#1
im writing a solo in e minor and everytime i try to make one its sounds bluesy..and i never played a blues song on a guitar before :/? is it normal for someone not to know how to apporach a solo even tho when they know music theory?
#2
You might be playing the e minor pentatonic. If you don't play the two notes in the e minor diatonic that aren't in the e minor pentatonic, then it will probably sound bluesier. Try finding those two notes and using them more. You can also try different techniques that aren't generally used in the blues as much too. That could help.
#4
ok a typical e minor / g major scale would be - e, f#, g, a, b, c, d
well take out the f# and the c and use the flatted fifth which would be the Bb jus throw that in there without the other 2 notes and you'll come across something rather bluesy, tho, a scale alone isnt really going to make something sound like what its called, its all feeling when it comes to blues, but yeah, FEEL it and JAM it : )
#5
my b, i didnt even realize the guy above already kinda explained it hahahaha
#6
Quote by akedia101
ok a typical e minor / g major scale would be - e, f#, g, a, b, c, d
well take out the f# and the c and use the flatted fifth which would be the Bb jus throw that in there without the other 2 notes and you'll come across something rather bluesy, tho, a scale alone isnt really going to make something sound like what its called, its all feeling when it comes to blues, but yeah, FEEL it and JAM it : )


I think the OP is actually trying to avoid a bluesy sound. I would suggest the melodic minor scale.
#7
lol yah im avoiding the bluesy solo x), also could i use a meldoy minor scale with a natural minor scale? (well with music anything is possible) but could it work, cause i already wrote most of my song.


TY guys though.


EDIT: i can see how the guy got confused, i was tried when i wrote that. sorry about that.
Last edited by harvestkingx at Aug 17, 2011,
#8
Listen to and learn solos that don't sound 100% bluesy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54cd0rVJR7Q&feature=related Satriani - Rubina

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2_MydEJ35I Gustavo Geurra - Iris

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AaqXNk2jgBg Jeff Beck - Where were you

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUsjURfdQ4g Eric Johnson - Manhattan

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gWHY9pI4i54 Vinnie Moore - Into the sunset

Using melodic minor when you don't know where to use it probably isn't going to give you sound you're looking for.
#9
Quote by Jehannum
I think the OP is actually trying to avoid a bluesy sound. I would suggest the melodic minor scale.

Or any minor scale other than the pentatonic or blues scale.

But that doesn't mean you should never use those scales... Start by looking up the natural minor scale
I hate my sig
#10
yah i was usig the natural e minor scale.


well im kinda wanting a classical/evil sounding sound lol.

maybe i should just do that minor/harmonic switch up , so then i can have two dimished set of notes?
Last edited by harvestkingx at Aug 17, 2011,
#11
see this is wat happens when i get stoned and read fast hahahaha XD but yeah jus do the opposite of everything i jus said, melody is key honkeys as long as its an e minor scale and it doesnt use the flatted 5th hell u should be str8
#12
Yeah just try Dorian, Harmonic Minor, or Melodic minor. They all work over the E minor chord. If you're doing Harmonic minor you can go from e minor to b7, and that doesn't sound bluesy. Also, if you're doing Dorian you can do E minor to F# minor, to A7. Those aren't blues changes at all.
If you don't want the blues sound at all then avoid the b5th, then again you can hit that note and not have it sounds bluesy. It's all about the overall feel and context really. Try having a straight 16th feel rather than a triplet shuffle. Avoid too many bends.
Sweep arpeggios could be used to add badassery, and that technique isn't usually used by blues players. There's all sorts of things you can do. Experiment with various chord changes.
Modal interchange is cool too. That's when you have a main key, like E natural minor, and then use chords from E harmonic minor, dorian, phrygian (very unbluesy!), lydian, etc. at various points throughout the chord progression. This gets you using chords that people don't expect. Like if your progression is: i iv v VII, for example (Em, Am, Bm, D), you could do something like: i IV7 V7, vii (Em, A7, B7, Dm) which goes from natural minor to dorian to harmonic minor to phrygian. It'd be hard to sound bluesy there!

Just keep experimenting.
#13
i like wat the dude above me said alot better hahahahahaha, tho a flatted 5th can make it sound more metal and dissonant depending how u use it, so its a feeling and knowledge when it comes down to it, like the guy said, keep fukn wit it