#1
1.what is the point of tuning the guitar half step down?

2. I see the tabs that say that tuning is half step down...but the chords positions are normal as in standard tuning...whats up with that? doesnt the chords and scales positions change when we tune half step down?

3. if the chords positions change...do we have to reposition all the formations and scales and boxes and stuff?
#2
It's to get lower chords.
f you tune every string half step down the positions remain the same because the intervals between the strings are the same.
#3
Often it's simply to accomodate the singer's vocal range.
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#4
sounds heavier and less bright, better for most metal and hard rock

or to accompany lower voiced singers, thats why thin lizzy played in half step down
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#5
It could be to help play with another instrument. EG that instrument has keys that are easier to play so down tuning(or up) will make it easier to back as the standard for guitar is e minor/major, a minor/major that sort of thing.
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#6
Quote by Rattle_Slash
1.what is the point of tuning the guitar half step down?

2. I see the tabs that say that tuning is half step down...but the chords positions are normal as in standard tuning...whats up with that? doesnt the chords and scales positions change when we tune half step down?

3. if the chords positions change...do we have to reposition all the formations and scales and boxes and stuff?



1. Initially it was tommi iommi who made electric guitar detuning common, because he had an accident and cut his fingertips off (although obviously different tunings have happened throughout the history of the guitar going back to the Lire and the Lude in Greek history. For him it made the strings looser/less tense and made it less painful to play.

It can make the sound heavier, and it also is done a lot by bands of the singer cant hit the high notes.

2. Nothing changes in terms of tabs and scale shapes, you just assume everything is where it is played but detuned. Notation is obviously going to be different.

3. Same as 2.
#7
Quote by Sir-Shredalot
1. Initially it was tommi iommi who made electric guitar detuning common, because he had an accident and cut his fingertips off (although obviously different tunings have happened throughout the history of the guitar going back to the Lire and the Lude in Greek history. For him it made the strings looser/less tense and made it less painful to play.

It can make the sound heavier, and it also is done a lot by bands of the singer cant hit the high notes.

2. Nothing changes in terms of tabs and scale shapes, you just assume everything is where it is played but detuned. Notation is obviously going to be different.

3. Same as 2.



thanx mate...that was really helpful...so the formations dont change...tey just slide down a fret....

and thanx all....
#8
Heavier sound really, Guns N Roses and Alice in Chains use it a lot and i think AC/DC use it live know because of Brian Johnson's vocal range
#9
Quote by Sir-Shredalot
1. Initially it was tommi iommi who made electric guitar detuning common, because he had an accident and cut his fingertips off (although obviously different tunings have happened throughout the history of the guitar going back to the Lire and the Lude in Greek history. For him it made the strings looser/less tense and made it less painful to play.

It can make the sound heavier, and it also is done a lot by bands of the singer cant hit the high notes.

2. Nothing changes in terms of tabs and scale shapes, you just assume everything is where it is played but detuned. Notation is obviously going to be different.

3. Same as 2.

You mean toni
#10
Quote by Rattle_Slash
thanx mate...that was really helpful...so the formations dont change...tey just slide down a fret....

and thanx all....


Slide up a fret.

C is 8th fret low E, 9th fret if you're in Eb.
#11
So if my guitar is tuned down half a step and I'm writing a song in D minor I would still use the notes in the D minor scale and not use the same position on the fret board as if I was in standerd tuning am I right? If I used the same position on the finger board with my guitar tuned down half a step the song would then be in Db Minor? Sorry for highjacking.
#12
Quote by da_
So if my guitar is tuned down half a step and I'm writing a song in D minor I would still use the notes in the D minor scale and not use the same position on the fret board as if I was in standerd tuning am I right? If I used the same position on the finger board with my guitar tuned down half a step the song would then be in Db Minor? Sorry for highjacking.


Right. If you're tuned down, and you still want to be in D, you need to move everything UP a fret. The shapes don't change, but your scale will start one note higher. If you start it on the same fret, you're now in Db.

This gets a little confusing because a lot of people write out notation or chords (particularly online, but elsewhere, too) as if you were in normal tuning.

So you might see someone talking about, say, Sweet Child of Mine, which I think is tuned down, and they'll say, "The chords are D-C-G-D." Now, what they really mean is that the chords are Db, Cb, Gb, and Db - but they're played the way the non-flat chords are played because the guitar is tuned down. (It's the same as if when people play with a capo. A lot of the time they'll slap a Capo on the third, and then talk about the chords as if there were no capo - eg, they'll call something a G when it's really an A# - but it's a G-shape chord, starting on the third fret off the capo).
#13
Quote by HotspurJr
Right. If you're tuned down, and you still want to be in D, you need to move everything UP a fret. The shapes don't change, but your scale will start one note higher. If you start it on the same fret, you're now in Db.

This gets a little confusing because a lot of people write out notation or chords (particularly online, but elsewhere, too) as if you were in normal tuning.

So you might see someone talking about, say, Sweet Child of Mine, which I think is tuned down, and they'll say, "The chords are D-C-G-D." Now, what they really mean is that the chords are Db, Cb, Gb, and Db - but they're played the way the non-flat chords are played because the guitar is tuned down. (It's the same as if when people play with a capo. A lot of the time they'll slap a Capo on the third, and then talk about the chords as if there were no capo - eg, they'll call something a G when it's really an A# - but it's a G-shape chord, starting on the third fret off the capo).


Hey thaks for that, thats what I though but I was just making sure.
#14
Quote by Sir-Shredalot
1. Initially it was tommi iommi who made electric guitar detuning common, because he had an accident and cut his fingertips off (although obviously different tunings have happened throughout the history of the guitar going back to the Lire and the Lude in Greek history. For him it made the strings looser/less tense and made it less painful to play.

It can make the sound heavier, and it also is done a lot by bands of the singer cant hit the high notes.

2. Nothing changes in terms of tabs and scale shapes, you just assume everything is where it is played but detuned. Notation is obviously going to be different.

3. Same as 2.



I think Stevie Ray Vaughan made it a big thing, he used big 0.13's for a bigger sound, and tuned down a half step to make it a little easier on his fingers.
#15
Quote by willwelsh816
I think Stevie Ray Vaughan made it a big thing, he used big 0.13's for a bigger sound, and tuned down a half step to make it a little easier on his fingers.

hendrix was doing before both of them, most likely for vocal reasons or he liked the heavier sound. he would go down to D sometimes.

but you do bring up a point. some people downtune to make heavy strings easier to play. i do it for both reasons: easier to play and easier for me to sing.
#16
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
hendrix was doing before both of them, most likely for vocal reasons or he liked the heavier sound. he would go down to D sometimes.

but you do bring up a point. some people downtune to make heavy strings easier to play. i do it for both reasons: easier to play and easier for me to sing.


that seems interesting. when did hendrix go into D tuning. Do you know of any examples?
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#17
It's to make the notes a half step down. You play it exactly the same as you would standard. nothing is really different.
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#18
Quote by DanBrown93
that seems interesting. when did hendrix go into D tuning. Do you know of any examples?

well he did on voodoo chile on electric lady land (the long bluesy one, not slight return) and the band of gypsys live album was in D. machine gun is an example. well, somewhere between D and Eb, but pretty much D. ive also seen a few live clips here and there where he was in D.