#1
Hey, I'm getting more and more into theory, I've been playing for 6 yrs and I taught myself everything I know. I'm not sure but I think I know pretty much every key of the Pentatonic. I know the Major and Dorian scale but only in the key of E. My question is, I know Jimi wasn't big on modes, so how do alot of his solos sound completely different from one another? When I try to improvise with just the pentatonic it all sounds like the same patterns just in different keys. (BTW I just learned the Major and Dorian, so I'm not sure how to work those into my solos just yet) Any help would appreciated. Thanks.
#2
Learn how to use the modes, eg. using a D Dorian over a C major Chord progression. Also, learn the other modes
#3
Quote by rockstar2be
Learn how to use the modes, eg. using a D Dorian over a C major Chord progression. Also, learn the other modes




TS, learn the major and minor scales. In blues it's common to mix the major and minor blues scales. Learn some Hendrix solos and see how he keeps variety.
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Aug 20, 2011,
#5
Try modal substitution. Find out where all the modes are and replace them with the major and minor pentatonics. Look it up though to find out which scale replaces each mode. You cant just change any of them.
Eg, aeolian becomes minor pentatonic along with dorian and mixolidian and ionian become major pentatonics. XD

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#6
Quote by griffRG7321


TS, learn the major and minor scales. In blues it's common to mix the major and minor blues scales. Learn some Hendrix solos and see how he keeps variety.


Learn some? I know pretty much all of em (a few exceptions) even alot of his concert solos i learned.
#7
Quote by TANG0DOWN21
Learn some? I know pretty much all of em (a few exceptions) even alot of his concert solos i learned.

Then you're pretty much set. Sorry to say, there's no other scale that will make you sound like him.
#8
What Jesse said.

I'd work on your ear and understanding so you can really dig into his phrasing and what he's doing.

If all your pentatonic solos sound the same that doesn't mean you need more scales - it means you need to find more ways to use the pentatonics.

The pentatonic scales are incredibly versatile and useful. I can play you pentatonic melodies that sound completely different from each other - western, non-western, you name it. It's a very powerful grouping of five notes.

Dig into it.
Last edited by HotspurJr at Aug 20, 2011,
#9
Quote by TANG0DOWN21
Learn some? I know pretty much all of em (a few exceptions) even alot of his concert solos i learned.


Well By learn do you mean that you know how to play them? Or did you take the further step and break down each solo so you can understand what you're playing?
#10
Quote by IfellFromHeaven
Well By learn do you mean that you know how to play them? Or did you take the further step and break down each solo so you can understand what you're playing?

I'd say the former. If it were the latter he wouldn't be asking this question.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


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Last edited by rockingamer2 at Aug 21, 2011,
#11
well sorry to burst your bubble OP but jimi's solos consist of many go to licks, just like any player. if you listen to any player enough you will get their style down and can pretty much predict what they will do more or less. jimi is no exception, and this is from someone who loves hendrix.
#12
what have you been doing for the past 6 years? you should learn your basic major minor scales first and minor and major pentatonic. why the hell would you learn something if you don't know how it works and you can't even apply it to your writing?

anyway...i can make pentatonic sound much different that pentatonic..use number grouping patterns do it in patterns of numbers then repeat is ascending or descending then a combo... string skip, use legato. 1 note per string melodies, use different rhythms there's TONS OF STUFF you can do literally TONS

EDIT: ahh what the hell,

stop bending the "blues" note and stop using the same licks over and over and just experiment. stop ending on the tonic (that gets greatly boring after awhile). use mircrotonal bends, throw in a chromatic note really quick then bend up to pitch to catch some attention, people wont liek the sounds but then bend and go into pitch and ittl sound good. seriously i would keep typing but i have other things to do.
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Last edited by GoodOl'trashbag at Aug 21, 2011,
#13
Yes..I think that's exactly what I need to do! I need more ways of phrasing and different patterns! But to be honest I'm not sure what microtonal bends and chromatic notes are = \
#15
Two Words. CAGED system.
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#16
Quote by HotspurJr
If all your pentatonic solos sound the same that doesn't mean you need more scales - it means you need to find more ways to use the pentatonics.

The pentatonic scales are incredibly versatile and useful. I can play you pentatonic melodies that sound completely different from each other - western, non-western, you name it. It's a very powerful grouping of five notes.

Dig into it.


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It's the same as all other harmony. Surround yourself with skulls and candles if it helps.
#17
Yeah, it's mostly blues scales.

Try this out.

1. Learn E minor pentatonic.
2. Learn Hey Joe solo.
3. Realise it's just E minor pentatonic.
4. Realise that scales aren't the key to finding new sounds.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#18
Jimi actually did use modes occasionally (the "Purple Haze" solo being the first one that comes to mind).
#21
The Jimi Hendrix scale is a non-octavating sieved microtonal scale. He uses a lot of cluster chords and whole tone scales too.
#22
Quote by griffRG7321
The Jimi Hendrix scale is a non-octavating sieved microtonal scale. He uses a lot of drugs.

ftfy


sieved
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#23
Sieving scales is actually a legitimate compositional technique I'll have you know!

(Actually being serious)
#24
Quote by gypsyblues7373
Jimi actually did use modes occasionally (the "Purple Haze" solo being the first one that comes to mind).


I think the word you're looking for is accidentals.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#25
Quote by griffRG7321

(Actually being serious)


I half expected it to be, but I much prefer the kitchen utensil explanation for Hendrix's Hendrixness.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#27
That's just silly. A toaster would obviously produce a more consistent harmonic curtain, while reducing unwanted overtones
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do