Page 1 of 2
#1
When it comes to soloing, I find myself always running up and down on scales or playing rehashed licks that I had learned previously, which I absolutely hate and find uninteresting. I would like to play using my own voice, for example whenever I hear a song, I like to hum over it as if I'm soloing, but I can't do that on the guitar.

So what do I need to do in order to find my own voice on the instrument. I know it involves a lot of ear training (which I'm horrible at) but is there anything more to it.

Whats the best way to practice it?


Thank you for your time.
#2
If what you're humming is in tune with the song, it will use a scale, you just have to figure out which one.

What scales do you already know & use when doing this, and do you know these scales in all positions up and down the fretboard?

Do you have any recording equipment? It could be a good idea to record yourself humming the tune you're trying to play, then you can play along to it whilst you're learning & practising it.

Practice is always the answer.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#3
Theory can be your best friend in this phase.

I hear good things about www.musictheory.net
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#4
Start out with a really simple lick in your head. 4 or 5 notes tops.

Hum it to yourself and then try to play it back.

Now guitar solos are really just sums of a bunch of small licks and phrases so by working on taking these small pieces from your head to your fingers you will soon be able to play back what you hum first try.

From there you will begin to be able to hum your solo and just break it down into small parts which you can then figure out on your guitar.

Throw away scales when you do this to and don't be afraid to make mistakes, because they aren't really mistakes. Really it will just be you learning what combinations of intervals sound like what.

Hope this helps!

#5
Quote by vampirelazarus
Theory can be your best friend in this phase.

I hear good things about www.musictheory.net



In all honestly, I'd completely scrap theory in this situation... Your mind is endless with creativity and will not stick to scales. Applying theory to everything you hum may limit you to playing within a scale even though the piece you are humming may have notes that are accidentals. As TS already said himself, he finds himself rehashing the same old stuff. It's time to get out of the box that is scales.

That is a great link for teaching yourself the basics of music theory however.
#6
Quote by Zeppelin Addict
In all honestly, I'd completely scrap theory in this situation... Your mind is endless with creativity and will not stick to scales. Applying theory to everything you hum may limit you to playing within a scale even though the piece you are humming may have notes that are accidentals. As TS already said himself, he finds himself rehashing the same old stuff. It's time to get out of the box that is scales.

That is a great link for teaching yourself the basics of music theory however.



Well... we have different views. I couldn't express myself at all until i learned theory, now I'm more creative than i was. What we must remember, theory isn't a set of rules, its a help system. And who says you have to stick to a scale? I like moving around quite a bit...
Understand nothing, in order to learn everything.

Quote by liampje
I can write a coherent tune ... But 3/4? I play rock, not polka.
#7
I think when I hum, it's in tune, I don't want to think about scales when I play. I want to play straight from my head. I already know level one theory, and some scales on guitar (Pentatonic all over neck, Major, Minor, Phrygian Dominant in one position only, even though I can figure them out myself).

I might try to record my humming over the song and then play that one my guitar.

I know practice is key, but just what to practice?

thanks anyway for your time.
#8
Theory is a good thing to know, but what you really need to learn is how those notes fit across the fretboard and how to play them in an interesting manner. If you've just started learning scales, then you have a long road ahead. It can take a lot of work to get to the point where you hear something in your head and play it on the guitar.

Try this: Hear a phrase or riff in your mind, then figure out those notes on the guitar. Use the scale patterns you've been taught to do this. Why? It will make you a more effficient player. Those scale patterns are arranged in that order for a reason. When you start jumping all over the neck to hit notes, it makes you less efficient.

Also, try listening to songs you like and figure out the interesting riffs. The goal isn't to become exactly like another player, but to borrow ideas and meld them with your own - create your own style!!!

Edit: Another thing that's good to do is download some practice tracks. Several sites have free tracks available for download. Listen to several and download the ones you like. Play along with them and experiment with lead guitar. Like I said, it takes time, but eventually you will get to the point where you hear something in your head and your fingers play it. Being able to visualize the neck and notes in your head really helps here. Learning scales WILL help with this, as boring as they seem. Also, if you can afford lessons, hook up with a good lead instructor for some private lessons.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Aug 18, 2011,
#9
Just a little tidbit that I do: If I'm sitting outside smoking a cigarette or at work or whatever and I hear something in my head that I think would sound cool, I'll whip out my cellphone and sing the notes on a video recording, then go back later when I have time and work out how to play it. It sounds silly, but it's just something to try out.
#10
I do that as well mjones1992, it just that whenever I do that, I find that they either suck or I can't put them in a decent context.

But what I was talking about has more to do with improvising, like some one plays a chord progression and you start playing the first melodies that come up to you. Instead, I find myself asking them in what key is the progression or looking at their keyboard/fretboard to know which chords, and from there I pick a scale and start playing it mindlessly. I don't feel like I'm playing from the heart. Like whenever I listen to someone like Miles Davis/John Coltrane, I keep thinking he's much more beyond scales and you can feel his heart in his phrasings and note choice.
#11
Since you mention humming, my mind immediately thought of actually humming or singing or scatting in unison to your guitar notes. I think that this can force you to play more melodic lines, partly because it's just not likely that you're going to sing linear shred lines. Don't think with your fingers, but let what's inside your head come through your fingers (and voice) at once.
#12
Quote by felakutihimself
When it comes to soloing, I find myself always running up and down on scales or playing rehashed licks that I had learned previously, which I absolutely hate and find uninteresting. I would like to play using my own voice, for example whenever I hear a song, I like to hum over it as if I'm soloing, but I can't do that on the guitar.

So what do I need to do in order to find my own voice on the instrument. I know it involves a lot of ear training (which I'm horrible at) but is there anything more to it.

Whats the best way to practice it?


Buy this book:

http://www.amazon.com/Ear-Training-Contemporary-Musician-Elliott/dp/0793581931

You'll learn theory with that book. But you'll learn more about how to translate what's going in your head to your instrument. Basically, it's a multi-step process:

First, you have to learn how to understand what the tune you're hearing in your head actually is ... and then you have to play that pattern on your instrument. If you don't have a good ear, you don't know how to turn the tune in your head into notes your instrument can play.

A lot of times, when our ear isn't good, the notes we hear in our head aren't even what we think they are.

This takes some work, but I found that it started playing dividends early in the process.
#13
--All you have to do is get your intervals memorized, then when that guitar in your head starts playing all you have to do is know where those notes are. Preety simple, its just a matter of practicing.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#14
You want to write down or play the music that's in your head. That's nothing to do with theory at all.

Here's what I do. It won't work in performance time as improvisation, only in writing time, because it involves trial and error and repetition.

There's a riff or chord progression and you need a solo. You can hear how you want it to sound in your mind. You may not be able to memorise the complete solo. You can break it down into phrases. You don't have to work sequentially from start to finish.

For each phrase find and play the constituent notes on the fretboard by trial and error. You'll get better at doing this with practice. Then enter the notes into music software like Guitar Pro.

Play what you've got so far and imagine the next part of the solo. Repeat the whole process until you've got the complete thing. Then learn to play it through smoothly. This should be easier than normal because you've been practising individual phrases while writing others.

This way you'll build the solo you've imagined in your head, and you'll escape scale patterns.
#15
Balance is very important to good golf swing

Balance is the key to a good golf swing and to be able to hold your followthrough for a few seconds after the ball golf clubs for sale
is gone is, we're told, is a tell-tale sign of whether the ball has been struck well or indifferently.Everyone has their own Taylormade Burner 2.0 irons idiosyncrasies as we saw off the first tee in the Golfmagic Open yesterday at Worksop Golf Club and some proved the exception to the rule Taylormade R11 driverwith good shots from unlikely positions and poor shots from high, classic finishes.

When I paid a visit to trick shot artist David Edwards recently he showed me how correct balance enabled him to playing Taylormade R11 ironsa shot while standing on one leg, even with the ball perched on one of his trick show high tees.Next time you're playing from an awkward lie - with one foot in an one foot out of a a bunker Titleist 910 D3 Driver perhaps - remember that balance is key through the shot and remaining relaxed.Try to retain your balance with a slow tempo throughout. Relax and retain the feeling of being able to turn the shoulders whichever foot you're standing on.
#16
At bottom, I don't think anyone can be "taught" to improvize. One has to get used to doing it through the experience of trying, whether it be over backing tracks or at an open mic night with other musicians or just messing around by yourself. It's a matter of honing one's ears. I can't tell you how to be creative or how to use the tools at your disposal.

That said, in a situation in which one is supposed to solo over chord changes, knowing your theory can help, getting to a point where you don't think about it because it's become intuitive.
Last edited by Brainpolice2 at Aug 19, 2011,
#17
The spam post by kobe111 has been reported. These ad bots are getting trickier....
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#18
I don't understand why everyone is saying 'trial and error, trial and error' If you know what intervals are going through your head its not difficult and doesn't involve any trial and error IF you know where those intervals are on your frets.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#19
Quote by iancmtaylor
I don't understand why everyone is saying 'trial and error, trial and error' If you know what intervals are going through your head its not difficult and doesn't involve any trial and error IF you know where those intervals are on your frets.



Because it takes TRAIL and ERROR to LEARN those intervals and how they sound.. When you KNOW those intervals it isn't difficult because you KNOW what you hear.
#20
It does take TRIAL and ERROR, but you shouldn't try to go from your head to practice learning your intervals! That is dumb, do it the right way and you'll get it FASTER, and actually KNOW what you are doing theory wise, rather than just randomly picking notes until you find the right one. Gawd, people make my brain hurt.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#21
ear training!! spend time working on it everyday. take it slowly tho. don't rush. the point is to be able to hear the intervals and be able to recognize them in your head when you hear them. eventually you will be able to play what you hear and won't have to worry about theory or anything else for that matter. just melody. theory and technique comes in for the execution of your ideas... not so much the creation.
#22
Quote by felakutihimself
When it comes to soloing, I find myself always running up and down on scales or playing rehashed licks that I had learned previously, which I absolutely hate and find uninteresting. I would like to play using my own voice, for example whenever I hear a song, I like to hum over it as if I'm soloing, but I can't do that on the guitar.

So what do I need to do in order to find my own voice on the instrument. I know it involves a lot of ear training (which I'm horrible at) but is there anything more to it.

Whats the best way to practice it?


Thank you for your time.


Play as much as you can, study theory, and learn ear training - the end game is to develop a profound understanding of your pitch collection so that as you hear it your fingers are "mapped" and know exactly where to go to find that pitch.

It will not happen overnight, and if you dont approach it as a process driven goal with several core fundamentals built along the way, you'll never get there - and it will be better for you to not waste your time and energy, and instead find a new goal.

Best,

Sean
#25
Thank you everybody for your advice, I think I know now how to do this thanks to you. I will work on what you guys said.

But I have a question, when it comes to practicing ear training, should I use a software like EarMaster Pro (which I have) or how else should I approach this.
#26
Software would probably be the most efficient way to go. While you're using it you can also try to find those intervals on your guitar.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#27
Quote by Zeppelin Addict
In all honestly, I'd completely scrap theory in this situation... Your mind is endless with creativity and will not stick to scales. Applying theory to everything you hum may limit you to playing within a scale even though the piece you are humming may have notes that are accidentals. As TS already said himself, he finds himself rehashing the same old stuff. It's time to get out of the box that is scales.

That is a great link for teaching yourself the basics of music theory however.

theres nothing you cant apply theory to. theory is just an explaination. it does not limit you in any sense. the only limitations in music are the ones you give yourself. in fact, its usually people who dont know much theory who end up re-using the same licks because they dont know what else to do. as for "getting out of the box that is scales", thats absurd. playing accidentals isnt playing without scales. besides even if it was, there are many great players who use straight up diatonic and pentatonic scales in their solos and come up with very great music.

TS, all it is really is a matter of practice. you need to practice soloing, ear training, and even composing. despite what many seem to think for some reason, most of the melodies you hum are probably not too far out of the diatonic and pentatonic scales. in fact, almost all music in the world uses the pentatonic scale. its all in HOW you use it. to make something more melodic however, wider intervals are used. if you dont use intervals larger than a 2nd, then it tends to just sound like a scale. melody starts to arise when you start mixing up the intervals. when we hum tunes, we tend to not pay attention to scales because i suppose there is no visual or physical refrence to them. we just hum notes that fit. the key really is to do enough ear training to know where these notes are on the guitar. you should be able to be anywhere on the guitar and know what the notes sound like in the position you are in. if you know the notes, then you can make better sounding solos and music in general. this takes time and practice but it will come.
#28
Quote by iancmtaylor
It does take TRIAL and ERROR, but you shouldn't try to go from your head to practice learning your intervals! That is dumb, do it the right way and you'll get it FASTER, and actually KNOW what you are doing theory wise, rather than just randomly picking notes until you find the right one. Gawd, people make my brain hurt.


Of course you had it down perfectly as soon as you picked up a guitar for the first time.
#29
Did you eve read what I posted? Obviously not.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#30
Quote by Zeppelin Addict
Because it takes TRAIL and ERROR to LEARN those intervals and how they sound.. When you KNOW those intervals it isn't difficult because you KNOW what you hear.

I disagree with this. Trial and error is possibly the slowest way to learn intervals. From personal experience i recommend sitting down and learning a little theory and doing a little ear training.
#34
Quote by laid-to-waste
my friend is really struggling with this too. this thread is already full of awesome info, so i'll just give you something relevant:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jt0Dz3fA9-o



"usually when you hear me make mistakes, it's because I overshot the mark or I undershot the mark. If you're playing live you just have to find those notes, and the more you do it, the easier it gets. It is strenuous to hear something in your head and improvise and hope that it's there. It's nothing to do with theory it's a really an hearing thing and an ability to find the note."

So here he's admitting to not having a good enough ear to know his intervals. Straight from the horse's mouth everyone lol.

Makes me think he learned to improvise by playing randomly until he found licks that sounded cool- not the way to do it.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#35
Here's another exercise that can help:

Practice it.

Sit with your guitar. Sing a riff. Play it.

Sing another riff. Play it.

Even if you're just doing two or three note runs. LIttle melodic patterns. Sing it, then play it.

Then sing it, imagine how it'll look to play it, and then play it.
#36
Quote by iancmtaylor
"usually when you hear me make mistakes, it's because I overshot the mark or I undershot the mark. If you're playing live you just have to find those notes, and the more you do it, the easier it gets. It is strenuous to hear something in your head and improvise and hope that it's there. It's nothing to do with theory it's a really an hearing thing and an ability to find the note."

So here he's admitting to not having a good enough ear to know his intervals. Straight from the horse's mouth everyone lol.

Makes me think he learned to improvise by playing randomly until he found licks that sounded cool- not the way to do it.


he knows the intervals by ear. he knows what sounds right. i don't even listen to any of his music or like his playing in general, but he's better than just another jockey that can't play theory. you don't need theory to get up on stage and make 10k people cum with one note.

also, his licks are some of the most famous rock licks of all time. he doesn't know theory. does it really matter if you know theory if you know how to play well and get the notes you're looking for? nope. the 'way to do it' is also not, believe it or not, to constrict yourself to the knowledge of a scale and play based on a template either.
Click here to hear my BOB DYLAN (Blowing in the Wind) out right now May 2k17
#37
Quote by laid-to-waste
he knows the intervals by ear. he knows what sounds right.


Exactly the opposite of what he says in the video.

i don't even listen to any of his music or like his playing in general, but he's better than just another jockey that can't play theory. you don't need theory to get up on stage and make 10k people cum with one note.


You're right you don't, but it sure does help if you want to walk up to some random guitarist and jam.



also, his licks are some of the most famous rock licks of all time. he doesn't know theory. does it really matter if you know theory if you know how to play well and get the notes you're looking for? nope. the 'way to do it' is also not, believe it or not, to constrict yourself to the knowledge of a scale and play based on a template either.


...What? He doesn't know intervals, he SAYS he has a hard time getting from his head to his fingers! Yes, 'the way to do it' -as in making good music that people want to listen to is by playing within a scale the majority of the time-- so you're music doesn't sound like some kid who just picked up a guitar for the first time and thinks he's awesome.

Do you know why we use scales? Why do fifths from power chords? I'm not sure you know, and judging by what you've said here nor do you even care, which is very sad, because you'll never be able to really appreciate the art of making music if you don't.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
#38
In my opinion, music theory is there to explain music that already exists... not to create music (though, I guess it could be used this way). But, in general, theory doesn't create music, it only helps you understand music that is already created.

For example, you could write a cool riff, phrase, etc. without any knowledge of theory, but I almost guarantee you there is an aspect of theory that explains why that riff, phrase, etc. sounds good. Learning music theory can help you understand the music you hear in your mind and translate that to your instrument.

Also, having a good ear will help you too. There are plenty of websites, courses, etc. to help with this, it shouldn't take more than a quick search.

Learn theory. Develop your ear. Love music.

#39
Quote by iancmtaylor
Exactly the opposite of what he says in the video.

don't look at the interview, listen to his solos.

You're right you don't, but it sure does help if you want to walk up to some random guitarist and jam.

yeah.

...What? He doesn't know intervals, he SAYS he has a hard time getting from his head to his fingers! Yes, 'the way to do it' -as in making good music that people want to listen to is by playing within a scale the majority of the time-- so you're music doesn't sound like some kid who just picked up a guitar for the first time and thinks he's awesome.

again, listen to his music, don't listen to his interview. he doesn't mess up at all, and he certainly doesn't sound like a kid who just picked up a guitar. are you telling me people don't want to listen to the music slash makes and plays? sorry, you're right, it's not like he was in a nationally known rock band and is one of the most influential rock guitarists of our generation. my bad.

Do you know why we use scales? Why do fifths from power chords? I'm not sure you know, and judging by what you've said here nor do you even care, which is very sad, because you'll never be able to really appreciate the art of making music if you don't.

dude, i know i sound like a pompous 'dude, music is from the heart' douche, but i do know the basics of theory. i'm simply refuting your post that implies slash isn't a good guitarist or song-writer because he doesn't do it the way you think it should be done. play the sweet child o' mine opening riff, tell me how many people you know haven't heard it and don't light up as soon as you start playing it. i'm not having a pissing contest here, i'm just saying you undermine him for no good reason. also, it's late and i need a distraction


see red.

EDIT: i agree with the above post. very well said, man.
Click here to hear my BOB DYLAN (Blowing in the Wind) out right now May 2k17
Last edited by laid-to-waste at Aug 22, 2011,
#40
What you hear when Slash plays, and what HE hears in his head are not the same. So says Slash. Now, I don't know about you, but if I hear something in my head, and I don't play it right it just doesn't sound right, I don't give a shiz if the world thinks its totally ossum and I make billions of dollars just waking up in the morning.

We're talking about musicianship, not rock stardom. There seems to be a fine line between people that play for others and people that play for themselves, Slash apparently doesn't care enough about what he plays to make himself a better musician.

I'm not trying to undermine him, I don't care enough about him to do so, I'm just using him as an example to try to get people to LEARN THEIR INTERVALS!!! So they don't have to 'fumble' around trying to find those notes they hear.

But instead of accepting that LEARNING YOUR INTERVALS will make them better at what they want to do, they just say 'oh well Slash doesn't, Hendrix didn't, SVR ect.' Its like saying 'Oh, I'm not going to finish high school because my dad didn't and he owns a hardware store.' If Slash had spent the time learning music theory when he was playing that one stringed guitar he would be a better player. Period. Fact. No way to refute/ deny/ argue around it.
What do you guys listen to when playing video games?
Quote by DemonicSamurai

Quote by T3hdude

Men fapping.


Sorry, didn't realize I was that loud.

I'll be leaving your closet now.
Page 1 of 2