#2
There's a tab legend at the bottom of the tab. It should have all the info you need.
Quote by Geldin
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Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#3
yah there is but i not seeing ^ , i see /\ which means slide from nowhere but how do you slide 0 from no where?
#4
do you know why learning a song like Classical Gas will improve your musical knowledge? because you have to learn to listen to the music and figure out whats going on. reading a tab is not going to improve your muscial knowledge if you see a symbol and just throw your hands up and say "I dont know". Maybe listen to the song and try to figure out what he's doing?

Besides, people use different symbols in different tabs. some people use a "b" so signify a bend, some use a "^". Same goes for slides (s and /) and hammer ons (h and #). Tabs are good for knowing what notes to use, but the approach/sound should be all in your head.
Quote by patriotplayer90
Lolz that guy is a noob.

Egnater
Leave it on the press, Depress Depress Taboot Taboot.
#5
Downstroke? Just a guess bro, don't blame me if i'm wrong!
Gear atm:
Jackson JS32T
Peavey Vypyr 15
Ernie ball custom's

playing guitar since 20/12/2009

Download 2011
#6
Quote by mell0r
Downstroke? Just a guess bro, don't blame me if i'm wrong!

Yeah I think thats what it is too (never listened to the song so idk)
Gear
- Synyster Schecter Standard
- Peavey Vyper 15

I'm currently using Cubase 5 for any recording purposes.
#7
Sometimes you'll see ^ as a symbol for bend, but given the context, that makes no sense. A slide to zero from nowhere--aside from being retarded--would be denoted as "/0". My best guess would be that it's an upstroke playing the notes, rather than individually fingerpicking them (simultaneously, ofc).
Quote by SonOfPest
Its the Lydian mode; formed in Eastern Arabia when the Persians invaded England.


Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
try the sexolydian scale.
#8
Quote by Jhachey22
people use different symbols in different tabs. some people use a "b" so signify a bend, some use a "^". Same goes for slides (s and /) and hammer ons (h and #). Tabs are good for knowing what notes to use, but the approach/sound should be all in your head.


Pretty much this ^^
#9
Quote by Jhachey22
do you know why learning a song like Classical Gas will improve your musical knowledge? because you have to learn to listen to the music and figure out whats going on. reading a tab is not going to improve your muscial knowledge if you see a symbol and just throw your hands up and say "I dont know". Maybe listen to the song and try to figure out what he's doing?

Besides, people use different symbols in different tabs. some people use a "b" so signify a bend, some use a "^". Same goes for slides (s and /) and hammer ons (h and #). Tabs are good for knowing what notes to use, but the approach/sound should be all in your head.



so pretty much what your saying is listen to the song by ear and try to play it? i dont think im that skilled yet to know what hes playin by just listening.
#10
Quote by harvestkingx
so pretty much what your saying is listen to the song by ear and try to play it? i dont think im that skilled yet to know what hes playin by just listening.


No.

If you're going to be able to actually learn and learn from the song then you should be able to tell what techniques are going on by sound, especially given a tab of the song as well.

Sit with the tab and the song, follow the song on the tab and figure out what's happening.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
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#11
ok makes sense, thank you guys.


sidenote, naming the notes will help 2 right lol? like knowing what progression hes taking and stuff? or just listen to the techniques?
#12
I wouldn't worry about doing it as you go through the song but if you're going to learn it then I would advise thinking about the theory so you know how to replicate the sounds within the song in a different context.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#13
so you mean like that technique with the ^, if i learn it by ear, it will help me a a musican cause then ill know how to use it for my own stuff?
Last edited by harvestkingx at Aug 19, 2011,
#14
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I wouldn't worry about doing it as you go through the song but if you're going to learn it then I would advise thinking about the theory so you know how to replicate the sounds within the song in a different context.



im sorry but what do excalty mean by that? (yes i know theory but im not understanding what your saying lol)
#15
Quote by harvestkingx
im sorry but what do excalty mean by that? (yes i know theory but im not understanding what your saying lol)

You don't need to learn the song by ear, but you should be able to understand (technique-wise) what he/she is doing by your ears. When you do this you don't need to ask questions like these because you can listen to the song then look at the tab and put it into context.
Gear
- Synyster Schecter Standard
- Peavey Vyper 15

I'm currently using Cubase 5 for any recording purposes.
#16
ok so just learn what the techniques hes doing by ear, will help me musicaly?ok i think i got it, thank you guys


edit: i think the ^ means slow down or somthing cause they sound the same technique as the middle one expect there slowed down.
Last edited by harvestkingx at Aug 20, 2011,
#17
.....sorry....for being stuiped.....i thought i understood but i dont, im learning the song like you guys said, but i still dont feel like im learning anyting expect for a song. i know i might seem stubbron or somthing but i like to know how you learn from a song? what do you mean put into your own context? would that be musicaly stealing?? give me and example please


i mean what if he does a technique and i dont understand how he made the noise at all even by looking at the tab and listening?
#18
Quote by harvestkingx
.....sorry....for being stuiped.....i thought i understood but i dont, im learning the song like you guys said, but i still dont feel like im learning anyting expect for a song. i know i might seem stubbron or somthing but i like to know how you learn from a song? what do you mean put into your own context? would that be musicaly stealing?? give me and example please


i mean what if he does a technique and i dont understand how he made the noise at all even by looking at the tab and listening?


Learn the theory behind the song, if you know why something sounds the way it does then you can recreate that sound in another context. As a very basic example, lets say I hear someone soloing over a progression and he plays a b minor sweep over an A chord or something. Once I know that and have that sound associated with a term in my mind, if I want that sound in a different song or in my own improvisation I can say "oh, that guy did that thing, I know how that works so now I can do that!". Same goes for compositions, not just soloing, say there's a moment or chord change or key change that you think works really well and you have a similar moment in a song you're writing; knowing the theory behind that other person doing it enables you to lift that idea and put it in your own song.

Yes it is technically "stealing". You know who cares? No one. You know why? The number of original ideas in music is absolutely tiny. I mean sure, avoid just ripping off whole songs but moments, ideas, movements in a grander scheme, that's fine.

If you can't figure out how something works with a good tab and your ear then you obviously don't know enough and you need to improve your knowledge. Simple as that.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#19
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Learn the theory behind the song, if you know why something sounds the way it does then you can recreate that sound in another context. As a very basic example, lets say I hear someone soloing over a progression and he plays a b minor sweep over an A chord or something. Once I know that and have that sound associated with a term in my mind, if I want that sound in a different song or in my own improvisation I can say "oh, that guy did that thing, I know how that works so now I can do that!". Same goes for compositions, not just soloing, say there's a moment or chord change or key change that you think works really well and you have a similar moment in a song you're writing; knowing the theory behind that other person doing it enables you to lift that idea and put it in your own song.

Yes it is technically "stealing". You know who cares? No one. You know why? The number of original ideas in music is absolutely tiny. I mean sure, avoid just ripping off whole songs but moments, ideas, movements in a grander scheme, that's fine.

If you can't figure out how something works with a good tab and your ear then you obviously don't know enough and you need to improve your knowledge. Simple as that.



you know im very greatful you explained that in great detail and im very thankful and now fully understand what you meant, sorry you had to type all of this, but from what you said, i now reliaze that actually learn stuff from this song i learn some ways how to progress from a major to minor or vice versea from just learning the intro, thank you dude i really apericaite it
#20
To actually answer your question, I believe the tabber is using the ^ to indicate that the notes are played in rapid succession, over the time indicated by Q, H, etc, and in the direction pointed to by the arrow. So the first time it appears, you have four notes taking the time of a half note; you first play the third fret of the 6th string, then the open 4th string, open 3rd string, and open 2nd string. If you don't listen to the song, this would look like four 8th notes. But that isn't how Mason Williams plays it, so the tab is misleading. I'd recommend getting a powertab or guitar pro version and reading the rhythm from the music itself.