#1
Hey guys!

Before i get into a big series on writing, soloing and technique practice we need to do a bit more theory to conquer the fretboard.

This video is really important. The knowledge builds from this video into understanding how every chord works.

Which then in turn leads to understanding what notes are under your fingers anywhere on the neck!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCHidRMDf7c

It's a very important theory video. So grab a pen, paper and some snacks!

Pat
Gear:
O'donnell - Cocobolo fusion
Maton - EBG808
Ibanez Stratocaster (1976)
Chapman ML1

Reynolds JFR25
THD Bivalve

YouTube Channel:
www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic
#2
Very nice video; very clear and easy to understand. I'm definately going to take a look at some of your other videos.

I do have a couple of follow up questions. So let's take the G major chord for example. G major is made up notes G-B-D. When we play the full chord we play the G on the 1st string, D on the 2nd string, open 3rd string G, open 4th string D, B on the 5th string and G on the 6th. I know that these are all notes GBD in different octaves, but what stops us from just playing the open GBD strings only or just keeping the 2nd string open instead of playing the D note?

So basically when we are constructing these 3 note chords are we always looking for a way to to play as many of the 3 notes as possible?

How about if we look at the D major chord. It uses D-F#-A
This chord is usually played using F# on the 1st string, D on the 2nd string, and A on the 3rd string. Why wouldn't we play F# on string 6 and open notes on Strings 4 & 5?

Would the rule be that the first note in the major triad has to be played on the lowest string, then the next 2 notes in order in the next 2 higher strings?

Thanks again for putting this information together!
Matt-
Black Gibson SG - Gibson Dirty Fingers Coil Split/ Seymour Duncan 59' HB
Brown Satin Gibson SG - Seymour Duncan Invader
Squier 60's Classic Vibe Strat
Epiphone Electric Accoustic
Marshall Valvestate
Fender Mustang II
Boss DS-1
Vox Wah
#3
Quote by thetalonguy
I do have a couple of follow up questions. So let's take the G major chord for example. G major is made up notes G-B-D. When we play the full chord we play the G on the 1st string, D on the 2nd string, open 3rd string G, open 4th string D, B on the 5th string and G on the 6th. I know that these are all notes GBD in different octaves, but what stops us from just playing the open GBD strings only or just keeping the 2nd string open instead of playing the D note?


Nothing. You'd just be changing the "voicing:" the way the chord is physically laid out.

Quote by thetalonguy

So basically when we are constructing these 3 note chords are we always looking for a way to to play as many of the 3 notes as possible?


Not necessarily. Doubling and tripling notes (playing the same note twice - three times, often in different octaves) will just fill out your sound.

Quote by thetalonguy

How about if we look at the D major chord. It uses D-F#-A
This chord is usually played using F# on the 1st string, D on the 2nd string, and A on the 3rd string. Why wouldn't we play F# on string 6 and open notes on Strings 4 & 5?

Would the rule be that the first note in the major triad has to be played on the lowest string, then the next 2 notes in order in the next 2 higher strings?


Playing the first note of the chord in the bass voice (lowest sound) is playing a chord in "root position." Playing a different note in the bass will result in an "inversion" or "inverted chord." It's quite common to play chords in first inversion--with the third in the bass. Second inversion chords--with the fifth in the bass--are a different story altogether: they are generally only used in certain contexts, at least in classical music.
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#4
Cool, thanks for clearing that up
Matt-
Black Gibson SG - Gibson Dirty Fingers Coil Split/ Seymour Duncan 59' HB
Brown Satin Gibson SG - Seymour Duncan Invader
Squier 60's Classic Vibe Strat
Epiphone Electric Accoustic
Marshall Valvestate
Fender Mustang II
Boss DS-1
Vox Wah
#5
Quote by thetalonguy
Very nice video; very clear and easy to understand. I'm definately going to take a look at some of your other videos.

I do have a couple of follow up questions. So let's take the G major chord for example. G major is made up notes G-B-D. When we play the full chord we play the G on the 1st string, D on the 2nd string, open 3rd string G, open 4th string D, B on the 5th string and G on the 6th. I know that these are all notes GBD in different octaves, but what stops us from just playing the open GBD strings only or just keeping the 2nd string open instead of playing the D note?

So basically when we are constructing these 3 note chords are we always looking for a way to to play as many of the 3 notes as possible?

How about if we look at the D major chord. It uses D-F#-A
This chord is usually played using F# on the 1st string, D on the 2nd string, and A on the 3rd string. Why wouldn't we play F# on string 6 and open notes on Strings 4 & 5?

Would the rule be that the first note in the major triad has to be played on the lowest string, then the next 2 notes in order in the next 2 higher strings?

Thanks again for putting this information together!


I would add that if you play a chord with a different note on the top is an inversion. In example:

Chord: G Major
Notes: GBD

If the first note you hit is a G then is a G major chord (no inversion)
if the first note you hit is a B then it is a G major chord first inversion
if the first note you hit is a D then it is a D major chord second inversion.
And so on if the chord has more different notes, ie Gma7, Gma9, Gma11, etc


How you play the rest of the notes after the first it doesn't count at all, it is just how you play the 1st note, even though they'll be different voicing s of the same inversion.

Hope that helps.


Juan
#6
Yep, that definitely helps. Much appreciated.
Matt-
Black Gibson SG - Gibson Dirty Fingers Coil Split/ Seymour Duncan 59' HB
Brown Satin Gibson SG - Seymour Duncan Invader
Squier 60's Classic Vibe Strat
Epiphone Electric Accoustic
Marshall Valvestate
Fender Mustang II
Boss DS-1
Vox Wah
#7
^No.

Inversion depends on which note is in the bass. Plus you'll never go past 3rd inversion (for 7th chords).
#8
Quote by griffRG7321
^No.

Inversion depends on which note is in the bass. Plus you'll never go past 3rd inversion (for 7th chords).


Didn't know that you can't go beyond a 3rd inversion, I assumed it. Any specific reason?

Sorry , you are right, when I said "hit" I was wrong, is what note is in the bass, now if you play the chord doing a down strum you'll always hit the bass first... won't you?

Thanks for the clarification
Last edited by juanbrein at Aug 14, 2011,
#9
First of all thank you everyone for the kind words,

And thank you soviet for answering the questions.
Thattalonguy had a good point, i reckon that will help a few people mate

The main reason why i didn't explain inversions or added voices is simply because it was more of a theory video, rather than practical.

But I will definitely keep things like that in mind, thanks guys.
Inversions and voice leading will come a little while longer,

Any specific theory anyone wants to learn for future video's?

All the best,

Pat
Gear:
O'donnell - Cocobolo fusion
Maton - EBG808
Ibanez Stratocaster (1976)
Chapman ML1

Reynolds JFR25
THD Bivalve

YouTube Channel:
www.youtube.com/patdavidmusic