. This can cause weird fret buzz noises and other problems.

Your best bet is to take it to a guitar store with a repair department and get their luthier to look at it for you.

Steve



Thanks for the reply.

I just discovered something. Mutiple frets on the the high e, when played together, ONLY sound like a sitar and give that echo like background noise when the other strings are in tune. I just detuned strings 6 through 2, and the high e is perfect. Everything on the high e first string plays fine when the other 5 strings are NOT in tune.

Any ideas what's happening here?
#5
Well, I guess you have two options...

1) Play your next gig with your guitar carefully out of tune to avoid high e-string buzz.

or

2) Take it to a luthier.

Lol, I'd go for number two!

It's pretty tough to diagnose this sort of thing without seeing the instrument, but you can't go wrong getting it looked at by a pro.

Let us know what the guy says,

Steve
#6
Quote by StevePigott
Well, I guess you have two options...

1) Play your next gig with your guitar carefully out of tune to avoid high e-string buzz.

or

2) Take it to a luthier.

Lol, I'd go for number two!

It's pretty tough to diagnose this sort of thing without seeing the instrument, but you can't go wrong getting it looked at by a pro.

Let us know what the guy says,

Steve



Yeah man. I guess there's nothing anybody can do from far-away, reading only descriptions of things that happened.

Thanks a lot. I'll let you know when it is fixed.
Last edited by zuhairreza at Aug 9, 2011,
#7
The E string is tensioned at the exact resonant frequency of the guitar when the strings are in tune.
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#9
Quote by zuhairreza
Can you tell me how I can fix it?!


Add more wood... lol sorry bro, It's not the easiest thing to fix lol, You would have to add wood or take wood away of the actual guitar to change the resonant frequency of it.
You want some more seeneyj hate? WELL YOU CAN'T HAVE IT

You're all a bunch of f*cking slaves! - Jim Morrison

UG Awards
1st: Biggest Ego
1st: Most Likely To Become Famous
1st: Most Pretentious User