#1
When you go to play the next note? Lets say you were to play the 5th fret of a string, then you were supposed to hammer onto the 7th fret, would you just leave your finger on the 5th fret and hammer onto the next fret or would you take the finger off the 5th fret right after you've hammered onto the 7th?

I ask this because i've seen a lot of people who play fast who seem to always take their fingers off as soon as they go to the next fret and I was wondering if I did this would it help my guitar playing? I normally don't move my fingers off the frets unless I have to.

A song i'm learning has parts like this

4-5-4--5-7-5--4-5-4-0


and

-------------5------------8-p7-p5---5-----------
0-5-h7-p8---8-p7-p5------------8---8-p7-p5
#2
Well I'm not much of a speed player but when you play licks like that it would be handy to roll your fingers off the frets so they can go places. When you're playing that fast milliseconds count, so they don't waste any time leave fingers in places they don't need to be. Just my 2 cents.




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#4
In your first example, you're returning to the original string - in other words, you're starting at G#, hammering the A and then returning to G#. The rest of that riff has the same concept. I would definitely leave my finger planted on the 4, hammer the 5 and then pull off back to the 4. Try it both ways - leave the finger on 4 the first time, then take it off the second time. Notice how your efficiency decreases? It's far more efficient to leave that finger in place, hammer the second note and then return to the first with it already in position.

Now, if you're not returning to the original note, then it might be more efficient to take the finger off that note and get ready to move to the new note. It just all depends. Perhaps you need to do a bend with the second note, so you opt to leave the first note finger in place, to aid with the bend. See why I say it all depends?
#5
Quote by GreenDayFan16
Well I'm not much of a speed player but when you play licks like that it would be handy to roll your fingers off the frets so they can go places. When you're playing that fast milliseconds count, so they don't waste any time leave fingers in places they don't need to be. Just my 2 cents.


This
#6
Quote by KG6_Steven
In your first example, you're returning to the original string - in other words, you're starting at G#, hammering the A and then returning to G#. The rest of that riff has the same concept. I would definitely leave my finger planted on the 4, hammer the 5 and then pull off back to the 4. Try it both ways - leave the finger on 4 the first time, then take it off the second time. Notice how your efficiency decreases? It's far more efficient to leave that finger in place, hammer the second note and then return to the first with it already in position.

Now, if you're not returning to the original note, then it might be more efficient to take the finger off that note and get ready to move to the new note. It just all depends. Perhaps you need to do a bend with the second note, so you opt to leave the first note finger in place, to aid with the bend. See why I say it all depends?


I think he pegged it
#8
Quote by corrda00
Keep you're fingers down as much as possible.

Do the opposite of this. Whenever you're not actively playing a note, don't fret it; to do so causes unnecessary tension and reduces efficiency. You don't want to lift your finger off the fret but instead relax the finger, it comes off the fret on its own.
However, as mentioned above, if you're doing something like: 4h6p4, I'd recommend keeping the 4th fret down.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#11
It can be very helpful to lift your fingers up when you're not using them during practice sessions. If we assume that no unnecessary tension is created by fingers that are still holding notes then leaving them down is the better option, but this is not always the correct assumption. Tension from fingers that are still holding notes can hold you back. Spend some time during your practice sessions focusing on releasing notes instead of fretting notes and your left hand will improve.

When you play, though, just forget about all this stuff and focus on the music.
#12
Quote by dvuksanovich
It can be very helpful to lift your fingers up when you're not using them during practice sessions. If we assume that no unnecessary tension is created by fingers that are still holding notes then leaving them down is the better option, but this is not always the correct assumption. Tension from fingers that are still holding notes can hold you back. Spend some time during your practice sessions focusing on releasing notes instead of fretting notes and your left hand will improve.

When you play, though, just forget about all this stuff and focus on the music.


As Freepower has already said, you don't want to be specifically releasing notes at all, what you want to be doing is simply relaxing the fingers that aren't being used at any given time. This means they'll lift slightly but that doesn't mean it's the same as actually lifting your fingers.

I agree with you about not thinking about technique when you're actually playing though, that's the entire reason we practice after all: so we don't have to think about what's going on physically.
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