#1
Hey Brothers!

My band have written some original material, but don't have any money to pay for recordings
I'm wondering about how to turn my bedroom into a recording studio.
I'm 15 years old, so I don't have any money to splash out with.
I need to keep it cheap and oh so very simple.
buying expensive software wouldn't be a problem, so I was wondering what sort of hardware I'd need.
I.E, stuff to plug a microphone into, and so on.

Thanks for the help guys!
hope to hear from you soon. Nathan.
#2
I guess the cheapest solution would be to buy a 1/4"-3.5mm adapter for under $10. Have a cable running from the output of your amp to the 3.5mm microphone input on your computer and run that through whatever recording software you are using.

Once you have the money, invest in a multieffects pedal board. Look up the Pod X3 Live. I bought mine for $500 but Im sure its cheaper now because they introduced an upgraded model. That bad boy will take care of everything for you.
#3
No offence to the guy above, but that's exactly the opposite of what you should do and a typical trap for people new to this.

If you want anything of a decent quality, avoid mixers (as you may as well just record with two well-placed mics in a room instead) and don't buy a multi-effects unit. Not only are they often not as good as individual pedals for live guitar work, but they're pretty much redundant in a recording studio - they are typically of poor quality compared to studio-quality effects (both hardware outboard units and software plug-ins) and - and rarely have the inputs/outputs and interfacing required (especially as you will still need something to get the sound into your computer that way.

Realistically you have two choices - buy a multi-track recorder, as this is a cheaper option and you wanted something cheap; or buy an audio interface with the number of inputs you require for what you want to do.

I will say this though - as someone with no real experience in the subject, and with no equipment as yet, you will spend a lot more time and money learning how to record to even a passable demo standard and acquiring the gear for that, than if you were to record your band's current material in a studio for a couple of days - I'm sure between you, you could stump up £50/$65 each to put towards studio time with an experienced engineer.

And then learn about recording in the meantime, as a hobby, so you can both afford it in the longterm (and not buy a lot of stuff in a hurry before getting fed up if it isn't for you/what you expected) and end up recording your band's future releases when you are better prepared for it and you guys also have better material (a young band will take quite a while to mature to a well-developed songwriting style, unless you're extremely talented I'm afraid) and will be better rehearsed for a studio environment.

Also, good luck!
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#5
Honestly, if you have Garageband you´re good to go. You don´t need better software than that.
For PC I have one of those Magix Studio discs that does a pretty decent job. (costs about 10 bucks...)
My point is, you don´t need expensive software, it will most probably include a bunch of things you can´t handle and don´t need for a demo recording (I suppose you´re recording a demo, because it´s in a cheap bedroom recording studio). If you really want to become an amateur producer and buy the expensive software, but I really DON´T recommend it, it´s not necessary at all.
For drums, those Zoom handy mics are great. They regularize the volume and record the drums with really great quality, without you having to buy a bunch and accomodate them in different places, sound test etc... you just have to put it about 3 feet away from the drums and it will sound great (while only recording drums). You can get one for less than 150 bucks i think...
Anyway with the adapter in the computer´s line in, the multieffects pedal or various analog pedals of your choice(more expensive), a cheap studio recording software and a mic recorder for drums you´ll be good to go!

Cheers (include a link when you finish recording!)

Hope this helps.
#6
You need Pro Tools because its the best

/Sarcasm

Pretty much what Disarm said
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#7
Quote by DisarmGoliath

I will say this though - as someone with no real experience in the subject, and with no equipment as yet, you will spend a lot more time and money learning how to record to even a passable demo standard and acquiring the gear for that, than if you were to record your band's current material in a studio for a couple of days - I'm sure between you, you could stump up £50/$65 each to put towards studio time with an experienced engineer.


+1

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Another point to add to DisarmGoliath's post - if you decide you definitely want to do it yourself, good quality multitrackers can be bought 2nd hand on ebay for a good price, then when you're finished with it you can resell it on there with minimal loss. It will be a good first step into the recording world and once you've spent some time playing with it you'll know more about what you want to do in the future and what kit you'll need to do it.

If your band wants to create a decent demo though, I'd definitely recommend you all chip in and pay to have it done professionally. Home recording is fun & rewarding, but your first few attempts won't be good enough to use as a demo CD!
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#9
Generally speaking I'm not against the advice to fork out the cash for proper studio time but in this case I think it's a bad idea. The kid is 15. For most people the material you write and the level of musical proficiency when you're 15 doesn't warrant studio time. Period. Investing in a cheap 4-track and learning the basics of recording the hard way (even if that means a shitty drum machine at first) is money much better spent then to go into the studio and (probably) coming out with a so-so performance of songs that will not "live" more than a year.
"If money is the root of all evil, I'd like to be a bad, bad man."

- Huey Lewis & the News
#10
Quote by ebon00
Generally speaking I'm not against the advice to fork out the cash for proper studio time but in this case I think it's a bad idea. The kid is 15. For most people the material you write and the level of musical proficiency when you're 15 doesn't warrant studio time. Period. Investing in a cheap 4-track and learning the basics of recording the hard way (even if that means a shitty drum machine at first) is money much better spent then to go into the studio and (probably) coming out with a so-so performance of songs that will not "live" more than a year.

If it was a 15 year old on his own who'd written some songs he wanted to record, I'd agree with you. However this post was asking about how to record his band - as they're a band, it's a reasonably safe assumption that whatever they record is going to become their demo CD. If that's the case, they don't want it to be an amateur sounding home recording, they need it done professionally or they'll never get any gigs.

If they're only doing it for their own pleasure though, a multitracker is definitely the way to go. I wouldn't recommend a 4 track, they're too limited for any useful recording. At least an 8 track is the minimum, and some of these (e.g. Zoom MRS802) have good quality drum machines built into them so you don't even need to purchase that separately.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#11
Quote by nattyb1
Hey Brothers!

... don't have any money to pay for recordings...

... I don't have any money to splash out with...

...I need to keep it cheap ...


... and then...

Quote by nattyb1

buying expensive software wouldn't be a problem




CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#12
I guess its all a matter of opinion. Im happy with my multi effects unit. It has all the inputs and outputs I need to record. I can get a decent sound on guitar, bass and vocals and record it directly to Reason 5 or Audacity. For drums, I use Reason 5's Kong Drum Designer and a MIDI Keyboard. I have an output from my computers headphone jack, to my POD X3 Lives Auxillary Port, and back to my computer through USB. That way I can record drums too. Its a perfect, simple setup for me when I record my songs for fun. You can mic up real drums or use triggers and hook them up to the multi effects unit as well. Why dont you guys like them?
#13
Quote by chronic_stp
Why dont you guys like them?


Personally, it is whatever gets the job done the best you can.

If it is all you have, fine. Use it.

For a lot of effects - especially the cheaper ones - the effects that are available as even freeware plugins or the ones that come stock with a lot of DAWs will actually be better quality. Yeah, go figure.

That said, I do use a multi-effects unit. It's the TC Electronic M300, and the delays and reverbs are tremendous. My interface also includes hardware reverb from Yamaha, which is different, but again, beautiful. Reverb plugins, especially, are SO processor intensive - particularly the good ones. Using hardware effects takes the strain off the computer. That, and the software ones aren't sounding as good to my ears as the hardware ones that I have.

So... back to whatever gets the job done the best you can is what you should use.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#14
I recored with audacity and just use a guitar chord that turns into a mic jack its simple and seems to work. as for the mics i run the mic chord into a box an audiobuddy box andw hich lts me plugin in the mic and then run a guitar chord from the box to my laptop. Works fine for me