#1
I've been told that it's really great to get a good online presence. The thing is, I've been thinking all night how to get my bands name out on the internet without spamming it everywhere (which no one would pay attention to anyway). We have facebook, a website, reverbnation, and youtube accounts, but I have no clue how to go about promoting it.

Any helpful tips on this?


Our Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/thefringeak
Reverbnation: http://www.reverbnation.com/thefringeofficial
Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/user/thefringeofficial
Website: http://thefringeak.webs.com


Thank you so much for the help. We just released a new album and we want it to take off.
Guitars: Epiphone Slash AFD Les Paul, Schecter Omen-6, and Fender CD-60 Acoustic
Amp: Jet City JCA20H with JCA12s cab
Pedalboard: Crybaby Classic, Boss DS-1, Korg Multi FX, BBE Boosta Grande, Rocktron HUSH Pedal. ProCo Rat.
#2
lol, kind of like this, for starters

now you might get a dozen hits on facebook, that could lead to a like or two.

no but, the best way to promote your band is in person, if you guys do any shows or gigs or anything, always tell people about your website, and if you can, get them all onto the mailing list.

there are many ways to do it, but i like that you're apprehensive about spamming. i cant tell you how infuriating it used to be on myspace when a band or an artists i had no interest in would send messages every day, just inviting me to weird voting things and links to their new website or a picture of their ****ing grandma.

it's just about legwork for now man. once people know your band is there, then online promotion becomes effective, but until then, i'd say get local support first. play shows, hand out free CDs, and get everyone onto a mailing list.
#3
I agree with the above. Every gig my band's had have mentioned our facebook and myspace pages (no one cares about myspace, but it's just to put our music on as the masses aren't exactly hip to things like soundcloud), and we get a few likes every show.

We also had business cards made, for dirt cheap, which has all our networking sites.
We don't care too much about having an online presence, we're only a local covers band, all our progress comes from real life networking, but it's helped us a bit.

Just make sure you're saying your stuff clearly. There have been many times where I've thought "yeah this band is cool" but when they say the address to their web-pages it's like "yurh can hit us up on facebook at wurghwbahhlag" and I have no idea where to go to hear them. Practicing mic technique when talking is just as important as when singing!

But yeah, another bit of advice for online networking, again I'm not much to go by, my personal youtube channel only has like 75 subscribers, but I have a few videos with a few thousand views, not a whole lot, but I've got a few things to share.
Find similar people to you online (I'm basing all of this from Youtube, because it's a brilliant way to network a band/musician) and communicate with them, maybe collaborate with them, etc, try to share their fanbase while they can share yours.
Make stuff that's relevant, that people want to see, etc.

It's a case of trying to build up a fanbase really, then all you need to do is keep them sweet and it should build.
#4
Online presence is great for people who want to get an idea of what you sound like. If somebody mentions a band, I throw it into google and see what comes out. But past that, it's not as great as people think.

So sure, my bands have a facebook, reverbnation, myspace, official sites and that's fine for telling people what we sound like and when our next gigs are. But we get our gigs by proactively asking around, and referring people to our sites...not the other way around.

One girl I played guitar for had a pretty strong online presence. Her covers on youtube had viewed pretty high, had thousands of likes on facebook and when she released her first videoclip it had over 2,000 views on youtube in the first day.

Boy was she surprised when we had our first gigs, and only 10-15 people showed up. I'd say "visibly disappointed" would be a good description. The online stuff, it just doesn't translate into real world fans, not ones dedicated to get off their computer and to one of your gigs anyway.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by AlanHB
Online presence is great for people who want to get an idea of what you sound like. If somebody mentions a band, I throw it into google and see what comes out. But past that, it's not as great as people think.

So sure, my bands have a facebook, reverbnation, myspace, official sites and that's fine for telling people what we sound like and when our next gigs are. But we get our gigs by proactively asking around, and referring people to our sites...not the other way around.

One girl I played guitar for had a pretty strong online presence. Her covers on youtube had viewed pretty high, had thousands of likes on facebook and when she released her first videoclip it had over 2,000 views on youtube in the first day.

Boy was she surprised when we had our first gigs, and only 10-15 people showed up. I'd say "visibly disappointed" would be a good description. The online stuff, it just doesn't translate into real world fans, not ones dedicated to get off their computer and to one of your gigs anyway.

This

A friend of my partner (I get dragged out to at least couple shows a year) has a large internet presence. Back in the day of MySpace they had 42,000+ friends, 140,000+ listens. They still get 40+ listens per day of the songs they have had posted for years, their only album was released 2007. YouTube videos with 21,000+ hits in four months, etc.

Every show I have gone to, I can basically greet half the audience on a first name basis. These shows are well promoted, including on local radio (seen them twice on local radio station showcases). You take a quick look and think those are big numbers, where in reality they are not near high enough to support even a minor tour. People forget that those hits and listens could basically come from anywhere in the world and might mean only 20 real fans in your neighbourhood.

You may think that 100 people coming to your show is good, but in reality that is not enough of an audience to be a sustainable band, if they play an originals only show more than twice a month their draw drops substantially. Even to get those 100 the band spends a lot of effort personally inviting fans and friends out to shows.

I am sure that someone here will pipe up and tell me "well, they are doing it wrong" and you might be correct, but from what I can see the band (especially the leader) spent a lot of resources to get promising response on the internet but it is only part of an overall promotional package to put bums on seats and on the dance floor.
#6
Thanks for the response everybody.

So would you recommend going like downtown and handing out a bunch of free demos or talking to local music orientated stores and having them set out a box of free demos?

We really want to expand our fan base, both online and in real life, and I'm personally willing to do as much legwork as I can to get there.
Guitars: Epiphone Slash AFD Les Paul, Schecter Omen-6, and Fender CD-60 Acoustic
Amp: Jet City JCA20H with JCA12s cab
Pedalboard: Crybaby Classic, Boss DS-1, Korg Multi FX, BBE Boosta Grande, Rocktron HUSH Pedal. ProCo Rat.
#7
Quote by Punkrokkboi
Thanks for the response everybody.

So would you recommend going like downtown and handing out a bunch of free demos or talking to local music orientated stores and having them set out a box of free demos?

We really want to expand our fan base, both online and in real life, and I'm personally willing to do as much legwork as I can to get there.


Well if you're looking for gugs, yes hit up venues and hand your cd around. Another good way to get gigs is by supporting other bands who already have an established following.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#8
Well we dont really have a problem getting gigs, I already have a ton of connections with people. The only thing is we want a bigger fan base. We have been gigging since January and only have 130 facebook likes
Guitars: Epiphone Slash AFD Les Paul, Schecter Omen-6, and Fender CD-60 Acoustic
Amp: Jet City JCA20H with JCA12s cab
Pedalboard: Crybaby Classic, Boss DS-1, Korg Multi FX, BBE Boosta Grande, Rocktron HUSH Pedal. ProCo Rat.
#9
Quote by Punkrokkboi
Well we dont really have a problem getting gigs, I already have a ton of connections with people. The only thing is we want a bigger fan base. We have been gigging since January and only have 130 facebook likes


I mayn't have been clear before, FB likes and youtube videos does not equal fans. It's about how many people show up to your gigs, and buy your cds.

For example, again from bands I play with/know locally,

Band A has 1,266 FB likes. Band A has combined youtube views of over 100,000. Band A has been playing locally for 2 months, and the biggest crowd they have attracted has been around 30 people, which included 3 other bands, and their fans/family/friends.

Band B has 611 FB likes. Band B has combined youtube views of about 400. Band B has been playing locally for about 5 years. When they play, the audience pull on average is 100 - 200 people, and this year they supported INXS.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#10
Well, if you want likes on you're Facebook or YouTube page, making YouTube videos is a good idea.

I have gotten into quite a few bands, because one of their member posts covers on YouTube.

So if you want a few more Facebook likes, post some covers (guitar, acoustic+vocals, whatever) and post your Facebook page in the description.
#11
Quote by AlanHB
I mayn't have been clear before, FB likes and youtube videos does not equal fans. It's about how many people show up to your gigs, and buy your cds.

For example, again from bands I play with/know locally,

Band A has 1,266 FB likes. Band A has combined youtube views of over 100,000. Band A has been playing locally for 2 months, and the biggest crowd they have attracted has been around 30 people, which included 3 other bands, and their fans/family/friends.

Band B has 611 FB likes. Band B has combined youtube views of about 400. Band B has been playing locally for about 5 years. When they play, the audience pull on average is 100 - 200 people, and this year they supported INXS.


I see what you're saying, but my band is lucky to get 80 people to a gig, and that's with other bands playing as well.
Guitars: Epiphone Slash AFD Les Paul, Schecter Omen-6, and Fender CD-60 Acoustic
Amp: Jet City JCA20H with JCA12s cab
Pedalboard: Crybaby Classic, Boss DS-1, Korg Multi FX, BBE Boosta Grande, Rocktron HUSH Pedal. ProCo Rat.
#12
Quote by Punkrokkboi
I see what you're saying, but my band is lucky to get 80 people to a gig, and that's with other bands playing as well.


You've only been around for 8 months to the public. I'd say 80 is a pretty good pull (for an originals band). Otherwise you're not going to become an overnight sensation unless you have access to the same funds as Justin Bieber.

Just network more, gig more, let people know you're playing. If you're good, fans will gather.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#13
Basically, everything has been said that needs to be said. Online presence doesn't mean much. My friends and I did a test example to see how reliable social media sites are for promoting music. Basically, we built up a facebook page for a fake band, got it up to about 4k fans/likes and released a song for free. No email, just a straight link to the song. Out of those 4k, maybe 30 downloaded a free song. Yup, 30.

Now, on the other hand. An old band I was with released a 4 song EP for free. My friends and I burned and handed out probably about 100 copies with our name, a link to our site, a link to our facebook page and a flyer for a show we had in a few days. After handing those out, we saw about 10+ new likes, a few new people at a show and felt good knowing that our hard work paid off.
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#14
Quote by lockwolf
Basically, everything has been said that needs to be said. Online presence doesn't mean much. My friends and I did a test example to see how reliable social media sites are for promoting music. Basically, we built up a facebook page for a fake band, got it up to about 4k fans/likes and released a song for free. No email, just a straight link to the song. Out of those 4k, maybe 30 downloaded a free song. Yup, 30.

Now, on the other hand. An old band I was with released a 4 song EP for free. My friends and I burned and handed out probably about 100 copies with our name, a link to our site, a link to our facebook page and a flyer for a show we had in a few days. After handing those out, we saw about 10+ new likes, a few new people at a show and felt good knowing that our hard work paid off.


That's very interesting.

I feel that if my band does both of those things we could get noticed by people more, so we're going to do tons of promoting in our town, but we would also like to know how you got 4k likes on that fake band page? It seems as though having both a strong online presence AND a strong real life following couldnt do anything but good for us.
Guitars: Epiphone Slash AFD Les Paul, Schecter Omen-6, and Fender CD-60 Acoustic
Amp: Jet City JCA20H with JCA12s cab
Pedalboard: Crybaby Classic, Boss DS-1, Korg Multi FX, BBE Boosta Grande, Rocktron HUSH Pedal. ProCo Rat.
#15
I think youtube is one of the most overlooked tools that you have at your disposal. Besides being able to host your music via videos it can also allow you to connect with potential fans on a more personal level.

They can see your faces, here you talk, learn your personalities and if they like you then you'll have somebody that will subscribe to your channel and follow you as you post new music and material.

There's a few bands that I'm following on youtube that will just post daily "blog" entries, where they are, the next show, etc. Or when they are in the studio they'll record the process and things like that. And then they have totally random videos for example. Just some random, stupid videos that will get you attention. And of course have YOUR music playing in the background of the videos unlike that^^^. lol

#16
find an open mic night, and play every time you can. If you frequent a place, and people like you, they will eventually bring someone else to come see the band. I seen one band kinda take off like this, they played every night at a local open mic, and eventually they got a rep. It sounds completely useless, but it seems to work wonders. any other opinions on this?
#17
Quote by willwelsh816
find an open mic night, and play every time you can. If you frequent a place, and people like you, they will eventually bring someone else to come see the band. I seen one band kinda take off like this, they played every night at a local open mic, and eventually they got a rep. It sounds completely useless, but it seems to work wonders. any other opinions on this?


Yep. Playing gigs and networking is the way. I'm also all for hanging out with the audience before and after gigs, I'm not keen on guys who either hang out antisocially in the corner, or in worse cases, hang backstage for the entire thing. You're not THAT big/popular :P
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud