#1
If my band has a song recorded to mp3 or whatever and we want to release it on a vinyl record how would we go about that? And how much is it likely to cost? Small batch like 5-10.
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'
#3
Good question. Me and a mate are hoping to have enough material to release an album on vinyl.

My cousin has helped produce some pretty big albums (I'm talking multi-platinum ones that have been released on record here) so I may ask him when we are set to go.
#4
Had to look up what KVLT meant, sounded like an American radio station or something. No, nothing to do with any culture or anything just thought it would be cool to have some vinyls haha.
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'
#6
You might need to buy more than 5-10 copies. Just google vinyl pressing.
#7
Question, doesn't pressing to vinyl become completely pointless if you're recording digitally?

I thought the whole reason people preferred vinyl records is because of the fact that music was recorded and produced with only analogue technology back when vinyl was the most common media form.
#8
Quote by CoreysMonster
Question, doesn't pressing to vinyl become completely pointless if you're recording digitally?

I thought the whole reason people preferred vinyl records is because of the fact that music was recorded and produced with only analogue technology back when vinyl was the most common media form.


this. what the heck TS?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#9
Quote by CoreysMonster
Question, doesn't pressing to vinyl become completely pointless if you're recording digitally?

I thought the whole reason people preferred vinyl records is because of the fact that music was recorded and produced with only analogue technology back when vinyl was the most common media form.

I buy vinyl because I like collecting it. Sound has nothing to do with it.
#10
Tons of producers who make electronic music cut to vinyl.


People just like to put out something on vinyl
#11
Quote by Duffman123



I've heard dub pressings and such wear out significantly faster than regular records.

From what I've heard when asking the same question, it's only worth it if you plan on doing more than a small batch, and that while I don't think you HAVE to record to tape/ all analog all the way, it's definitely pointless to record to something as low quality as an MP3 and then rip that to a vinyl.

It's cool or whatever for more than the hipster value, but I don't know the price or work involved at which it'd be worth it. Sorry.
#14
Quote by JDizzle787
I've heard dub pressings and such wear out significantly faster than regular records.

From what I've heard when asking the same question, it's only worth it if you plan on doing more than a small batch, and that while I don't think you HAVE to record to tape/ all analog all the way, it's definitely pointless to record to something as low quality as an MP3 and then rip that to a vinyl.

It's cool or whatever for more than the hipster value, but I don't know the price or work involved at which it'd be worth it. Sorry.

Dubplates wear out completely after about 50 plays.


And from wiki:
A dubplate is an acetate disc — usually 12, 10, or 7 inches in diameter — used in mastering studios for quality control and test recordings before proceeding with the final master, and subsequent pressing of the record to be mass-produced on vinyl.
#16
For me, Vinyl is an analogue format, and thus, should be recorded full analogue.
#17
Quote by genghisgandhi
Yeah, but I'm not kidding myself saying it sounds better. Some albums do sound better with the crackles and pops, but most don't.

If you take care of your records properly (and don't buy really crappy used records from people that didn't clean their records) then you don't hear the crackles and pops.

You're right though, buying vinyl that's recorded digitally is kind of pointless. Record to tape and transfer it to vinyl. It's expensive, but if you want true analog sound it's the only way.
#18
TS, as someone who's starting a vinyl-only record label, often, 5-10 records won't be worth the money. Of course, I'm speaking as US citizen, so prices will be different, but mastering to vinyl is different than digitally mastering. The pressing company generally needs laquers or the proper metal cuts to press, which costs between $50-100. Then there's the price of pressing your jackets and getting sleeves, usually $50-100. Then the cost of test pressings, shipping, and all that, $75-100. Then actually pressing your vinyl you'll sell runs a few bucks per record.

5-10 records usually isn't worth it, unless all you want are the laquers, and they wear out quickly.

EDIT: And on the Analog vs. Digital recording thing, I think that people enjoy having a physical product, something they can hold and read the inserts much more than songs they can double-click on Itunes. I know that some of you will be like "But that's what CDs are for!", but something about vinyl just feels more real. Maybe it's watching it spin on the turntable or just being able to say you have it on vinyl, but either way, digitally recorded or analog recorded should be able to be on vinyl in my opinion.
Last edited by BK202 at Aug 19, 2011,
#19
Ha, all the culture talk. Guess i won't be doing it. Its been exported to MP3 but i still have the original high quality 'editable' file with all the separate tracks and what-not. Just thought it would be cool to have our song on a vinyl record. Its already on a little CD with homemade artwork but thought it would be a good little promo thing to send out to our biggest fans of the 150 page likes we have on Facebook never mind.
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'
#20
You'd need to get it mastered for vinyl, as the nature of the medium necessitates certain mastering techniques. After that, you send the master recording to a vinyl-pressing company.

And lol at it being on mp3. You should export all your masters as WAV or AIFF files, preferably at the highest bit depth and sample rate your soundcard is capable of.
#21
<b>is this how it</b> works?
'Slap bass refers to the slap delivered to the bassist when they play too loud or with any kind of attention drawing behaviour...'

'The dusty end, is not my friend.'