#1
Hi,
I know I must sound very stupid asking this question but what are the difference between angled and straight? apart from the look of course.
#4
I've heard that their is a slight difference in sound between angled and straight cabs. Unfortunately though, I can't remember what that difference is supposed to be.
#5
Yes, you can roll bouncy balls of the angled cabs where as the straight cabs you can't.
Hi, you're better than me. Have a nice day!
#6
Ok, the following is an educated guess and might be wrong:

It's all about sound quality and waves. When the sound wave comes from the speaker it travels across and down, think of it like water coming out for a horizontal hose at pressure.
It just so happens that in colder weather, the waves travel further. That's why at outdoor concerts, the main band play at night when it's cooler.

As a result of this, I'd say an angled cab is like angling the hose from the previous example. It allows the sound waves to travel further. Also, because more of the waves are kept and not lost, the quality is better.
#7
well...if you think about it..the top 2 speakers are angled giving better projection to the sound..and it spreads it out more...straight cabs aim all the sound in place only cutting through loudly in that one specific area.. angled cabs spread the sound out more..
GEARZ

Schecter Hellraiser
TS 808 modded tubescreamer
MXR six band EQ
boss DD-3 digital delay
Boss CE-5 Chorus Ensemble
ISP Decimator
1998 Marshall JCM2000 DSL 100
Avatar 4x12
#8
Quote by conor-figgy
Ok, the following is an educated guess and might be wrong:

It's all about sound quality and waves. When the sound wave comes from the speaker it travels across and down, think of it like water coming out for a horizontal hose at pressure.
It just so happens that in colder weather, the waves travel further. That's why at outdoor concerts, the main band play at night when it's cooler.

As a result of this, I'd say an angled cab is like angling the hose from the previous example. It allows the sound waves to travel further. Also, because more of the waves are kept and not lost, the quality is better.

- 10000. Sound waves are not affected in any significant way by gravity. They are weakened over distance and eventually disipate, they do not just hit the ground and cease to exist. They do not behave "like water out of hose" in any way other than they flow like a liquid. They do not travel further in cold weather. Headlining bands play last so that they will play last, or else they wouldn't be the main attraction, the guys after them would.

Not to be a dick but, That guess wasnt very educated. It actually sounded like you just thought it up on the spot with no grounding in facts at all.
Better, Faster, Stronger

Kansas City Chiefs

Kansas State Wildcats
Quote by airbrendie
Hey guys in the last 3 weeks I ****ed all the girls in this picture, what do you think?

Last edited by VanTheKraut at Aug 14, 2011,
#10
Quote by VanTheKraut
- 10000. Sound waves are not affected in any significant way by gravity. They do not travel further in cold weather. Headlining bands play last so that they will play last, or else they wouldn't be the main attraction, the guys after them would.

Not to be a dick but, That guess wasnt very educated. It actually sounded like you just thought it up on the spot with no grounding in facts at all.


i would have been a little nicer about it, but yeah.

angled cabs point the speakers in more directions, distributes projection of the sound more.
Quote by dude
Oh yes they do


no, it doesn't.

Quote by googleUSEit
The speed of sound v relative to the current in which it is embedded is given by v = (gRT)^1/2 where g is the ratio of the specific heat at constant pressure to the specific heat at constant volume, R is the gas constant for dry air, and T is the temperature. The product gRT is then taken to the one-half power. We see from this equation that the speed of sound is proportional to the temperature and would expect sound to travel faster and farther in a warmer air mass.


you simplified sound way too much to make a statement like that. please don't spread misinformation on this site, it sucks explaining it to other people how you make to many assumptions on how things work
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
Last edited by gumbilicious at Aug 14, 2011,
#11
Quote by conor-figgy
Oh yes they do

The speed of sound v relative to the current in which it is embedded is given by v = (gRT)^1/2 where g is the ratio of the specific heat at constant pressure to the specific heat at constant volume, R is the gas constant for dry air, and T is the temperature. The product gRT is then taken to the one-half power. We see from this equation that the speed of sound is proportional to the temperature and would expect sound to travel faster in a warmer air mass.


/Argument.

Edit: it appears we've both quoted a very similar source.
Better, Faster, Stronger

Kansas City Chiefs

Kansas State Wildcats
Quote by airbrendie
Hey guys in the last 3 weeks I ****ed all the girls in this picture, what do you think?

Last edited by VanTheKraut at Aug 14, 2011,
#13
Quote by VanTheKraut
What?

Edit: it appears we've both quoted a very similar source.


exact same. but there are 2 or 3 other places that say the same thing. but fancy math always looks so convincing.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

"A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem."
-ae
#14
Quote by conor-figgy
My physics book and teacher lied.... sorry guys, I do apologise!

Dont sweat it. Unfortunately, the problem with education in America (I havn't checked your profile yet, but im making a guess) is that most teachers wouldnt know the answer to that question either.

Edit: You're from Ireland, shit, uh. Haha I dont really know much about your educational system's woes.
Better, Faster, Stronger

Kansas City Chiefs

Kansas State Wildcats
Quote by airbrendie
Hey guys in the last 3 weeks I ****ed all the girls in this picture, what do you think?

Last edited by VanTheKraut at Aug 14, 2011,
#15
Quote by VanTheKraut
Dont sweat it. Unfotunately, the problem with education in America (I havn't checked your profile yet, but im making a guess) is that most teachers wouldnt know the answer to that question either.

Ireland actually, I just vividly remember my teacher giving us the concert example and it stuck. He retired this year anyway after about 40 years of teaching and his mind was starting to go anyway.....

EDIT: The education system in Ireland sucks. I'll just leave it at that before I go into a rant.
Last edited by conor-figgy at Aug 14, 2011,
#16
It's supposed to help project the sound better, somehow, I think that they do, straight cabs tend to not sound the same as slanted cabs at a distance, could just be design, but who knows, all you need to know is there is a difference, but not enough to make a huge impact.

#17
They are easier to hear on stage because they are pointing at your head. Any difference in sound is swamped by things like the acoustics of the room. You only mike up one speaker anyway. It's all about how it sounds to you on stage. That's it. Any real differences in overall sound are negated by whether the fat bastard in the front row had a big meal or not.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band