#1
Hello there, Wagner here, I'm new on that forum so I need to know how I can play that Chord because I stoped playing when it was on front of me :/, sorry for the english... I'm Latin.
#2
Play it like this:

open 0
open 0
pointer 2
middle 2
open 0
muted X

Or like this:

muted X
muted X
pointer 4
pinky 7
ring 7
muted X
#3
Play it like this:

open 0
open 0
pointer 2
middle 2
open 0
muted X


if the muted x is the low E string, I would change the pointer and the middle finger so that the pointer is on d string and the middle finger on the g string
#5
From my understanding, you cant have a minor chord and a 'sus' chord in one. The sus replaces the 3rd in the chord, which decides the chords major/minor tonality (so a chord can't be both major/minor AND suspended)

Also, sus9 is the same as sus2, as it will be more commonly written.

So the chord you actually want is Asus2.

e 0
B 0
G 2
D 2
A 0
E x


Anyone, feel free to correct any of this if it's wrong... it's been quite a while since I dabbled in music theory
#6
From my understanding, you cant have a minor chord and a 'sus' chord in one. The sus replaces the 3rd in the chord, which decides the chords major/minor tonality (so a chord can't be both major/minor AND suspended)

Also, sus9 is the same as sus2, as it will be more commonly written.


Sounds right to me^^
#7
I think he might mean Am(add9) this will give the 3rd and the 2nd.
579555
X02410
There are a couple ways to play an Am(add9)
#9
Fret 9 (Note B)
7 ( E)
5 ( A) - Played on low E-string

This is one of the ways to plAY it (barre chord style)
If you don't play the major/minor 3rd it's a Sus2 Chord and not major or minor since the 3rd determines the gender of the chord - the B replaces the C#/C.
Also it would be Am9 if the 3rd (C) and the 9th (B) is included and not Am sus9
#11
Quote by Black Hazard
If the low E is muted, why include it at all?


IF thats directed towards me, I always make sure my fingering examples have 6 characters so people will know that the open A is an open A and not an open E. common courtesy. If i saw 02410, i would play it on the E string.... which would be completely wrong.
#12
Quote by Charlie4
Also it would be Am9 if the 3rd (C) and the 9th (B) is included and not Am sus9

It would only be Am9 if there was a b7 in there. Thats why Am(add9) works best. its minor and has the 2nd in there.
#13
Quote by Winsbury
From my understanding, you cant have a minor chord and a 'sus' chord in one. The sus replaces the 3rd in the chord, which decides the chords major/minor tonality (so a chord can't be both major/minor AND suspended)

Also, sus9 is the same as sus2, as it will be more commonly written.

So the chord you actually want is Asus2.

e 0
B 0
G 2
D 2
A 0
E x


Anyone, feel free to correct any of this if it's wrong... it's been quite a while since I dabbled in music theory


I dont think sus9 is the same as sus2. in a sus2, the third above the root will be replaced, in a sus9 the third above the octave will be replaced. obviously, there's still no third played anywhere, otherwise it would be an add9. not sure about this though :P
#14
You don't sus a 9 and you don't add a 2. The correct chord is Am add9 and would be:
E - 0
B - 1
G - 4
D - 2
A - 0
E - X

Sus means you are replacing the normal major or minor 3rd with the 2 or 4.
Add means you are adding the 9 (same as 2) or 11 (same as 4) so the 3rd stays.
I would look weird to write out a chord as 1-2-3-5 so an add 9 is 1-3-5-9.