#1
Hello guys.

I'm not new to drums, but just now I'm starting to have a problem I thought I would've had before, blistering. How can you avoid blistering? And if you have blisters/blood blisters, how do you prevent them for bursting, or take care of them if they already did? I ask this so I can keep on playing.

I know that gloves could be an option, but not for me by now, so I've been puting band-aids and little bandages as to keep playing.

Can you help me?
Quote by Victory2134
You're just so energetic and cute. Exactly what I want in a pet squirrel, except you're a person.



I kindly ask you to correct my grammar. And also to smile.
#2
I just started drums as well and have the same problem. I tend to stop before full blisters form and give my hands a few hours break, that seems to work. When I do get blisters though, I burst them, it hurts like a bitch for a day, but then they callous and I'm good to go.
For Frodo!
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
No because a world full of marbles silly man is just as real as a half empty glass of microwaved nesquik.
#3
Just play through them. Pop them, clean them and then bandage...like guitar, you'll develope calluses. It all depends on how you hold the sticks, some people dont get them but others do. When I first started drums, I never got them, but a little while back I kinda changed my technique, and for a week or so I got some nasty ones on the under side of my fingers, in that second section/knuckle.
#4
I used to get a blister under my middle finger, but after adjusting my technique it went away. But from what I've always been told getting blisters isn't actually normal.

Its been a while since I last watched it so I might have it a little off, but in Jojo Mayers DVD he talks about it and he reckons it because when you hit the drum that is where your hand is taking all the force from the rebound of the drum hit. I'd recommend it if you don't have it, great DVD on hand technique.

Where abouts are you getting blisters out of curiosity?
Spiraling Up Through the Crack in the Sky...

...Leaving Material World Behind...


SOUNDCLOUD

GT - Elite Curbstomp
#5
The base of the middle and ring finger, the tip of my left thumb, and random places along my fingers.

But, why am I getting blisters at this stage? A teacher at school who is also a fireman forced me to bandage 3 blisters right to each other so I could play
Quote by Victory2134
You're just so energetic and cute. Exactly what I want in a pet squirrel, except you're a person.



I kindly ask you to correct my grammar. And also to smile.
#6
Thats pretty random Unless its not the drumming thats causing it? No idea I'm afraid.
Spiraling Up Through the Crack in the Sky...

...Leaving Material World Behind...


SOUNDCLOUD

GT - Elite Curbstomp
#7
I can kinda understand the blisters at the base of your fingers...but not sure about the one on the tip of your thumb...? Unless your pinching the stick between your thumb and pointer finger...dont wanna do that. Also, ha...what do you mean taping 3 blisters together? Theyre removable?
#8
Sorry, I meant they are right next to each other, forming a massive blister .
Quote by Victory2134
You're just so energetic and cute. Exactly what I want in a pet squirrel, except you're a person.



I kindly ask you to correct my grammar. And also to smile.
#9
A blister is a small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin, typically caused by forceful rubbing (friction), burning, freezing, chemical exposure or infection. Most blisters are filled with a clear fluid called serum or plasma. However, blisters can be filled with blood (known as blood blisters) or with pus (if they become infected).
The word "blister" entered English in the 14th century. It came fromA blister may form when the skin has been damaged by friction or rubbing, heat, cold or chemical exposure. Fluid collects between the epidermis—the upper layer of the skin--and the layers below. This fluid cushions the tissue underneath, protecting it from further damage and allowing it to heal. the Middle Dutch "bluyster", and was a modification of the Old French "blostre" which meant a leprous nodule—a rise in the skin due to leprosy.
#10
Quote by NUMAS
Hello guys.

I'm not new to drums, but just now I'm starting to have a problem I thought I would've had before, blistering. How can you avoid blistering? And if you have blisters/blood blisters, how do you prevent them for bursting, or take care of them if they already did? I ask this so I can keep on playing.

I know that gloves could be an option, but not for me by now, so I've been puting band-aids and little bandages as to keep playing.

Can you help me?
I've never had a blister, so I can't really comment on how to remedy them, however I will say that you should not have problems with blisters unless you're actively gripping the stick very hard, which is a bad thing. Your grip should be so relaxed that someone could basically just pull it out of your hand without any effort.

However, I don't know if that's the case or not, of course, so you'll have to be your own critic on whether you're gripping it too hard or not.
#11
Thanks a lot, guys. Specially you, Steve.

Thankfully, it wasn't drumming what was causing the blisters, it was a skin disease I'm all okay now, but thanks a lot everyone.
Quote by Victory2134
You're just so energetic and cute. Exactly what I want in a pet squirrel, except you're a person.



I kindly ask you to correct my grammar. And also to smile.
#12
A blister is a small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin, typically caused by forceful rubbing (friction), burning, freezing, chemical exposure or infection. Most blisters are filled with a clear fluid called serum or plasma. However, blisters can be filled with blood (known as blood blisters) or with pus (if they become infected).
The word "blister" entered English in the 14th century. It came from the Middle Dutch "bluyster", and was a modification of the Old French "blostre" which meant a leprous nodule—a rise in the skin due to leprosy.
#13
in case you ever do get blisters from drumming, maybe try less finger power behind the stick and more wrist and arm action. i used to get really bad blisters when I was playing with my band in high school. but i also played percussion for 4 years in middle/high school so I was all about the proper technique. i brought that over to the kit which meant i was getting as much power as i could from my fingers and using my wrists and arms a lot less. that was 7-8 years ago and nowadays im noticing that i dont hardly get blisters. a few years ago i started making a conscious effort to incorporate more wrist action.

if you do get them, i suggest not picking at them. eventually they will drain and you'll get a nice callous (callus?) where the blister was, and thats just a nice thick protective layer of skin.


7 String+ ERG Legion!!

LTD Snakebyte
Agile AL-727
ESP Horizon
Warmoth Swirled 7
Schecter C-1 Classic
Frankentele
Laney Ironheart 60w + Avatar Cab

#15
Even when I played guitar, I never got calluses. My skin is messed up.
Quote by Victory2134
You're just so energetic and cute. Exactly what I want in a pet squirrel, except you're a person.



I kindly ask you to correct my grammar. And also to smile.
#16
Try changing sticks first. If you're using a unfinished hickory stick, try a finished one or finished oak.
I love all 5 (sold a couple) of my Carvin X-100b's.
#17
That also helps a lot. Thanks man.
Quote by Victory2134
You're just so energetic and cute. Exactly what I want in a pet squirrel, except you're a person.



I kindly ask you to correct my grammar. And also to smile.
#18
I always get the spots on the thumb side of my index fingers that look and feel like a bruise on an apple. After a day or two they'll peel. Its gross.

ReEDIT: Wrong thread.
Last edited by FrauVfromPoB at Sep 17, 2011,
#19
Never had a blister from drumming. When I started drumming I had 2 or 3 lessons to help me with basic technique. I'm thinking that part of the reason I've never had blisters is down to the way I was taught to hold the sticks.
Not taking any online orders.
#20
A blister is a small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin, typically caused by forceful rubbing (friction), burning, freezing, chemical exposure or infection. Most blisters are filled with a clear fluid called serum or plasma. However, blisters can be filled with blood (known as blood blisters) or with pus (if they become infected).The word "blister" entered English in the 14th century. It came from the Middle Dutch "bluyster", and was a modification of the Old French "blostre" which meant a leprous nodule—a rise in the skin due to leprosy.Blistering is small bubbles formed within paper by an offset heatset press oven. It happens due to moisture from the paper not being able to escape through the porous coating of the paper quickly enough. There are various remedies to fix the problem.
#21
Blistering, founded in 1998, is an international online magazine dedicated to heavy metal and hard rock music. Its editor-in-chief is David E. Gehlke, an American music journalist who has written for About.com, Metal Maniacs, and Throat Culture. Blistering has been cited as a source on heavy metal by the Chicago Sun-Times,Charleston's The Post and Courier, The Washington Times, Blabbermouth.net, The Current,and Pegasus News.
#22
man up and chew off those blisters
Squier Classic Vibe Custom
Vox Pathfinder 15R
Fender Jazz Bass