#1
Aren't teenagers always complaining about their voices sounding squeaky on a recording? Am I completely weird for thinking my voice is richer and (somewhat) duller on a record? I sound like a bloody newscaster when I talk, for godssakes! Or am I just not used to my tone with those same notes?

P.S. I recorded with a Beta 58 into an M-Audio Fast Track. Dynamic mics are pretty dark. Is that it?
#2
try EQing the track. try increasing the 200-400hz range, and maybe the 6-10kHz range. It might help. or maybe you are just completely wierd ;-)
#3
Why would I want to increase the low frequencies? That's the exact opposite of what I was asking!

EDIT: I will cut some things going up to 200hz, because as far as I understand that's where this sort of honky boomy thing comes from.
Last edited by Cowless at Aug 18, 2011,
#5
I'll warm up to it, I'm sure. Like most people, I was shocked to hear that my tone only bore a slight resemblance to my self-perceived voice. Another thing I should fix is how close I was to the mic. I should have been 6+ inches away, but I was only 3 or 4 inches away, making everything sound pretty bassy because of the proximity effect. Again, it falls to bad mic technique!
#6
Yes, my voice was definitely slightly higher in my head when I used my Beta 58. Then I switched to my EV 767a, and I had my high end and my low end back! I like the Beta 58 because it's frequency response is the same at most distances, though. Earplugs also help bring you closer to your true pitch and tone - I sing better with them in than out.
#8
Quote by Cowless
Earplugs also help bring you closer to your true pitch and tone - I sing better with them in than out.


Really? I've found them to be an absolute hindrance! I have no idea about my resonance at all with those things in my ears D:
#9
Quote by Anexa
Really? I've found them to be an absolute hindrance! I have no idea about my resonance at all with those things in my ears D:


I have pretty resonant voice regardless, but I need to be able to focus on my tone and attack for rock music, so they help me.
#10
Maybe it is different because your voice is lower? (honest question).

In band practice I have to wear the ear plugs and I sing in an operatic style.. I feel really hindered by them.. I HATE THEM >.<
#11
Quote by Anexa
Maybe it is different because your voice is lower? (honest question).

In band practice I have to wear the ear plugs and I sing in an operatic style.. I feel really hindered by them.. I HATE THEM >.<


It probably is that... are you trained? Because that could be a factor.

Myself, I like to sing in the clean quasi-operatic style of Bruce Dickinson, Ian Gillan and the like. Maybe with a little Freddie Mercury thrown in on occasion. It just sort of works with earplugs for me.
#12
I've had about 7 hours of classical singing lessons yes. I wouldn't call it trained per se, I still got a ways to go
#13
Quote by Anexa
I've had about 7 hours of classical singing lessons yes. I wouldn't call it trained per se, I still got a ways to go


That might be it. Have you learned much about trying to hear you in a loud place? Because I haven't, so I use earplugs.
#14
Anexa,
If you actually play out, you really need to get some ear plugs unless you are doing quiet music. there are some places you will play where you won't have a good enough monitor to hear yourself. The only way to know if you are on pitch is to train yourself to sense the vibrations of the right note.

That and you will regret it when you have tennitus. Seriously.
#15
Hearing loss is something that can creep up on you pretty fast. I've lost some from just listening through my earbuds almost constantly, but luckily no tinnitus yet.
#16
Yeah I wear the earplugs, metal music is just too loud.. it's just hard and awkward. Anyway sorry for sort of hi-jacking the thread :x