#1
I have noticed a serious flaw in my legato playing.
When i am playing a ascending legato lick, I dunno whether to fret all 3 fingers at once when moving to a new string, or play the first note and then fret the other notes one by one.

Example: (Played using pull-offs)

e|--12-10-8---------------------------------------------------------------|
B|--------------12-10-8---------------------------------------------------|
G|--------------------------12-10-8---------------------------------------|
D|--------------------------------------12-10-8---------------------------|
A|--------------------------------------------------12-10-8---------------|
E|---------------------------------------------------------------------------|


Hope you understand what I am trying to say.


Thanks,
#3
Quote by dopelope
I'm not sure what you're asking but won't your other fingers be in place anyway? Legato means to play smoothly (I think) so the best way is to move all 3 fingers from one string to the next as you do the last pull off. Hope this helps.



Like, when doing legato you fret all the notes and just pull off notes right?
So I am saying when you moving to the next string do you have to like fret all the notes together. :S

Sorry, Its hard to explain. >.>
#5
Well, think of it like this - you only want one finger pressing down at any one time when hammering. The other fingers should be relaxed.

When you play faster the motions will start to overlap but you practice it slowly until you get it down.
#7
That's a totally useless video.

Especially for a beginner. It's not possible to play entirely without pulloffs, and the hammer style requires massive hand strength and independence.
#8
I disagree.
I found it very useful, and it is possible, because it's how I play my legato licks.

But I do agree with it being a bit difficult for a beginner, but I believe it would be better in the long run to learn this way instead of learning the other way and switching.
But then again he may not want to play this way.
You've made me doubt myself.
Damn mods.


Afterthought: And it's not ENTIRELY without pulloffs, i mean, you can't take your finger off the string without a little noise, but you overcome that noise with the hammer on from the finger below
Last edited by Knucklehead Dyl at Aug 16, 2011,
#9
I have seen that damn Harrison video so many times and there is one massive reason why it's useless:

He spends almost no time explaining what he's doing. He comes out with licks and briefly mentions what he's doing but for a 10 minute lesson video... there's almost no teaching. He's a terrifying player but he spends too much time either talking about how other people are doing it wrong or just playing for a teacher. I mean just listened to the whole thing "Garsed did this lick in his solo *plays lick*". Yeah Marshall, that's cool and all but are you going to slow it down or explain it at all now?
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Aug 16, 2011,
#10
I disagree.
I found it very useful, and it is possible, because it's how I play my legato licks.


I'm not saying this style is impossible, I'm saying you can't play everything without pull offs. Even Allan Holdsworth still does some pulloffs. You need to be able to hammer and pull off on every finger, whichever style you want to do.

But I do agree with it being a bit difficult for a beginner, but I believe it would be better in the long run to learn this way instead of learning the other way and switching.


I don't agree - first of all, there's loads of licks where the sound of the pull-off is a desirable thing, and then secondly, the hammer style requires much more dexterity and strength. I'm not going to force all my students to doing a year of brutal hand exercises before I let them play a few easy lead licks.

Not to mention hammer-only on acoustic guitar? Ouch!

But then again he may not want to play this way.
You've made me doubt myself.
Damn mods.


The main thing is you should be able to do both. Watch Marshall, he does.

In fact, watch immediately after he says there's "no pulloffs in this style".

3:36 he plays a pulloff between the 4th and 5th note, middle finger to index. Watch the index - it doesn't hammer. Listen. It's a pull off.

That video is a disgrace. The hammer-only method is fantastic but that's a terrible justification for the style, and a terrible explanation of it.

Here's a much better lesson on it - http://www.ibreathemusic.com/article/111
#12
legato (literally meaning "tied together") indicates that musical notes are played or sung smoothly and connected. That is, in transitioning from note to note, there should be no intervening silence. Legato technique is required for slurred performance, but unlike slurring (as that term is interpreted for some instruments), legato does not forbid rearticulation. In standard notation legato is indicated either with the word legato itself, or by a slur (a curved line) under the notes that are to be joined in one legato group. Legato, like staccato, is a kind of articulation. There is an intermediate articulation called either mezzo staccato or non-legato.
#13
Quote by MaddMann274
I dunno whether to fret all 3 fingers at once when moving to a new string, or play the first note and then fret the other notes one by one.

By no means do I imply that what I'm saying is the ideal, or even correct, but what I would do for the particular lick would be to try and fret all 3 on the high E string, then once I'm done pulling off to the 8 on the high E, I'll fret the 12 and 10 on the B. As I'm pulling off of the 12 to the 10 (on the B), I'd move my 8 up a string, from the high E to the B.

Which feels more comfortable for you? If you can get a legato sound out of pulling off one by one, I'd say either way works fine.