#1
I would like to know what enharmonic, diatonic, dominant, subdominant, and what all of that means and how I can apply it to my playing or songwriting? Oh, and what is the difference between phrygian and phrygian dominant? That would be greatly appreciated.
#2
Enharmonic - Two notes which share the same pitch for example A# and Bb
Diatonic - Using notes from only the major and minor scales
Dominant - The fifth degree/chord of a key
Subdominant - The fourth degree/chord of a key

Get a theory book and start with the basics, applying what you learn along the way.

You needn't know what Phrygian is at this stage.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Aug 20, 2011,
#3
Quote by griffRG7321
Enharmonic - Two notes which share the same pitch for example A# and Bb
Diatonic - Using notes from only the major and minor scales
Dominant - The fifth degree/chord of a key
Subdominant - The fourth degree/chord of a key

Get a theory book and start with the basics, applying what you learn along the way.

You needn't know what Phrygian is at this stage.


All correct, but I just want to point out a couple of things, TS.

Subdominant is often confused with the term pre-dominant. Pre-dominant refers to a functional class of chords that move away from the tonic, which you would recognize as ii and IV in a major key, for example. Subdominant refers only to the fourth degree of a scale as Griff said, just watch out for people who use the term incorrectly.

Likewise, dominant can refer to a class of chords that set up a return to the tonic, like V and vii* in a major key. When speaking of 'the' dominant, it refers specifically to the fifth chord. There's less incorrect usage here as the vii* is often referred to as the 'leading tone chord.'
Nothing that is worthwhile in life will ever come easy.