#1
So this is a video of my doing a (pretty much atonal, it's not meant to be a song/solo or anything) bunch of different technqiues, any sort of feedback'd be nice

Stars with chordy stuff, then goes into allternate picking, natural harmonics, galloping, pedal tones, a sort of string skipping thing, sweeping and tapping

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sITXbBQc_LA

Thanks
Michael
Last edited by Seddon1707 at Aug 10, 2011,
#2
Is your pinky supposed to be flying that far away on the scale after the chords? Just my first thought, I'll keep watching and see what else.
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#3
Yeah, it's really quite annoying, even at really, really slow speeds it just goes flying off like that

edit: (Oh, and thanks for the really quick reply)
Last edited by Seddon1707 at Aug 10, 2011,
#4
Your technique is pretty good, but when you sweep pick your fretting hand's fingers move way too much, especially the pinky.
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#5
Quote by Flibo
Your technique is pretty good, but when you sweep pick your fretting hand's fingers move way too much, especially the pinky.


No idea if it's because it's just so long or what, but right, i'll slow down and try and sort that out, thanks
#6
Quote by Seddon1707
No idea if it's because it's just so long or what, but right, i'll slow down and try and sort that out, thanks

I had that problem a while ago, and I've (mostly) sorted the worst of it by doing lots and lots and lots of natural minor scales and other scales that use the pinky heavily. Started at 35bpm and did it a lot, making sure my pinky never flew away. Try that
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#7
Quote by lfcagger
I had that problem a while ago, and I've (mostly) sorted the worst of it by doing lots and lots and lots of natural minor scales and other scales that use the pinky heavily. Started at 35bpm and did it a lot, making sure my pinky never flew away. Try that


Ahh, thanks, yeah i'll give that a try
#8
Not too bad at all mate, one thing i will mention is maybe you attack the strings too high with your right so you're pushing and pulling on the strings rather than having a nice strumming motion. I can see where the problem lies, its because you have your lower forearm stuck to the guitar not allowing your forearm to help with your strumming, you are just sort of flicking your wrist. This is also true for the leads runs. Your arm needs to come from the side, rather than from the top of the guitar. I think your seating potition has a lot to do with it. When most guitarists sit with the guitar on their right leg as you do, they have the fretboard far away from their body, and their body twisted a little, the way you have the fretboard pulled against you is more suitible for holding the guitar in a classical position.

Look at a Joe Satriani vid of him sitting down and playing for an example of what i mean.

I hope this helps.
Last edited by lifeofbrian2007 at Aug 11, 2011,
#9
Quote by lifeofbrian2007
Not too bad at all mate, one thing i will mention is maybe you attack the strings too high with your right so you're pushing and pulling on the strings rather than having a nice strumming motion. I can see where the problem lies, its because you have your lower forearm stuck to the guitar not allowing your forearm to help with your strumming, you are just sort of flicking your wrist. This is also true for the leads runs. Your arm needs to come from the side, rather than from the top of the guitar. I think your seating potition has a lot to do with it. When most guitarists sit with the guitar on their right leg as you do, they have the fretboard fay away from their body, and their body twisted a little, the way you have the fretboard pulled against you is more suitible for holding the guitar in a classical position.

Look at a Joe Satriani vid of him sitting down and playing for an example of what i mean.

I hope this helps.


Ahh, yeah I see what you mean about that, consider it sorted Thanks
#10
It's personal preference, but if you tap with your middle finger you.don't have to lose the pick..
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#11
Those sweeps need a fair bit of work, they are alright on the way up but coming back down again they're rushed and very sloppy. Back to the woodshed with you!
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#12
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Those sweeps need a fair bit of work, they are alright on the way up but coming back down again they're rushed and very sloppy. Back to the woodshed with you!


Yeah, it's the pull off that messes me up I think, i'll return there immediatly
#13
I had the same problem with the pinky flying away when playing scales and stuff. My school teacher taught me an exercise to fix it which worked well. Its important to sort out the problem of fingers flying far from the fretboard as you want them as close to the string as possible in order to play more efficiently.

It was a 1-2-3-4 type chormatic exercise, going up and down the strings in the normal boring 1234 chromatic way but I was told to keep one thing in mind; my hand is an elephant. When my teacher first said this I thought I was being insulted but he explained - the elephant (my hand) would fall over if there were less than three of its legs on the ground at any time (fingers on the fretboard/strings that is (the rule doesnt apply for the first few notes of the exercise)).

You have to make sure that after you play the second note in the 1234 pattern you keep the first finger in place, and by the time you reach the fourth note (pinky on the fourth fret, E string) you should have all four fingers on the low E string. When moving to the A string you should remove the first finger and place it on the A string but keep the second, third and fourth fingers on the E string - so by the time you are playing the third fret on the A string you have three fingers on the A string but your pinky remains on the E string. You will notice this takes a lot of effort to train your pinky to stay put at first. You should continue the 1234 patter on all six strings and descend (with 1234, not 4321) all the while making sure only to remove your finger from one string when moving it to the next. At no point should there be a finger flapping about waiting to be deployed.

Do this at whatever tempo you feel comfortable (preferable with metronome). Make sure to alternate pick throughout and this could also help you with right hand muting as you wont be able to mute the strings with your left hand. I found this exercise to be really effective but it will be quite annoying at first and your fingers will feel strange and unnatural as you keep them still when they want to jump from the fretboard - it just requires concentration and some practice. I tended to tense up my arms when I first tried this so try to stay relaxed.

This is not a principal you should employ during all your practice, in fact as you become better at it you could try doing the same thing but removing the fingers from the strings and keeping them as close to the strings as you can without touching.


Edit: Also, tuning your guitar will make you sound much better.
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Last edited by Hydra150 at Aug 10, 2011,
#14
yes you should tune your guitar.. Other thing I just noticed that your fingers fly alot, I had the same problem before but I practiced chromatic/scale exercises REALLY slow (and im mean amazingly slow) and tried to lift of my fingers as little as possible, and it worked out! so practice economy of motion
#15
Couple of things:

You need to work on your right-hand smoothness, which is most evident on the chords. It feels very choppy, and it doesn't feel like you have much control over what strokes your emphasizing - loud and soft strokes seem to be varying at random.

You also need to get much quicker and changing chord forms up and down the neck, and placing your right hand with the right pressure. Assuming your action isn't set too high, there's some real sloppiness at work there.

Fixing those two things are probably the most two important things you can work on. Those are things which will scream "hack" not just to other musicians - but non musicians will notice them, too. They sound downright bad.

I think you need to slow down a lot. It seems like you're eager to play fast, but you've put speed ahead of good tone and precision. Don't play faster than you can play and still make the changes you need to make up and down the neck in time. If you're sliding up to a bar chord or a new riff late ... SLOW DOWN.

I know you wrote that this isn't supposed to be particularly musical, but I find myself noting that at every aspect of this that hints at music (rather than technique) you're far weaker than you are at the technical stuff. I mean, look, clearly you've practiced that two-hand tapping a lot, and you're reasonably good at it. You've got some licks down that some very good guitarists would struggle with. The problem is that it seems like you've mastered the /technical/ skill rather than the musical one, but almost every time you're trying to play a musical idea that breaks out of a narrow little box on the fretboard, you stumble.

So, yeah, you know, I see the problem with the flying pinky, too. But I don't really care because parts of this would still sound bad because you have much bigger problems. Focusing on the pinky is like trying to compose a poem by focusing on how your thumb hits the spacebar. Yeah, you know, it'll go easier if you hit the spacebar right - but getting the spacebar right won't actually make your poem any better.

And, honestly, tune your guitar before every time you play. If tuning your guitar is work, then buy a headstock tuner - they're cheap. The stuff you most need to work on is stuff that involves not interactions between your fingers and the strings, but rather interactions between the strings and your ears - and you can't do that if you're out of tune.
Last edited by HotspurJr at Aug 10, 2011,
#16
Quote by HotspurJr
Couple of things:

You need to work on your right-hand smoothness, which is most evident on the chords. It feels very choppy, and it doesn't feel like you have much control over what strokes your emphasizing - loud and soft strokes seem to be varying at random.

You also need to get much quicker and changing chord forms up and down the neck, and placing your right hand with the right pressure. Assuming your action isn't set too high, there's some real sloppiness at work there.

Fixing those two things are probably the most two important things you can work on. Those are things which will scream "hack" not just to other musicians - but non musicians will notice them, too. They sound downright bad.

I think you need to slow down a lot. It seems like you're eager to play fast, but you've put speed ahead of good tone and precision. Don't play faster than you can play and still make the changes you need to make up and down the neck in time. If you're sliding up to a bar chord or a new riff late ... SLOW DOWN.

I know you wrote that this isn't supposed to be particularly musical, but I find myself noting that at every aspect of this that hints at music (rather than technique) you're far weaker than you are at the technical stuff. I mean, look, clearly you've practiced that two-hand tapping a lot, and you're reasonably good at it. You've got some licks down that some very good guitarists would struggle with. The problem is that it seems like you've mastered the /technical/ skill rather than the musical one, but almost every time you're trying to play a musical idea that breaks out of a narrow little box on the fretboard, you stumble.

So, yeah, you know, I see the problem with the flying pinky, too. But I don't really care because parts of this would still sound bad because you have much bigger problems. Focusing on the pinky is like trying to compose a poem by focusing on how your thumb hits the spacebar. Yeah, you know, it'll go easier if you hit the spacebar right - but getting the spacebar right won't actually make your poem any better.

And, honestly, tune your guitar before every time you play. If tuning your guitar is work, then buy a headstock tuner - they're cheap. The stuff you most need to work on is stuff that involves not interactions between your fingers and the strings, but rather interactions between the strings and your ears - and you can't do that if you're out of tune.


Well this is totally what I was after, thanks But about the whole 'lack of musical' business, like I say, wasn't supposed to remotely musical, I was literally hitting random notes/chords in no paticular scale/key, if you like I could do another video of me playing something in key and it'd (probably) be fine, as I do know my theory/whatever

And about the tuning, yeah I thought it sounded off, but you know what it's like with a locking tremolo And i'd only picked that guitar up for that little video, been using my other in Drop C for the the rest of the day
#17
Only thing I really noticed was that your pick attack while sweep picking was a little strong. Seemed like you were actually plucking the strings. Other then that you are pretty damn good!

Keep it up.
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#19
Quote by Seddon1707
Well this is totally what I was after, thanks But about the whole 'lack of musical' business, like I say, wasn't supposed to remotely musical, I was literally hitting random notes/chords in no paticular scale/key, if you like I could do another video of me playing something in key and it'd (probably) be fine, as I do know my theory/whatever

And about the tuning, yeah I thought it sounded off, but you know what it's like with a locking tremolo And i'd only picked that guitar up for that little video, been using my other in Drop C for the the rest of the day

But what's the point in that? Technique is nothing without application - doesn't matter how fast or accurately you can execute actions on the guitar if you're not actually doing anything meaningful with them. That's why an exercise like this is ultimately pointless.

If you want critique on your technique then you need to show us something in context, let's see you actually using those techniques for a purpose.
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#20
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But what's the point in that? Technique is nothing without application - doesn't matter how fast or accurately you can execute actions on the guitar if you're not actually doing anything meaningful with them. That's why an exercise like this is ultimately pointless.

If you want critique on your technique then you need to show us something in context, let's see you actually using those techniques for a purpose.


Hmm, fair point actually, if I get a time i'll try a compose a more musical solo

And thanks to the rest of you I'm implementing some of the excercises and stuff you've recommended
#21
If you're looking for actual technical comparison, find a song with advanced usage of your techniques to sit and break down and learn, and by the time it's up to speed and clean you'll be confident in your ability to use that technique.

Of course, that's nothing to do with actual composition, but if you want an honest way to build technique where people will measure it objectively and tell you what to improve on for when you write your own stuff, learning more difficult music is the first place to start.

Personally, learning Sequoia Throne by Protest the Hero was great with a lot of small sections with certain techniques emphasized and switched - economic picking, sweeping, alternate, multi-string tapping, etc. Other stuff to look out for would be pretty much anything by virtuosos like Gilbert, Petrucci - just find something realistic to your skill level.

Again, not to say to do this in place of actual compositions, but being able to play something cleanly (and learning new music) starts off with finding an influence and working up to playing at that level.
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#22
A couple of things:

1. As far as left hand technique goes, you need examine the effect that each finger is having on the others. To do this you need to slow way, way down. Go back and forth between sets of two fingers (1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 2-4, 3-4) slowly and figure out where the "hitches" are. At what point does your pinky fly into the air and why? Figure that out and you'll be at least half way to solving the problem.

2. This has already been mentioned above, but you need to start playing music. Technique by itself is only a means to an end, and with out musical context the technique by itself is somewhat pointless. Learn a song, or a solo from a song that you like, or make up your own solo based on some chord progression.

Hope this helps
#23
Quote by Seddon1707
Well this is totally what I was after, thanks But about the whole 'lack of musical' business, like I say, wasn't supposed to remotely musical, I was literally hitting random notes/chords in no paticular scale/key, if you like I could do another video of me playing something in key and it'd (probably) be fine, as I do know my theory/whatever


Maybe ...

Maybe not.

In my experience, the guys who know music - when they play something "random" it still sounds like music.

It all comes back to your ear. You're at the stage of your development (which is fine! Nothing wrong with it!) where "random" means "random ideas on the fretboard" and I want to push you to the place where random means, "A bunch of random musical ideas."

Ultimately, it wasn't about what key or scale you were or weren't using. It's one of those things - a really good musician, he picks up the guitar and plays three notes - any three notes - and it's music.

Not trying to be as harsh as I think I'm sounding here. Part of why I'm focusing on this is because I think a lot of your speed/chops stuff is pretty good. Room for improvement? Sure. We all have that.

But the big leap, for you, will come from starting to think about MUSIC rather than technique.

And about the tuning, yeah I thought it sounded off, but you know what it's like with a locking tremolo And i'd only picked that guitar up for that little video, been using my other in Drop C for the the rest of the day


Get a tremel-no or block it off or something.

I dunno. I hate floating trems. I think they primarily exist to make guitars go out of tune, to the real detriment of players like yourself who need to focus on what the sounds coming out of their guitar are.

But seriously. Make it a point, tune up. Every time you play. It will help your development. If something sounds off, stop and fix it.
#24
You don't have your guitar in tune.
You lift your fingers from the strings more than you should. Practice 1-2-3-4 exercises slowly, lifting your fingers as little as possible.
You are too tense. Lightnen up, and relax, we can all reach the top of the stairway, and we all will. Some will faster than others, but we all will.

You just have to practice everything, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER, SLOWER at first! You should repeat this until you can't get it out of your head.