#1
which is better working inside superior drummer which has a built in tools for mixing and mastering or using the mixing and mastering tools of my DAW
im sick with GAS
#3
It's important to use the mixing tools in superior since you can control the eq and other effects seperately for each part of the kit. All the DAW will be able to do is process the whole kit together. So start with editing in superior, then in the daw.
#4
Quote by lextexrex
It's important to use the mixing tools in superior since you can control the eq and other effects seperately for each part of the kit. All the DAW will be able to do is process the whole kit together. So start with editing in superior, then in the daw.


thanks for your reply
im sick with GAS
#5
Quote by josuetijuana
what's your DAW?


i think the Daw does not matter but anyways its cubase 5
im sick with GAS
#6
Quote by lextexrex
It's important to use the mixing tools in superior since you can control the eq and other effects seperately for each part of the kit. All the DAW will be able to do is process the whole kit together. So start with editing in superior, then in the daw.

You can route each mic in SD2.0 to its own track in the DAW. It doesn't really matter unless you like the way the effects specific to SD2.0 sound and in that case, do your drum mixing with those plugins; I usually use the SD2.0 compressor and transient designer before routing to a track in my DAW and applying further processing.
#7
Quote by Odirunn
You can route each mic in SD2.0 to its own track in the DAW. It doesn't really matter unless you like the way the effects specific to SD2.0 sound and in that case, do your drum mixing with those plugins; I usually use the SD2.0 compressor and transient designer before routing to a track in my DAW and applying further processing.



nice idea will do this
im sick with GAS
#8
In Cubase 5 you can add separate tracks for VSTi's by clicking on the [> thing next to the "e" and choosing which outputs you want to add.

I prefer to use it this way because then I can trigger samples from different drums if I need to.
#9
Quote by Odirunn
You can route each mic in SD2.0 to its own track in the DAW. It doesn't really matter unless you like the way the effects specific to SD2.0 sound and in that case, do your drum mixing with those plugins; I usually use the SD2.0 compressor and transient designer before routing to a track in my DAW and applying further processing.


+1. Just about all the drum plugins of recent years have a multiple output option and in order to get the most out of the plugins it really is the only way to work with them.

But it can matter depending on the CPU load. In my experience the built-in effects in SD2.0 are OK and don't tax the CPU as much as my favorite DAW plugins do. Personally I like to use the plugins I have in the DAW since that is more versatile but I also do audio bounces of the separate stems in order to mix it. For some reason I feel that compressors work a little differently on audio files than they do on VI outputs. It's probably just in my head though...
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#10
Quote by Odirunn
You can route each mic in SD2.0 to its own track in the DAW. It doesn't really matter unless you like the way the effects specific to SD2.0 sound and in that case, do your drum mixing with those plugins; I usually use the SD2.0 compressor and transient designer before routing to a track in my DAW and applying further processing.

Good to know! I've only been using samples lately because I thought that was a limitation. But I guess not!