#1
I've been playing for about 6 years, and my main genres are blues, rock, metal, and a little bit of funk. I want to start learning how to play some Jazz (think wes montgomery), but I really have no idea where to begin. It just seems so different from all the other styles I play, and is way outside of my comfort zone, but I've recently gained an appreciation for Jazz, so I want to learn it. Chords, chord progressions, scales, rhythms, songs, technique, lessons, youtube videos, ANYTHING will be appreciated. Thank you!
1950s Reissue Fender Stratocaster
Epiphone Gold Top Les Paul
Fender Hot Rod Deville
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
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Ibanez TS-9
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#2
Before you start with jazz swing music, try learn blues with jazz so you have a common ground. You already know how to play blues so just put some jazz in it.

First jazz song to learn is Autumn Leaves...the most famous and common jazz standard. Learn the chords, and melody. Once you do that, then maybe you can watch other people play it and analyze it. I will say that the most important thing is to listen to a lot of jazz.

The hardest thing about the jazz is how to swing. Jazz is a hard, I was in the same situation you are maybe about half a year ago. I can improv but not good enough to play in a band yet. It takes times.
#3
I second Autumn Leaves. Learn that song inside out.

7 chords are very important. And modes.

12 bar jazz blues are a good place to too. Check out Tenor Madness for example.

I have charts for tenor madness and autumn leaves. I can email you them
If you want. Just kick me a pm.
#4
You learn how to swing by listening to great players who swing. Transcribing their playing is a must! Jazz is a whole new world of time feel!
Andy
#5
Quote by mikerev
I second Autumn Leaves. Learn that song inside out.

7 chords are very important. And modes.

12 bar jazz blues are a good place to too. Check out Tenor Madness for example.

I have charts for tenor madness and autumn leaves. I can email you them
If you want. Just kick me a pm.



ARGH. It's not as simple as that - It's more about chord extensions which compliment or even contain the melody, not just 7th chords, as for modes. Well, you aren't wrong per se but to just say 'modes are important' is like saying 'eating is important' - sure, but what do I eat ? Grass ? Turd ?

For now I'd focus on learning some pieces (first the chords and then the melody) and really honing on the swing feel as that's the element to playing this type of stuff.
Last edited by Zanon at Aug 10, 2011,
#6
Thanks for the help, I'm gonna check out Autumn Leaves tomorrow. And I feel like I'm not that bad at swinging, I just don't know what notes/chords to play at the right times. There's so many weird chords in Jazz that I've never really used before.
1950s Reissue Fender Stratocaster
Epiphone Gold Top Les Paul
Fender Hot Rod Deville
Electro-Harmonix Metal Muff
Electro-Harmonix Big Muff
Ibanez TS-9
Boss BF-3
Boss DD-6
Wylde Signature Cry Baby
DigiTech Whammy 4
#8
Quote by RoboRobot
Thanks for the help, I'm gonna check out Autumn Leaves tomorrow. And I feel like I'm not that bad at swinging, I just don't know what notes/chords to play at the right times. There's so many weird chords in Jazz that I've never really used before.



It could be worth learning your chords in the CAGED positions. Specifically 7th chords and then build on your extended chord knowledge from there. I never could learn new chords and really memorize them just by reading a diagram from a book - but that's just me !
#9
Learn how to construct chords from just looking at the chord names with extensions and alterations - start small with 7ths and their alterations and then go up to 9ths, 13ths, etc. Learn a handful of voicings for the same chord. This obviously comes with practice and the ability to recognize chords will increase the more you look at charts.
Learn these bebop scales: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bebop_scale as well as the bebop altered scale and the half-whole scales.

Just a few things that I find vital for my own jazz playing.
#10
Hi,

When I started getting into Jazz I found learning licks/songs by players that fused styles together e.g. if you come from a blues background Robben Ford is a good place to start as he plays the changes but still retains that blues edge. Which would help with learning new scales and more importantly the various applications for them. Also take a lick say for a major chord and rework the notes so it will work over a dominant, minor or altered chord. You will begin to develop a stockpile of licks that you can use them over jazz standards.

Hope this helps
#11
1. listen to as much jazz as possible
2. learn to recognize as many jazz standards as you can melodic and harmonic
3. learn to swing I assume you know the minor pentatonic scale practice the swinging rhythm eight notes,triplets etc. swinging rhythm is the probably the most important thing you need to work on.
4. learn chords recognize shapes and also understand the function on the chord in the progression and the tension notes that can be added.

this should keep you busy for a while
#12
When it comes to Jazz, listen to what Jayx124 is telling you.

If you need a reason why, go on his myspace.
#16
Quote by RoboRobot
I've been playing for about 6 years, and my main genres are blues, rock, metal, and a little bit of funk. I want to start learning how to play some Jazz (think wes montgomery), but I really have no idea where to begin. It just seems so different from all the other styles I play, and is way outside of my comfort zone, but I've recently gained an appreciation for Jazz, so I want to learn it. Chords, chord progressions, scales, rhythms, songs, technique, lessons, youtube videos, ANYTHING will be appreciated. Thank you!

Definately immerse yourself in it. Jazz standards like All Of Me, Route 66, Ipanema, Summertime, Sunny are good places to start.

Learm the lyrics first. The old school players would never play the song unless they knew the lyrics. The melody should then become fairly easy to work out, then the harmony. Learn by ear, you'll internalise it much better, don't rely on a Real Book.
Last edited by mdc at Aug 13, 2011,
#17
I say this every time I see a thread like this, and I'm not sure if anyone ever listens to me or not, but you should always start with some Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington to get a feel for basic jazz. Here:

On the Sunny Side of the Street - Louis Armstrong

I Let a Song Go Out of My Heart - Ella Fitzgerald (written by Ellington)

Prelude to a Kiss - Ella Fitzgerald (Written by Ellington)

All of Me - Louis Armstrong

Black and Tan Fantasy - Duke Ellington and his orchestra (written by Ellington)

I should also note that if you want to hear a good version of an Ellington song or most other standards for that matter, try to find a take with Ella Fitzgerald singing it. There's no better way to hear the purest, most relatable version of a standard. In any case, most of these can be played with basic scales and a reasonable amount of adjustments for key changes and the odd chord here and there. Don't start trying to play a Monk tune right off the bat or you'll just get frustrated because you aren't feeling the music. If you can't feel a Louis Armstrong performance or an Ellington tune, you're not going to have any success with more complex songs.