#1
So, for the first time in my years of playing, I am starting to use a lot of alternative tunings. My pedal unit is the floor pod plus. It has a built in tuner. But, I find that if I go from, say, standard tuning, to drop C, I can't just go through the 6 strings 1 time. I have to do them all over an over. When I do the 6 string it gets nailed on C. Then the 5 on F and the 4 on C, etc. but when I'm done, I have to go back up and start over as the 6 string is no longer on C, it's usually somewhere around D or Db. After the painful loop through the strings 4 or 5 times, they are where they are supposed to be.

Is the tuner on this unit just not smart enough to handle this? Is a chromatic tuner the answer? And, stupid question for a 25 year guitar player, how does a chromatic tuner differ from any other.

Thanks guys!
#2
Hey I have some experience with the Floor Pod tuners but I own the plain old Floor Pod.
First of all a Chromatic Tuner can tune to any one of the 12 semitones in an octave (i.e. A Bb B C C# etc.) while a non-chromatic tuner is restricted to certain pitches (i.e. the pitches of the strings in standard) On my Floor POD the Tuner is chromatic and I'd be extremely surprised if the floor POD plus isn't chromatic seeing as I've never seen any Floor POD series unit (I've played some of the higher end ones as well) without a chromatic tuner.

Anyways, I also use quite a few alternative tunings (i.e. Standard, Drop tunings down to B, and Open Tunings) and I've personally never had that problem (and I'm currently using it with a cheap squier strat) Tuning it once outs it quite nicely in tune. THough it might lack the precision for studio use, it's been quite reliable for jamming and the few performances I;ve used it.
#3
Thanks for your reply so quickly. I agree with you, I can't imagine that the Floor Pod Plus doesn't have at least as good a tuner. But, without fail, every time I go from one tuning to the other, it takes several attempts. I go from E on 6 to C, dead on, then do the other 5 strings. But then when I go back to check E on 6, it's at least a half, if not more off. Takes me 5 minutes to get it right. Incredibly frustrating.
#4
Quote by dolfantimmy

Is the tuner on this unit just not smart enough to handle this? Is a chromatic tuner the answer? And, stupid question for a 25 year guitar player, how does a chromatic tuner differ from any other.


This is not a function of your tuner.

It is a function of your guitar.

Tuning the guitar down reduces the string tension - which increases the string tension on every other string, making them go sharp.

There are two primary sources of this. The biggie is a floating trem. (If you have a trem and don't use it, block it off or get a tremel-no. This will save you from a lot of these tuning issues). But even hard-tail guitars will do this a little, as the neck relaxes back (slightly) as you flatten a string.

There is no tuner which is "smart enough" to know that this is an issue, because there's no way your tuner can know how you're going to tune all your other strings. eg, if you drop your low-E to D, is it because you're going into dropped-D tuning, open D, open G, or DADGAD?

The only tool you have which is smart enough to anticipate and manage this problem is the one between your ears. First of all, know that you're going to have to make two passes and don't worry about your first pass being totally precise. Second, know how your guitar behaves under the tuning chances you tend to make, and compensate. eg, if you're going to go a half step sharp on your a-string once you've adjusted everything else, tune it to about half a step flat.

But there's no way to completely shortcut this process. For the most part, you're going to do two passes.

A "chromatic" tuner is just one which will tell you what note you hit, no matter what note it is. Some guitar tuners (less so, now - but this was more common way back when) will only tell you when you're exactly in tune at the notes E, A, D, G, and B.
#5
HotspurJr, thanks for the great answer. I had an inkling it might be something to do with the neck tension changing. It's a standard strat that I'm tuning, so it makes perfect sense.

Guess the answer is ANOTHER guitar, right? lol
#6
Quote by dolfantimmy
HotspurJr, thanks for the great answer. I had an inkling it might be something to do with the neck tension changing. It's a standard strat that I'm tuning, so it makes perfect sense.

Guess the answer is ANOTHER guitar, right? lol


Or heavier gauge strings. Or a strings and a setup. Or another guitar. You have options.
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#7
Quote by dolfantimmy
Guess the answer is ANOTHER guitar, right? lol

Sounds like the perfect excuse to me!
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#8
I have the exact same floor pod as you, and I've had the same problem, but the problem has nothing to do with the built in tuner. If you have a floating bridge, that's your problem.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.