#2
Put ur pen0rz in between the B and G strings.
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#5
F# - i had missed that. that's almost a full octave lower. bass guitars have a longer scale to handle lower notes - short scale models are around 32" where a standard acoustic guitar has a 25.5" scale. you'd probably need a long scale to pull that off with no buzz, and definitely need both heavier strings and plenty of truss rod tweaking, a new higher nut and saddle. even so, on a standard scale guitar those strings are probably going to be like rubber bands.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
Last edited by patticake at Aug 22, 2011,
#6
F#? There is no gauge strings that are thick enough to not have fret buzz in that tuning on a acoustic guitar.

Maybe drop B or A, but F# is just pushing the lines of sanity here man.

EDIT: You'd first have to drill out the holes in the tuners, since none will be big enough out of the box, custom make a nut to handle .015 gauge strings, get some crazy bridge pins, and or you might have to drill out the bridge holes so you can put those massive strings in there.

I don't think you'd have to adjust the truss rod, since if you are lucky, you'll have a decent amount of tension on there.
Last edited by ethan_hanus at Aug 21, 2011,
#8
Quote by Kilty Boxers
Put ur pen0rz in between the B and G strings.


Get out and stay out. You and those like you are the reason I don't come around here much anymore. Maybe mature a bit too while you're gone. Hell, mature A LOT!
#9
Oh jeez me and him are friends I was just messin chill out.
Hi, you're better than me. Have a nice day!
#10
Quote by Kilty Boxers
Oh jeez me and him are friends I was just messin chill out.


And I'm supposed to know that how exactly? Know what it looks like from my vantgage point? It looks like a jacka$$ posting BS into a thread where it doesn't belong. Now that I know you two are friends I'll appologize this time. Warn people next time though ok.

Now then, so that I'm also on topic here, TS why is it that you want to try to downtune so friggin low? There's a lot of problems to overcome getting a standard acoustic to take to a tuning that low without it buzzing like mad, as others have already alluded to. A baritone guitar would be more suited to doing that since they are already built to take on heavier gauge strings and perform in lower than standard tunings. If you want to try to turn your guitar into a sort of a backyard baritone, check into how they are setup. See if you can get nut dimensions, bridge/action heights and so on and see if you can get your's to match.
You mentioned that your's already has plenty high action, but I highly doubt that it's sufficient to keep from rattling with that fat of string on it. The problem is that the heavier the gauge, the larger of an arc it'll vibrate in. The strings tend to vibrate in an elliptical arc, so if there's insufficient clearance(action and relief) between them and the frets, you'll get buzz. But who knows, maybe you'll get lucky and it'll sound ok.
#11
Quote by LeftyDave
And I'm supposed to know that how exactly? Know what it looks like from my vantgage point? It looks like a jacka$$ posting BS into a thread where it doesn't belong. Now that I know you two are friends I'll appologize this time. Warn people next time though ok.

Now then, so that I'm also on topic here, TS why is it that you want to try to downtune so friggin low? There's a lot of problems to overcome getting a standard acoustic to take to a tuning that low without it buzzing like mad, as others have already alluded to. A baritone guitar would be more suited to doing that since they are already built to take on heavier gauge strings and perform in lower than standard tunings. If you want to try to turn your guitar into a sort of a backyard baritone, check into how they are setup. See if you can get nut dimensions, bridge/action heights and so on and see if you can get your's to match.
You mentioned that your's already has plenty high action, but I highly doubt that it's sufficient to keep from rattling with that fat of string on it. The problem is that the heavier the gauge, the larger of an arc it'll vibrate in. The strings tend to vibrate in an elliptical arc, so if there's insufficient clearance(action and relief) between them and the frets, you'll get buzz. But who knows, maybe you'll get lucky and it'll sound ok.

So can we be besties now?
Hi, you're better than me. Have a nice day!
#14
That's pretty much all there is to it. Thicker strings, widen the nut... you may need to unwind the string to fit it through the tuner (I would never recommend drilling the tuner: strings are easier to replace if broken).

I've seen a nine-string acoustic with a low A string. That's a step below a five-string bass's low B. The only problem you would have is tension and the scale length... I assume your acoustic is just an average guitar, which means you would need to use thicker strings to get a more usable tension, compared to a longer-scale instrument. Whether such thick strings at that scale length sounds good to you is a matter for experimentation.
Ibanez RG2228 w/ EMG808Xs | Line 6 POD HD500 | Mackie HD1221
#15
Quote by LeftyDave
^^^ Probably not

But there is still a chance right?
Hi, you're better than me. Have a nice day!
#16
Quote by LeftyDave
And I'm supposed to know that how exactly? Know what it looks like from my vantgage point? It looks like a jacka$$ posting BS into a thread where it doesn't belong. Now that I know you two are friends I'll appologize this time. Warn people next time though ok.

Now then, so that I'm also on topic here, TS why is it that you want to try to downtune so friggin low? There's a lot of problems to overcome getting a standard acoustic to take to a tuning that low without it buzzing like mad, as others have already alluded to. A baritone guitar would be more suited to doing that since they are already built to take on heavier gauge strings and perform in lower than standard tunings. If you want to try to turn your guitar into a sort of a backyard baritone, check into how they are setup. See if you can get nut dimensions, bridge/action heights and so on and see if you can get your's to match.
You mentioned that your's already has plenty high action, but I highly doubt that it's sufficient to keep from rattling with that fat of string on it. The problem is that the heavier the gauge, the larger of an arc it'll vibrate in. The strings tend to vibrate in an elliptical arc, so if there's insufficient clearance(action and relief) between them and the frets, you'll get buzz. But who knows, maybe you'll get lucky and it'll sound ok.



Its a typical acoustic guitar, 25.5 inch scale. Its currently shod with 12's, and I can get it to Astandard without too much ado, at which point it actually feels nice to paly- normally the strings are so hard it feels like my fingers are about to be ripped off. But at F# standard, it gets too damn floppy.

Basically I want something that can go real low, almost to bass tuning, but has a midrangey sound unlike a bass. It also gives me something to do with a cheap ass acoustic that I dont use.

Quote by Dayn
That's pretty much all there is to it. Thicker strings, widen the nut... you may need to unwind the string to fit it through the tuner (I would never recommend drilling the tuner: strings are easier to replace if broken).

I've seen a nine-string acoustic with a low A string. That's a step below a five-string bass's low B. The only problem you would have is tension and the scale length... I assume your acoustic is just an average guitar, which means you would need to use thicker strings to get a more usable tension, compared to a longer-scale instrument. Whether such thick strings at that scale length sounds good to you is a matter for experimentation.


I have no problem with thick strings- I generally tune to D standard with 13's

So il give it a go?

Checklist- new tuners, nut, thick strings, raise action.

Anything else?