#1
So we've been a band for about a year now. Whats the next thing to do? Just keep writing and getting better? Perfecting timing, and learning music theory? Stage movement?
Heres where we are now, a reference point if you'd like to see.

http://www.facebook.com/#!/video/video.php?v=1972979759625&comments

http://www.facebook.com/#!/video/video.php?v=1966252831456&comments

And how can I become a better writer/player? Just keep practicing and writing? Will learning music theory, and singing help my writing? Will someone give me links to help me learn music theory and singing? I can figure out the notes on the frets but I cant immediately regonize them, is it okay to learn music theory without mastering the fretboard note location.

Thanks sorry if this is a little sloppy and hard to understand. We are 16.


EDIT: In the mean time, how can we fill out our sound more with a bassist and guitarist? During lead parts, solos etc.
Last edited by hahaha15 at Aug 16, 2011,
#2
Wow, I don't know how you got the sound mix that good using a camrecorder at a gig, but kudos. Did you have a recorder hooked up to the mixer and layered it over the video after? However it happened, kudos.

Your singer is great. That's the best part of the band.

Otherwise from a guitarist angle, there's no need for a second guitarist, the two are practically playing the same parts, and that's one of my pet peeves.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
If you feel you're tight and stuff, where you go from here is your own decision.
You can stay a local band getting gigs here and there while having a popular following, you can do the whole "i want to be big" thing, try to get signed, get as big a fanbase as possible, etc, and any point in between these two things really.

I think you guys sound good, you seem to have alright stage presence for the style of music too. You could improve it, but generally (short of stage acrobatics, which often can be a bit much) it'll come with time.

Theory (as much as many people refuse to believe it) will help every part of your musical ability, but don't take this to mean that you have to learn everything straight away, take it easy, your sound is already good, you don't need to be analyzing Coltane's Giant Steps to make your sound better!
I'd say you do need to understand the fretboard in terms of notes as opposed to fret numbers to fully grasp most aspects of theory, but this will come fairly quickly if you make a note of it to do some exercises on it (one i used to do was to draw out a guitar neck (up to the twelfth fret) then fill in every fret/string with what note they are, it helped a surprising amount. Other things you can do is, like when doing nothing, maybe waiting for friends, or walking to somewhere, just think of something on the neck, and label it's note/s, stuff like this I found pretty helpful).

Anyway, for learning theory, there are some free lessons around the internet which you can look into, take a look around the Musician Talk forum on here you should be able to find some good resources pretty easily, but it might be helpful to buy some books on the subject too.

This post has been a bit lengthy, but I'll end with, I agree with AlanHB, if you have two guitarists, have them for a reason! Don't just play the same stuff. You can come up with some real cool stuff when using two guitarists, don't waste the opportunity!
#4
I listened to both of the songs and I really enjoyed them, good structure and a great singer. Yes, music theory will help, if you don't see it as work. Try to think how much it will help everything about you musically, and go at your own pace.
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#5
We recently kicked the rhythm guitarist out, great guy, not so much player. We are gonna start looking for a new one. In the mean time, how can we fill out our sound more with a bassist and guitarist? During lead parts, solos etc. Thanks guys!
#7
You guys sounds good, I would try to start finding similar bands from out of town to trade shows with. Eventually working up to doing tours.
#9
Experiment with effects. I hear using chorus and maybe some delay can make a lone guitar sound more full.

Also, have you considered possibly finding someone who can play keys?
#10
Quote by hahaha15
So we've been a band for about a year now. Whats the next thing to do? Just keep writing and getting better? Perfecting timing, and learning music theory? Stage movement?
Heres where we are now, a reference point if you'd like to see.

http://www.facebook.com/#!/video/video.php?v=1972979759625&comments

http://www.facebook.com/#!/video/video.php?v=1966252831456&comments

And how can I become a better writer/player? Just keep practicing and writing? Will learning music theory, and singing help my writing? Will someone give me links to help me learn music theory and singing? I can figure out the notes on the frets but I cant immediately regonize them, is it okay to learn music theory without mastering the fretboard note location.

Thanks sorry if this is a little sloppy and hard to understand. We are 16.


EDIT: In the mean time, how can we fill out our sound more with a bassist and guitarist? During lead parts, solos etc.


Pretty damn good man!

You have a F'n amazing vocalist for being 16, make sure you don't lose him!

only suggestions would be to work on putting together more of a "performance" all of you need to move a little more. There were points where a lot of movement died off and everyone was pretty stagnate and people could lose interest. Not bad stage presence by any means though, just something to work on.

Maybe some more crowd interaction and don't forget to interact with each other, don't alienate each other and just stick to your respective stage positions, move around.


Filling in for the rhythm you could do a few things.
Get a loop for the guitarist
a boost pedal for the bassist
plenty of bands just solo over a bass line live and it works fine, zeppelin, RAtM for example.


The more you write, the better you get, and the more you will develop your individual style.

As a band just work more on the "performance" and getting things down perfectly.

Maybe think about getting a good demo cd or EP in the works.