#1
So i have some problems whit my evh d-tuna.
-I can never tune it from a perfect e to a perfect d, no matter how much time i spend ajusting the screw. The screw is also pretty loose, so it is hard to keep consistent.
-I have a really hard time pulling the d-tuna out. It sit really tight in the trem. Is there any fix for this?
-My trem is dive only. To drag it out, i need the finetuner almost all the way up, wich is really an issue. Sure i can depress the bar, but the d-tuna hits the guitar when i bring it back up. My action for the low string is pretty standard, i would say (a little lower for the higher strings).
Can anybody here help me out? Thanks.
#2
Well I know in the directions it says to block the tremelo so you dont dive bomb and break the thing off. And its never gonna be exact from what I've heard from other experiences. The tension is going to be off when you change between the E and D
Current Stage Gear
Ibanez 1987 RG550 Road Flare Red(66th one ever made)
HD500 Pedal
Bugera Vintage 22



Quote by metaldood91
Hi. Can someone tell me which guitars are real 24 fret guitars and which are just 22 fret guitars with 2 extra frets added on?
#3
If you have a floating trem, you'll need something to block it. It will never do a descent job while floating.

Also, you need to fine tune it (with an allen key)

basicaly, tune it to D first, then drop it and fine tune it to E using the tiny allen
see here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cNHEudK9mI0
#4
or you can put a tremol-no or put a block under the floating trem, then it'll work.

As long as it is not "floating" you'll be ok.
#5
Quote by t1mman
or you can put a tremol-no....

This not a plug for a product I have anything to do with, but the "Goeldo (Goldo) Backbox Tremolo Stabilizer has a very good write-up here: http://joe.emenaker.com/TremStabilizers/BackBox.html

The site compares several types of tremolo stabilizers. I have the Ibanez Back Stop in one of my guitars, and the D-Tuna can be used while still allowing you to drop (dive) or raise pitch (if you have room).

Yes, if your trem is very low, you need to prevent pulling up, or the D-Tuna will hit the body. But... that's not the main reason for blocking (or stabilizing) the trem. The main reason for blocking is:
  • Strings are tensioned against springs (balanced)
  • When you "drop D", you change the tension on one side of the equation
  • Now all the strings' tuning are affected by the change in tension


You mention your trem is "dive only". Do you mean that you have it blocked, or is the D-Tuna interfering. Can you post pics of your setup (front/back/different angles)?