#1
So, my dad has this old Washburn acoustic. This thing has major action problems. Its worst from the 4th fret to the 8th.

I'm wondering If I should adjust the truss rod, because the saddle is already as low as it can possible go. (without the strings hitting the bridge itself) Other than that the nut could be adjusted, but that isn't where the action problem is...
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#2
sounds like the guitar may need a neck reset, which isn't uncommon with guitars that age. using the truss rod may not make this much better, and if the guitar is old, it may not have a 2 way truss rod, so what you do may not be "un-doable". on the other hand, if it's that hard to play, no sense in not giving it a shot. just keep in mind that this may not be fixable without "surgery" on the guitar. you might want to let a luthier take a look at it for you before you do anything.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#3
Already have. And what is a neck reset? By the way, not sure what you mean by 2-way truss rod either. It has one allen wrench key hole under the end of the neck in the soundhole.
~~~...:::My Gear:::...~~~
~.:.ESP LTD H-1001FM.:.~
~.:.Peavey Vypyr 15W.:.~
~.:.DigiTech RP355.:.~
~.:.Roland MicroCube.:.~
#4
what is a neck reset? i'll let frank ford explain, and he'll do a better job than i could
http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/NeckAngle/neckangle.html

in many older guitars - and some really cheap new guitars - you could only turn the truss rod one way. if you turned it too far, you could not turn it back.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#5
Quote by patticake
in many older guitars - and some really cheap new guitars - you could only turn the truss rod one way. if you turned it too far, you could not turn it back.



That's not entirely correct. You can back off a one-way, or single acting, truss rod, it's just that it will not have any push/pull in the opposite direction. This does not mean that the truss can't be backed off if adjusted too far. If cranked all the way to the end of it's threads and jammed in place, it could stick yes, but that goes with anything that has a limited number of threads. When tension is removed from a one-way truss, the pull of the strings will act on the neck to change relief.
A double acting truss rod will work in both the push/pull directions, compressing or stretching the neck as needed to adjust relief. This style is better as it provides for more constant and accurate adjustments.
#6
okay, i'll keep that in mind. thanks for the info!

Quote by LeftyDave
That's not entirely correct. You can back off a one-way, or single acting, truss rod, it's just that it will not have any push/pull in the opposite direction. This does not mean that the truss can't be backed off if adjusted too far. If cranked all the way to the end of it's threads and jammed in place, it could stick yes, but that goes with anything that has a limited number of threads. When tension is removed from a one-way truss, the pull of the strings will act on the neck to change relief.
A double acting truss rod will work in both the push/pull directions, compressing or stretching the neck as needed to adjust relief. This style is better as it provides for more constant and accurate adjustments.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!