#2
the third is the most unstable note in a simple major or minor chord. that could be it
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#3
It's to do with the physics of the wave lengths. It's really difficult to explain but if you research the science behind harmonies you'll understand that unlike the fifth, the third resonates in a much different way to the tonic. The fifth resonates in a very simlar way. This means that the third almost clashes when using distortion, because the high variation between the wavelengths makes it difficult for the harmony to be heard with distortion.
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#4
Quote by Jiimmyyy
It's to do with the physics of the wave lengths. It's really difficult to explain but if you research the science behind harmonies you'll understand that unlike the fifth, the third resonates in a much different way to the tonic. The fifth resonates in a very simlar way. This means that the third almost clashes when using distortion, because the high variation between the wavelengths makes it difficult for the harmony to be heard with distortion.


thanks for the clear answer!

i assume the same can be said about the b5 right?
#5
generally speaking chords don't sound good with distortion, powerchords dont count because they're only two notes. but here's a useful tip; turn off the distortion?

also, I've always wondered why if you harmonize a guitar with distortion with thirds by yourself it sounds like shit, but if you have another guitar and you both play the notes individually it sounds fine
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#6
Quote by Wiegenlied
generally speaking chords don't sound good with distortion, powerchords dont count because they're only two notes. but here's a useful tip; turn off the distortion?

Why turn off the distortion, when all you need to do is merely turn it down?
Chords sound great when they're not over-distorted; no need to go completely clean.

also, I've always wondered why if you harmonize a guitar with distortion with thirds by yourself it sounds like shit, but if you have another guitar and you both play the notes individually it sounds fine

Two different people will have different tones and touch; you doing it yourself will have the same exact tone and touch.
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#7
Quote by Sleaze Disease
Two different people will have different tones and touch; you doing it yourself will have the same exact tone and touch.

That's not it. With one guitar you have one signal containing the chord, and then it gets distorted and you hear it and perceive it as "muddy". With two guitars you have two signals each containing a single note that get distorted separately and when hear them at the same time it sounds like good ol' Iron Maiden. I'm not perhaps the best person to put this into words but I believe this is the basic principle behind this.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#8
If I recall correctly, all of the frequencies of the perfect intervals (perfect fourth, fifth, and the octave) can be evenly divided into the frequency of the root note, which is why they sound good together, and are musically neutral. There's a bit of physics involved that will take a bit of explaining, but just know that the frequency of any other interval can not be divided equally into the root, which causes dissonance when the different waves interact with each other, and allows for the different qualities of triads to be heard. This is why open chords played with distortion sound pretty bad, since distortion basically boosts the audio signal until it clips, causing overtones to be heard more easily.
Last edited by zincabopataurio at Aug 10, 2011,
#9
A 3rd is out of phase from the tonic and 5th
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#10
Quote by zincabopataurio
If I recall correctly, all of the frequencies of the perfect intervals (perfect fourth, fifth, and the octave) can be evenly divided into the frequency of the root note, which is why they sound good together, and are musically neutral. There's a bit of physics involved that will take a bit of explaining, but just know that the frequency of any other interval can not be divided equally into the root, which causes dissonance when the different waves interact with each other, and allows for the different qualities of triads to be heard. This is why open chords played with distortion sound pretty bad, since distortion basically boosts the audio signal until it clips, causing overtones to be heard more easily.


All notes' frequencies are relative to each other. Like the ratio of the frequencies of two notes an octave apart is 2:1, i.e. double. So one note could be 440hz and its octave would be 880hz.
A perfect 5th is 3:2, a major 3rd is 5:4, a minor 3rd is 6:5.
The general rule is: the simpler the ratio, the better the notes will sound together
Sorry if that didn't even answer your question, but added to what other people have said it might mean something or just be interesting haha
Last edited by captainsnazz at Aug 10, 2011,
#11
Quote by captainsnazz
All notes' frequencies are relative to each other. Like the ratio of the frequencies of two notes an octave apart is 2:1, i.e. double. So one note could be 440hz and its octave would be 880hz.
A perfect 5th is 3:2, a major 3rd is 5:4, a minor 3rd is 6:5.
The general rule is: the simpler the ratio, the better the notes will sound together
Sorry if that didn't even answer your question, but added to what other people have said it might mean something or just be interesting haha

OH YA now I remember! Ya bascially what you said makes more sense.
Last edited by zincabopataurio at Aug 10, 2011,
#13
Quote by Zanon
You could try voicing your root and the 3rd further apart ..? Avoids quite a bit of science not that the science is a bad thing, just a practical solution

Psychoacoustics is science

Yeah, have them an octave+3rd apart helps.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#14
Furthermore, a guitar is intonated to equal temperament. The interval of a third is quite some way out from the natural / just intonation and this difference is easily audible as 'beating'. Personally I dislike the sound of a major third in equal temperament.
#15
Quote by Flibo
Psychoacoustics is science



I didn't say it wasn't science. I just offered a practical solution to a practical problem, I am interested in the science of sound waves, but I feel for this situation he wanted more of a hands on guide ?
Last edited by Zanon at Aug 11, 2011,
#16
Although most of the above response are correct, the reason this problem becomes an issue when you have overdrive is because it brings out all the harmonic overtones more clearly.
#17
^+1 if you're using too much distortion it's going to sound nasty. i usually use that as a guideline, nail a chord and turn up the gain until it sounds muddy then turn it back down until it isn't. once its not muddy then thats a good estimate of where your distortion needs to be.

Quote by Sleaze Disease
Why turn off the distortion, when all you need to do is merely turn it down?
Chords sound great when they're not over-distorted; no need to go completely clean.

this, you don't need to turn it off, just turn it down. guitar/amp combos all behave differently so you might need to turn it way down.
#18
playing the 3rd as the top note also decreases the overtone clash...i try to play with minimal distortion for chords..even then..i play the chord almost arpeggio style..so each note gets played by itself..this is not a perfect solution..but it works sometime..

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