#1
SO. I'm learning some scales (yay). And I'm seeing lots of different scales all labelled under the same category, like C Major Scale or A Major Scale and stuff like that.

Question is, do all these scales use the exact same fingering pattern, just with a different root note on the low E (that's usually where I start my scales)? Because if it is then I've been really making learning these scales a lot harder than they have to be.

Yeah, dumb question, but hey, I gotta start somewhere.
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#2
Yes they do but really the pattern is incidental. Scales are collections of notes, the patterns are just what present themselves when you apply those notes across the neck in reasonably usable ways.

Learn the notes of the fretboard and learn scales as notes and intervals, you'll be much better off for it.
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#3
Well I can pretty much guess a note just by looking at the string and counting from there (so not by heart), but how do you know which notes are in each scale? You can't possibly remember all of them can you?
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#4
Quote by Ragu35
Well I can pretty much guess a note just by looking at the string and counting from there (so not by heart), but how do you know which notes are in each scale? You can't possibly remember all of them can you?


This is where the patterns come in. Don't look at the patterns on the fretboard, but the patterns of intervals that make up the scales themselves. A major scale may be derived on any note using the following:

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7
a.k.a.
Tonic - Major 2nd - Major 3rd - Perfect 4th - Perfect 5th - Major 6th - Major 7th

For contrast, a Natural Minor is:

1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b6 - b7
a.k.a.
Tonic - Major 2nd - Minor 3rd - Perfect 4th - Perfect 5th - Minor 6th - Minor 7th

Once you begin figuring out the intervals between any two random notes (through memorization or just as time goes on) you'll be able to summon these scales to knowledge without delay.
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#5
Quote by Ragu35
Well I can pretty much guess a note just by looking at the string and counting from there (so not by heart), but how do you know which notes are in each scale? You can't possibly remember all of them can you?


Really what you need to know is the notes of as many of the standard major and minor scales as you can and which of them are which intervals, from there altering the standard scales to any of the more 'exotic' ones becomes much easier.

As for which notes are in the scales, I suggest you start reading Josh Urban's "The Crusade" columns, they're the go-to resource for theory on this site.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
Quote by soviet_ska
This is where the patterns come in. Don't look at the patterns on the fretboard, but the patterns of intervals that make up the scales themselves. A major scale may be derived on any note using the following:

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7
a.k.a.
Tonic - Major 2nd - Major 3rd - Perfect 4th - Perfect 5th - Major 6th - Major 7th

For contrast, a Natural Minor is:

1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b6 - b7
a.k.a.
Tonic - Major 2nd - Minor 3rd - Perfect 4th - Perfect 5th - Minor 6th - Minor 7th

Once you begin figuring out the intervals between any two random notes (through memorization or just as time goes on) you'll be able to summon these scales to knowledge without delay.


That looks like another language to me
Quote by IMTHAMAN01013
I named my guitar after my GF once... It was tempremental, the neck was too fat, and I couldn't turn down the volume, just like her...
#7
If you try the Musician section, they're a lot more devoted to theory, rather than technique.

But, to answer your question, for guitar, you're right - The fingering is exactly the same for different Major scales, you can just shift then up and down the neck.

I'd suggest you try to avoid thinking too hard about what some of the others are trying to say, if you're just starting, you could get very confused very quickly. If you want to know how to remember the notes in the scale, look into the Circle of 5ths
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#8
Quote by Ragu35
That looks like another language to me


Time to get cookin' and learn about intervals.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/musical_intervals.html

^ This seems like an acceptable lesson on the topic. Once you understand a little about intervals, scales will make more sense.

http://library.thinkquest.org/15413/theory/intervals.htm

^ Read the top section about intervals, it gives a little more info than the UG lesson.
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#9
X2 for the intervals

You should, first, learn the notes and the distance between them (tone/semitone)

Then, learn intervals themselves (Root, m2nd, M2nd, and on).
Then, the scales will seam rather simple.

but this is all theory, so kinda boring... So, you can train different shapes of the major scale while doing that, the most "interesting" should be the C Major as it is only plain notes (no sharp/flat). It will help you know where the notes are on the fretboard
#10
Thanks guys

My knowledge of "theory" at this point is knowing that a power chord has a root, a 5th, and an octave.

and that's about it.
Quote by IMTHAMAN01013
I named my guitar after my GF once... It was tempremental, the neck was too fat, and I couldn't turn down the volume, just like her...