#1
Hey all. A couple of months back I had my Lag arkane 500 st set up for drop c by my local shop, and now I want to tune it back to e standard.

The problem is that the guitar has a floyd rose bridge, and I have never tuned it from a low tuning as drop c to e standard.

Could anyone of you give me some pointers as to what I need to be aware of and where I need to be carefull ? Maybe point me to a tutorial on it or so ? ( I haven't been able to find any tut's on this specific matter myself ).

I want to learn and try to do it myself this time, because I really don't want to pay 35 euro's to my local shop and have to miss my guitar for 2 weeks, But I'm afraid I will damage something If I go ahead and try this without proper study.

Edit: Oh and I forgot, it is equiped with 0.11 at the moment.
Last edited by Killswitch097 at Aug 12, 2011,
#2
Don't worry, your guitar isn't going to spontaneously combust if you tune it to something else.

Floating bridges are very simple mechanisms - they just appear complex to an untrained eye. Basically what's going on is you have 2 counteracting forces, both acting on the Floyd rose. Force A is string tension, and force B is spring tension. The goal is to have these forces balanced.

Tuning up increases tension. To counteract that, you need to loosen your springs, thereby lowering your spring tension. Same thing goes for the reverse: If you want to tune down, you need to increase your spring tension by tightening the springs in the back.
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#3
Quote by Offworld92
.

Tuning up increases tension. To counteract that, you need to loosen your springs, thereby lowering your spring tension. Same thing goes for the reverse: If you want to tune down, you need to increase your spring tension by tightening the springs in the back.


The first part of what offworld says is absolutely right. You want to balance the string tension and spring tension to keep the floyd rose level with the plane of the guitar body. However to me tuning the strings to a higher pitch ie going from C to E would mean increasing the string tension so this would cause the bridge to be pulled up away from the body and you would want to balance the increased string tension by increasing the spring tension. One should balance the other. If one goes up then so should the other.

You would basically remove the cover on the underside of the body below the trem block and turn the screws clockwise that hold the base of the strings until the trem sits the same way it did before. Turn each screw by the same margin so that all screws share the increased load.

Good luck and let me know how you get on.
#4
Quote by Offworld92
Don't worry, your guitar isn't going to spontaneously combust if you tune it to something else.

Floating bridges are very simple mechanisms - they just appear complex to an untrained eye. Basically what's going on is you have 2 counteracting forces, both acting on the Floyd rose. Force A is string tension, and force B is spring tension. The goal is to have these forces balanced.

Tuning up increases tension. To counteract that, you need to loosen your springs, thereby lowering your spring tension. Same thing goes for the reverse: If you want to tune down, you need to increase your spring tension by tightening the springs in the back
.


You got that backwards, the more tension you create by tuning up, you need to increase the spring tension to keep the bridge level, and the opposite when downtuning.
#7
Haha my bad. Thank you for pointing that out, McAllister and ethan_hanus. I probably got confused while typing.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#8
One thing I would add is that if you ever have to add tension to a FR or any floating-style tremolo, you should de-tune the two highest strings slightly to counteract the extra tension.

Ideally, you want the body of the tremolo to run parallel with the body of the guitar. You can change overall action with a slight downward angle but you may get minor fret buzz if you don't do it right. It's all a fine balance.

NEVER simply adjust the FR in one shot. Do it quarter-turn at a time equally and re-tune. Keep doing it that way to avoid snapping strings or having a nightmare tuning it.
#9
Are you overlooking truss rod adjustment?
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#10
Yeah true enough you may find the increased tension changes the neck relief and makes it curve more. You may get away with it depending on the guitar you have but any probs come back to this thread ad we will try and steer you in the right direction again. Didnt want to overload you with info. One thing at a time eh ha ha.
#11
Well it took some time, but through a combination of taking my time, logical thinking and most of all following the pointers you gave me, my guitar is now perfectly in standard e.

I'm just going to check the neck, but other then that it should be ready to go.

thanks for all the help guys ! Glad to be finally able to tune a floyd rose, now I just have to perfect that skill, but that will come over time.
#12
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#13
Just open up the back. Turn the screws attached to the springs in equal increments. It will take some trial and error but it'll end up in tune. i always use floyds and this is how i do it