#1
Hi, I'm confused about what the Major and Minor scales are? I'm learning theory, and have learned almost all the positions of the modes. If I was playing a Fm chord, would the Minor scale for it be D major? So the 6th interval of the major scale, is where you would play the minor scale?

Sorry if this is all bungled up, I'm so confused haha.

Thanks!
#2
Well you said you were playing a Fm chord, which is a minor chord. Perhaps you meant Fmaj? Because Fm has no relative minor...
#4
The relative of F minor is Ab Major.

The relative of D major is B minor.

You're thinking that you can take the 6th interval both ways.. That only works from major to minor.

example in C major:

C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

A is your 6th interval and therefore your relative minor.

To go from minor to major you simply work 2 notes forward to return to the relative major.

example in A minor:

A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A

C is your 3rd interval and therefore your relative major.

To get the hang of this, write out your scales in all your keys to visualize how it all works. It is much easier than trying to do it in your head because you will be prone to leaving out sharps and flats if you don't completely know your key signatures.

Hope this clears it up for you!

Last edited by Zeppelin Addict at Aug 19, 2011,
#5
If you are having trouble with major and minor scales you should chill on the modes til those are fully understood
#6
Do you understand musical intervals? Minor seconds, perfect fifths, major thirds, etc.?
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.
#7
Okay - let's break this down bit by bit.

Quote by hahaha15
Hi, I'm confused about what the Major and Minor scales are


Major scales sound happy, minor scales sound sad - typically. Major scales and their keys you just learn; C major - no sharps or flats etc.
Each major scale has it's own relative minor - you can work this out by doing an interval a minor 3rd down from the major key; so if I want to find the relative minor of C, a minor 3rd down from it is A...so the relative minor of C major is A minor. A minor shares the same key signature as C major (no sharps of flats) but sports a raised 7th. So from A to A is:
A B C D E F G A
the 7th of A is G, and it's raised by a semitone to the scale of A harmonic minor is:
A B C D E F G# A

^that's just one example

Quote by hahaha15
learning theory, and have learned almost all the positions of the modes.


That's great, but if you're confused about major or minor scales then knowing modes and trying to understand them is pointless since their origin is in major and minor scales. First consolidate your understanding of major and minor scales, know them inside and out before you try to tackle modes - that means some bookwork!

Quote by hahaha15
If I was playing a Fm chord, would the Minor scale for it be D major?


This, honesty, does not make sense. If you have a Fm chord, then a minor scale for it is not D major because...D major is not a minor scale. Fm however is a minor chord, so by characteristic it will best suit the F harmonic minor scale. Also, F minor cannot have a relative minor because it is already minor. However, it has a relative major: Ab major.

Quote by hahaha15
So the 6th interval of the major scale, is where you would play the minor scale?


Yes, this is right. If you have Ab major:
Ab Bb C Db Eb F G Ab - the 6th degree of the scale is F which is its relative major.

Quote by hahaha15
Sorry if this is all bungled up, I'm so confused haha.



It's chilled, dude - if you don't ask you will never know. Theory can be a beast to tackle. Go back to the basics, get well acquainted with major and minor scales and, until then, forget about the existence of modes.

Hope this helps.
#8
Quote by rockgodman
If you are having trouble with major and minor scales you shouldn't touch the modes til those are fully understood



Fixed.

EDIT: Sorry I misread this post.. He was saying this to begin with..
Last edited by Zeppelin Addict at Aug 19, 2011,
#9
One more thing to add: when you write Fm ( with just the m anteceding the F ) it indicates a minor chord not a major. If you are writing a major chord you would say just F or Fmaj. Understand? (other examples: Cm and Cmaj or C , Am and Amaj or A)
#10
Quote by hahaha15
Hi, I'm confused about what the Major and Minor scales are? I'm learning theory, and have learned almost all the positions of the modes. If I was playing a Fm chord, would the Minor scale for it be D major? So the 6th interval of the major scale, is where you would play the minor scale?

Sorry if this is all bungled up, I'm so confused haha.

Thanks!



You should probably start over - you may be going too fast - not a good idea to piecemeal your theory.

First of all strike out the word modes - thats just time you wasted in your life that will never be recovered. Study intelligently, get rid of Modes. You aren't there yet, don't even try...honestly, until youve learned way more fundamental ideas.

Second go back to the Major scale and really learn it - learn to write - spell them out in their correct ways so you can grab paper and wrte them out instantly. Then come and post the correct major scales for A B C D E F and G major. Forget minot for now.

Once you can do that correctly you'll be ready to move forward. If you cant do that...drop all desire to learn to understand the guitar better. Because you aren't learning theory or anything else if you can't do this.

I know this post effectively shoots down everything you said, but its more important that you start on the right foot than pick up where you are and try to stagger forward, so consider my directness a tough-love approach.

If you have any questions, please let me know, and I"ll do my best to help. I mentor guitarists from all over the world here for free, just send me a message.

Best,

Sean