#1
When I was at work today (post office) I was reading some adress in I think it was Switzerland and came to think, doesn't Switzerland have three languages, France, German and Italian or something? And I wondered, what's the official language for post addresses and such in bilingual countries?

I know Finland has two languages and not even all of them talk the second language at all, and Swedish and Finnish isn't even close to each other. How does that work with street names and such?
sometimes I see us in a cymbal splash or in the sound of a car crash
#2
It's pretty clearly divided here in Canada, and then everything official is bilingual.

And I don't speak French.
fear is the mindkiller


CANUCKS
#3
Quote by TheEducatedFool
It's pretty clearly divided here in Canada, and then everything official is bilingual.


So, certain parts can have french name on the street signs and stuff? Does all canadicks know both languages?
sometimes I see us in a cymbal splash or in the sound of a car crash
#5
Just match the letters and your good.

We have two languages in America, English, and Spanish, but I think everything is being converted into Spanish, because everything I buy or everwhere I go, you see the Spanish first, then you find the English version in smaller text.

Idk what the Mexicans do in America that refuse to learn English, prolly just match the letters.
#7
Quote by ethan_hanus
Just match the letters and your good.

We have two languages in America, English, and Spanish, but I think everything is being converted into Spanish, because everything I buy or everwhere I go, you see the Spanish first, then you find the English version in smaller text.

Idk what the Mexicans do in America that refuse to learn English, prolly just match the letters.

We don't actually have any official language on a federal level.
#9
In Hong Kong, the official language for an address is English. We have 3 main languages and in order they are:

1. Cantonese Chinese
2. Mandarin Chinese; and
3. English

The road signs are all in both Traditional Chinese and English. We also drive on the left.

Road Sign:



¤´¨留話 請留話 請在我說完後
¸.•´¸.•´¨¸.•¤¨哭泣我不在這裡 我不在那裡請在嗶一聲之後留
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ .•´(´¸.•¤´`¤下自己的秘密請在嗶一聲之後對話筒沾自喜請在嗶一聲之後對空氣唉聲嘆氣


我不在這裡 我人在哪裡 我想到哪裡¤

請在嗶一聲之後留下有聲的話題¤

請在嗶一聲之後分擔感情的問題¤


¤¤¤

Last edited by Harmonius at Aug 11, 2011,
#10
Quote by JohnnyGenzale
So, certain parts can have french name on the street signs and stuff? Does all canadicks know both languages?

I believe it is the law in Quebec that all signs must be in French. It doesn't matter anywhere else though. Some road signs on or near reserves have local indigenous languages on them alongside English, at least around here they do.

And no, I'm pretty sure there are a lot of people that don't know both official languages.
fear is the mindkiller


CANUCKS
#11
Quote by ethan_hanus
I know, I never said official.

Fair enough.

The two most prevalent languages where I live are English and Spanish, and it is definitely helpful to at least know a little bit of Spanish. But for the most part everything is labeled bilingually, especially downtown.
#12
Quote by TheEducatedFool
I believe it is the law in Quebec that all signs must be in French. It doesn't matter anywhere else though. Some road signs on or near reserves have local indigenous languages on them alongside English, at least around here they do.

And no, I'm pretty sure there are a lot of people that don't know both official languages.


Thats cause Quebec is weird and no one likes them.
Quote by JD Close
Piano dick had some good parts, but should have said "As the business man slowly gets boned", would have accented the whole dick feeling of the album
#13
Quote by JohnnyGenzale
So, certain parts can have french name on the street signs and stuff? Does all canadicks know both languages?


Pretty much just Quebec has french signage, and a good lot of them can speak both languages.
but most of us prairie dogs and coastdicks can't tell shit from sandwich in French
Last edited by CorvetteRick at Aug 11, 2011,
#14
Well in Switz,its divided into three regions, French, German and Italian, so addresses work on that basis. I don't see much "tripling" of signs in the city, no more than the usual tourist translations you get in Europe, though I suppose there is a priority given to thr Swiss languages.
#15
In New Zealand we have English and Maori. English is spoken by pretty much everyone, Maori is spoken by a small amount of the population. Place names and such are still named in English and Maori though. You don't really need to be able to speak the language to pronounce street names and stuff.
#16
I'm from Finland and all streets have two names, at least in Helsinki. Most official stuff related to the state is available in Swedish and all services should be available to those who don't speak Finnish.

Just about 6% of Finns speak Swedish as their mother tongue, but they're still a huge pain in the ass
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#17

This is at the university in town. The other language is Secwepemc, or Shuswap to most English speakers.
fear is the mindkiller


CANUCKS
#18
Quote by devourke
In New Zealand we have English and Maori. English is spoken by pretty much everyone, Maori is spoken by a small amount of the population. Place names and such are still named in English and Maori though. You don't really need to be able to speak the language to pronounce street names and stuff.


Similar over here, Irish instead of Maori.
#20
Quote by Flibo
I'm from Finland and all streets have two names, at least in Helsinki. Most official stuff related to the state is available in Swedish and all services should be available to those who don't speak Finnish.

Just about 6% of Finns speak Swedish as their mother tongue, but they're still a huge pain in the ass


Sweden > Finland. Dumma finne.
sometimes I see us in a cymbal splash or in the sound of a car crash