#1
Hi,

I'm beginning guitar and want to put together a plan to eventually be able to improvise in the styles: Metal, Pop, Middle Eastern, Classical/Folk and Jazz.

For some reason I thought scales were important because they were like "rules" for different music styles. But someone told me scales have nothing to do with style and it's more based on "inflection."

My question is, what is inflection and to be able to play music in these styles, what is the key music area I should hone? Is it necessary to learn many scales, or can you just use the major scale?

Thanks for shedding light as I am quite mystified about what makes a certain type of music.
#2
Well, that someone who said that about scales does not know anything.
Scales are used in all sorts of music. But they are not rules either.

If you know scales you would be able to improvise in any genre without sounding like Kerry King. ^^ That's a good thing by the way.

Learn the major, minor, pentatonic scales. And since you'll be planning on doing some middle-eastern/classical stuff you should learn the Harmonic Minor scale. Just knowing the major scale won't help. :/


Hope This Helped, If not........... sorry for the unclear answer.
Last edited by MaddMann274 at Aug 21, 2011,
#3
^that
i'd say it's probably the intervals that some styles favor some intervals more than others which gives them certain kind of 'feel', but i've never heard 'inflection' used in this context, so i'm just guessing.
#4
First of all, scales don't have to relate to different styles. Of course, you will use the blues scale in blues songs, but you can also use it in every other style.

Scales are somekind of rule. But they just tell you, which notes fit best in the muscial context. It is not, that specific scales should be used outside of a specific content.

Basically, if you've got the major scale in every single key down, you are able to play many, many things. You've also learned the minor scales too.

The key, to be able to play music in these styles is, just listen to a lot of different music. Only by hearing how metal is played, you get an idea of how to play it by yourself.

Hope that helped
#5
By inflection, he meant emphasis. Each individual genre has an emphasis on a certain timing, tone, accidental, what have you.

For example, a lot of celtic/folk music uses an upbeat timing alongside a natural minor with an augmented 6th (Dorian shape, not mode) and that generally produces the desired feel.

As said above, the best way to learn is to listen to the music, then learn pieces that interest you and encapsulate the genre, analyze them, and see why each composer did what they did where they did it, what instruments had what roles, etc.

Scales are just scratching the surface on understanding the composition of western music - without knowing how to using them, whoever, they're just useless shapes on the fretboard that sound pretty.
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#6
Listen to songs from those genres to get an idea. You can't learn musical styles without actually hearing what it sounds like
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#7
yeah i think your over reaching, it's not possible for a lot of them, i mean improving in classical (other than cadenzas etc) is kinda, well, not the point of it. instead of trying to jam along to these things (mashing imrpov into other things) try figuring out what the music is about. that'll be a much bigger help.
#8
Thanks a lot guys, this is really eye opening. What I get is, scales are just the 1st layer, necessary, required, but it ends there. After that, learning "the style" is more esoteric. I need to just listen to these genres, try to capture their characteristics, rhythm, ordering, sheet music. Is there a more structured approach to dealing with this part? Like learning riffs and mixing them?

Jesse, lol I guess for classical it would be anything from tantarella to Greek bouzouki stuff! I agree i'm looking at a lot, but I guess I just want lots of stuff to draw on for creativity? Just want to experiment.
#9
and when you are learning scales make sure you learn them all around the fretboard. Not just the first shape.
Scales = Awesomeness.


Yep, you should listen to as much music as possible, and try to capture their characteristics.


#10
Quote by WulfByte
Hi,

I'm beginning guitar and want to put together a plan to eventually be able to improvise in the styles: Metal, Pop, Middle Eastern, Classical/Folk and Jazz.

For some reason I thought scales were important because they were like "rules" for different music styles. But someone told me scales have nothing to do with style and it's more based on "inflection."

My question is, what is inflection and to be able to play music in these styles, what is the key music area I should hone? Is it necessary to learn many scales, or can you just use the major scale?

Thanks for shedding light as I am quite mystified about what makes a certain type of music.

well this person is right in a sense. however, there are some scales that will be more useful in certain situations and styles. but you could for example use the pentaotnic and diatonic scale in each of those styles and come off just fine. this is where inflection comes in.

inflection is basically how you play the notes. the key to learning a style of music is to listen to it a lot and understand the type of phrasing they use in it and try to grasp the "feel" of that kind of music.

so if you want to play any style of music, you need to listen and listen a lot.