#1
Just been thinking lately, i've never really gone for the whole scales in box shapes business, prefering to learn what notes are in said scale, and then just use them across the neck in improvisation.

Would just like to double check that this isn't in any way detrimental to my playing

Thanks
Michael
#2
I don't see why it would be detrimental - if you've learnt all the relevant intervals and can improvise all up & down the neck it seems to me like you've done a good thing as you aren't constrained by the box shapes.

I went the other way and learned the shapes, and I often find that I get myself stuck into a single position on the neck when improvising, maybe if I'd gone the route you took I'd be a bit more fluent with moving around the fretboard.
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#3
Oh, oh good Thanks

It's just this forum's got me so damn parnoid about my playing
#4
Don't let them make you paranoid - at the end of the day, if you're happy with your playing, you're doing well.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
Laney VC30
Marshall TSL602
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#6
There's no "need" for them, they just "are"....if you locate a load of notes on the guitar fretboard they're going to form patterns, that's simply the way it is.

Use that knowledge however you see fit.
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#7
i would say dont avoid them like some people here seem to think you should do. they serve a purpose. its good that you chose to learn the scales across the neck though. usually people do it the other way around and learn the shapes first and then try to figure out how to get out of them.
#8
Quote by Seddon1707
Just been thinking lately, i've never really gone for the whole scales in box shapes business, prefering to learn what notes are in said scale, and then just use them across the neck in improvisation.

Would just like to double check that this isn't in any way detrimental to my playing

Thanks
Michael


There is absolutely no need at all to learn the Box Scale shape system, the way I teach our students fret board navigation. Renders Boxes and the CAGED system virtually obsolete for our students.

Best,

Sean
#9
Quote by Seddon1707
Just been thinking lately, i've never really gone for the whole scales in box shapes business, prefering to learn what notes are in said scale, and then just use them across the neck in improvisation.

Would just like to double check that this isn't in any way detrimental to my playing

Thanks
Michael


Fear not, there is nothing detrimental about learning to build a scale on your instrument via notes & theoretical formula.

Keep in mind though, that there is also nothing intrinsically detrimental about learning to recognize the shapes they make on your chosen instrument.

Box shapes get alot of flak from elitists, but the truth is, being able to visualize a particular concept on your guitar, be it a scale, an interval, a chord, a medieval mode, or any fancy word you can think of, is beneficial towards understanding it.

The problem comes when people learn things prematurely, and/or out of context. That's bad regardless of whether it's a "box" shape, or an advanced music theory term.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Aug 22, 2011,
#11
Quote by Blind In 1 Ear
i would say dont avoid them like some people here seem to think you should do. they serve a purpose. its good that you chose to learn the scales across the neck though. usually people do it the other way around and learn the shapes first and then try to figure out how to get out of them.


boom. as long as you know the notes, you should be fine.

i am of the opinion that knowing both the notes and the box shapes is more beneficial than knowing only one or the other. that way your mind can deal with the notes, and your fingers will be able to play them without tripping over themselves.
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