#1
Found a new interest in Jazz Fusion. You know those shred-like jazz stuff.
Like Guthrie Govan.

Since I've NEVER played jazz fusion OR jazz, someone please help me get started?


Thanks,
#4
Well, I wouldn't call myself an authority on Jazz or Jazz fusion by any means, but I would recommend the following to help you cement the basics for playing Jazz:

- Learn your modes. There are 7 modes to learn within the major scale. Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian. If you learn them, you've got an entire range of scales that run from sweetly melodic to full-blown wackiness. It's not as daunting a task as it sounds, because essentially you're playing the same notes as the major scale with each mode, but you're simply starting on a different interval. Learning the modes means you can improvise a solo and utilise far more interesting and exotic notes than your standard pentatonic or natural major/minor scale.

- Learn extended chords. Your average chord on a guitar is made up of the root, the third, and the fifth. Learn how to use Seventh chords by adding the seventh interval as well. These give an instant 'Jazzier' sound to what you play, and sound far more interesting than yout standard major and minor chords.

Once you've learned how to play Seventh chords, take it further. Learn how to play chords using the 9th, 11th and 13th intervals. In each of these cases, your taking those intervals and adding them on top of the Seventh chords from the previous paragraph. By doing this, you can take even basic chord sequences such as Amin, Cmaj, Gmaj, Fmaj, and make them sound far more interesting.

Essentially, in order to play Jazz, you need to give yourself a thorough grounding in music theory. Once you start applying music theory to your playing, not just in your solos but in your chords and rhythm playing too, then you'll find that you start coming up with Jazzier sounding ideas all by yourself.

TIME


...I've created my own time signature. Geddit?

Are You a PROG-HEAD? I am.
#5
Quote by j-e-f-f-e-r-s

- Learn your modes. There are 7 modes to learn within the major scale. Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian. If you learn them, you've got an entire range of scales that run from sweetly melodic to full-blown wackiness. It's not as daunting a task as it sounds, because essentially you're playing the same notes as the major scale with each mode, but you're simply starting on a different interval. Learning the modes means you can improvise a solo and utilise far more interesting and exotic notes than your standard pentatonic or natural major/minor scale.



#6
What makes Guthrie so great IMO, is the fact that he also lets the other players shine. On Erotic Cakes there is a lot of interplay between instruments, which gives the listener a lot to listen too.
#8
Quote by Keth
What makes Guthrie so great IMO, is the fact that he also lets the other players shine. On Erotic Cakes there is a lot of interplay between instruments, which gives the listener a lot to listen too.

+1. You can do all the jazzy soloing you want, but if you don't create interest/variation in the rhythm or chord progressions, it will sound boring after a while.

Also, don't be afraid to try out of the box stuff. That's a big part of the jazz mentality, and what makes it so great.
#9
Quote by j-e-f-f-e-r-s
- Learn your modes. There are 7 modes to learn within the major scale. Ionian, Dorian, Phrygian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian, Locrian. If you learn them, you've got an entire range of scales that run from sweetly melodic to full-blown wackiness. It's not as daunting a task as it sounds, because essentially you're playing the same notes as the major scale with each mode, but you're simply starting on a different interval. Learning the modes means you can improvise a solo and utilise far more interesting and exotic notes than your standard pentatonic or natural major/minor scale.


I've got to go with griff on this one. *insert anger*
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