#1
Hey, i wanted to write a solo for a song im writing and im not sure where to start with it. Does anyone have any tips on where I should start? I have some ideas on what to play but im not positive that i like it with this song.
Isaiah 40:31

but those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.

I LOVE JESUS
Last edited by Corvette_cav at Aug 20, 2011,
#2
1. Jesus isn't real, and he isn't going to help you do shit.
2. Learn your theory.
3. Stop ****ing around and use your pinky to play.
4. Smoke a big fat blunt.
5. ????
6. Jesus teaches us to have no thrift, so give your profit to someone else.


But none of that really matters, since no piece of music you could write would ever sound good enough to actually move anyone or kick them in the teeth. If you really gave a shit about writing a solo, you would be up all night working your ****ing fingers out playing and up all day working your ****ing brain out learning your theory. Good luck getting in to heaven, asshole. I'm sure Jesus will tell you everything you need to know.
#3
here's a better advice.
1. completeley ignore the stupid troll above.
2. learn your scale patterns, so you can play in any key. if it's a ballad, minor and major scales do well. if it's a generic rock/metal song, pentatonic minors are all you need, maybe a normal minor scale for darker heavy metal.
3. the chords. you're probably gonna solo over these, so know the chord changes in your song and while soloing over them land on strong chord tones (notes that make up a chord) such as the third (major or minor depending on whether the chord is major or minor) and the root when a chord changes. for example, you could play a D note when the rhythm guitarist switches to a D chord, and so on.
4. knowing your scales, you can either use what relates to all (play a G major over a G major chord progression, etc) or treat each chord as a separate event, meaning you play the scale in the key corresponding to the chord being played (G over a G chord, D over a D chord and so on).
5. make sure the solo fits the mood of the song. if you have chords to solo over, step 3 helps a lot. if you don't, you're gonna have to use your ear more (you're gonna have to use it anyways).
6. don't show off. I'm serious. don't.
7. ???
8. profit.
#4
Quote by schniepel89x
here's a better advice.
1. completeley ignore the stupid troll above.
2. learn your scale patterns, so you can play in any key. if it's a ballad, minor and major scales do well. if it's a generic rock/metal song, pentatonic minors are all you need, maybe a normal minor scale for darker heavy metal.
3. the chords. you're probably gonna solo over these, so know the chord changes in your song and while soloing over them land on strong chord tones (notes that make up a chord) such as the third (major or minor depending on whether the chord is major or minor) and the root when a chord changes. for example, you could play a D note when the rhythm guitarist switches to a D chord, and so on.
4. knowing your scales, you can either use what relates to all (play a G major over a G major chord progression, etc) or treat each chord as a separate event, meaning you play the scale in the key corresponding to the chord being played (G over a G chord, D over a D chord and so on).
5. make sure the solo fits the mood of the song. if you have chords to solo over, step 3 helps a lot. if you don't, you're gonna have to use your ear more (you're gonna have to use it anyways).
6. don't show off. I'm serious. don't.
7. ???
8. profit.


Thanks
Isaiah 40:31

but those who hope in the LORD will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles; they will run and not grow weary, they will walk and not be faint.

I LOVE JESUS
#7
Don't worry about ringo710; he'll be perma-banned soon enough if he keeps up that sort of behavior. I've personally reported him for both of his extremely rude posts in this thread.

Anyway, knowing theory (especially scales, keys, etc.) will help you tremendously in writing solos, or any music for that matter. I've recently read through some online theory lessons, and I couldn't tell you how much it's improved my playing, in both writing and improvising (and I only recently switched from rhythm to lead.)

Good luck in your musical endeavors, mate.
#8
How's your ear?

Ultimately, a good solo is going to come out of having something to say, musically. A good solo is NOT a bag of musical tricks - it's saying something.

So develop your ear until you can really think in music - not in physical patterns on the fretboard. And then think about what you want to say ... and say it.
#9
Thanks for all the reports, folks, but this has already been dealt with. As you can see, the user is banned. I'm closing this thread. You don't need to report it any more.