#1
I know, your probably thinking not one of these threads again but I would really love to hear any opinions about the two. I played the jazz a few different occasions and I love the way it feels and sounds. I was pretty set on buying one until I came across videos of the Corvette. The tone sounds so meaty and the bottom end seems second to none but apparently they are super heavy which I might not mind too much. Unfortunately I have never seen one in guitar center or my local music store so I'm kinda at a crossroads. I think versatility would be my main selling point as I'm interested in playing anything and everything from metal to jazz. Thanks for any help you may provide me with
#2
Really you should try both out, but I understand that thats not always possible. The good news is both are fantastic basses, although the current corvette standard basses are currently being made in korea, either way, they will both do you justice, both play nicely and are reasonably versatile, while the jazz gets tonnes of different tones I find that the corvette is just as versatile, its quite at home in any genre. The corvette duoble buck would also be a good option because its made in germany and is very versatile.
Hope this helps
I dont know what to put in here!
#3
don't let the MIK distinction for the warwick fool you they are extremely well made instruments. Are you looking at the Bubinga warwick or the Ash model? The neck on the warwick is fairly chunky so you should definitely try one first. they are both extremely versatile instruments but i find that the fender tends towards more vintage tones and the warwick is a little more modern but really either bass could do both.
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

Quote by AeolianWolf
absolutely what will said

Yay, my first compliment!
#4
^ Warwick have slimmed up their necks in the last couple of years.
Not a lot of point buying a Pro Series 'Vette when the German ones are a dime a dozen on the used market. I paid $550 for my Bubinga std to give you an example.
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#6
Get the Jazz. Recent studies indicate Warwicks cause cancer.

...Stands by for the wrath of 'Wick fans...

Seriously, I think you'll be happier with the Jazz. It has plenty of low end on tap and it is (IMHO) easier to play. Most of the Warwicks I've played have very thick necks. But as others have said, try them both and decide for yourself.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#7
Get one of the last German 'vettes and it'll have the proper shape neck. They're cheap, too.
#8
Quote by FatalGear41
It has plenty of low end on tap and it is (IMHO) easier to play. Most of the Warwicks I've played have very thick necks. But as others have said, try them both and decide for yourself.

All depends on the year. I wish people would stop generalizing Warwicks as having thick necks. The neck on my '98 is not that much thicker than a standard Jazz neck.
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#9
Quote by consecutive e
All depends on the year. I wish people would stop generalizing Warwicks as having thick necks. The neck on my '98 is not that much thicker than a standard Jazz neck.


+1 to that i played a $$ at guitar center once and it was more comfortable than a jazz but only a hair thicker
Quote by Bass First
Rump, a P-bass delivers a rump in the sound such that, similar to the rump on an African American woman, it is the highlight of the tone.