#1
I've playing guitar for about 2 and a half years now, but I never really got much into the theory part. I only know the very basic stuff, like the existing notes (C D E F G A B C) and I think I also know what key is.

I don't think I know much else though... But I'm looking to fix that, so any help at all would be truly appreciated.

Also, this is a bit off topic, but I need to ask this simple (and probably stupid) question... To write a riff for example, or a chorus or whatever, do you need to know any theory and apply it, or could you just go along with a few chords/power chords and play what sounds right?
#2
For the off topic one I usually just play a few power chords nothing super br00talz.
Hi, you're better than me. Have a nice day!
#3
You don't need to know theory to write music. That being said, learning theory will make you a much better musician, and I strongly recommend it.
#4
Scales, the sounds of specific intervals, the sounds of certain tones in the scale over specific chords of the key.

Every scale tone has it's own unique sound in relation to both the root of the scale and all the other notes in it, and also the chords played underneath. Learning how this all works is the key to writing great solos. You can learn by spending lots of time practicing scales and learning where the roots are. Start by finding all the "A's" on the neck, and playing pentatonic scales. They have less notes than regular scales.

This sounds daunting, and it does take years to master (I am still new myself) but baby steps to get there. Learning other bands songs and solos is key. It shows you other peoples take on those regular old scales.

Yeah...
"Hey kid. You wanna cigarette?"


"No thanks! I/m already hooked on Fonicks!"

#5
Thanks guys, I'll see what I can find out about those.

Quote by Goose Catcher
You don't need to know theory to write music. That being said, learning theory will make you a much better musician, and I strongly recommend it.


I've heard people saying that a few times... But the fact is, I can't write anything that sounds good apparently (at least solo wise). I don't know what's missing, but maybe it's just the theory and that's why I'm trying to fix that.
#6
Learning theory won't make you a better writer, it will just speed up the writing process. You will more or less know what notes and chords sound good together, but as for coming up with something that sounds good, that's just creativity. What will help you a lot more is just listening to more music and different bands and getting some ideas from them.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.