#1
Hey guys, so my band have this song and the solo starts out in the G major scale, but then goes to the E minor pentatonic for a little bit, then back to the G major. Is this seen as 'correct' or 'acceptable' in terms of theory? Can anyone give me more examples of scale switching during songs?
#2
If it sounds cool, doesn't matter
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#3
well they are relative to each other

and everything is acceptable in music

i dont feel like listing a bunch of songs that switch scales in it
but i do it a bit in the song"cloudy day" in my youtube channel
#4
I do this all the time in my songs. If it works, do it.
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#6
Yeah I think it's the same scale?

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#9
should be fine

good luck at your gig
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#10
Yeah, Em and G are relative so it's fine. Not to mention I try to take less notice of scales sometimes. I've written solos that go to C from Dm and even then I'll put a few F#s in for the lulz.

Don't get too hung up on scales. If it sounds good, what's the problem?
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#11
Everyone who's saying "it's relative" is wrong. There is no debate, no reasoning that you can bring to this: you are wrong.

TS: If the song is in G major then you're just playing G major. Unless there's an actual key change, a proper modulation, in the song then it's all G major. The notes that are in Em pentatonic are also in G major, true, but just because it looks like E minor pentatonic to you doesn't mean it is.

If you really want to be properly pedantic about it then you could say you're using G major pentatonic but since the pentatonics are just the diatonic scales with all the risk taken out... it's all G major.
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#12
Zaphod wins...flawless victory.

All this "playing the realtive major/minor" bollocks is just that, bollocks.

Your chord progression defines your tonal centre, and that in turn defines the root of any scales you will be using.

If the piece resolves to G major then the notes E F# G A B C D are the G major scale. Where you start playing, finish playing or whaterver order you play them in or pattern you us...it's all irrelevant. Unless you change that underlying harmony by re-arranging the chords to force the resolution elsewhere you won't change the tonal centre and those notes won't stop being G major
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#13
Zaphod and Steven, I love you guys. I was about making a long explanation how the "relative" was BS but you made an amazing job in doing so. Instead of the explanation you two derserve the official seal of basic music knowledge. xD
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#14
Zap and the Bird are right. It's not about positions, it's about notes and keys. Wish I could say more but they nailed it.
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