#1
I just bought an Jackson RR3, and I'm thinking of changing string gauge to 0.012 - 0.056 Daddario. Or is it any other gauge you guys can recommend? I play Gorgoroth, Watain and Mayhem, mostly in E standard.


All informative answers are appreciated


P.S
Im sorry if there's any other thread with this topic.
#2
gauge is irrelevant to playing style overall. lighter strings make it easy to play SUph3R faaaasssstttt!!!!!!1!, but it can be a bit of a cripple for some shredders when the realize they can't play like that on a guitar with .13's.

.12 gauge strings are good. fairly heavy to most, but comfortable. You will need a set up to get it. For E standard, the strings will be quite taut: you may have to work on barre chords a bit.
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#4
Quote by Fluffetftw
and I'm thinking of changing string gauge to 0.012 - 0.056 .. mostly in E standard.


that's pretty heavy for E standard dude, i'd say 50 at the most for that.. i'd use a 56 for drop d or drop c#
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#5
I'd personally use 10s on a "normal" (25,5 scale) and 11s on a "shorter" (24,75 scale, LP for example). 12s would be extremely tight for E standard, yeah.
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Last edited by Sakke at Aug 24, 2011,
#6
E Standard shouldn't really go thicker than 10 - 52....if you drop tune or a lower standard tuning is when you want to look at thicker gauge strings. Be prepared to adjust your truss rod, etc. when you put those heavy gauges on there...if you haven't done it before, it can seriously jack up your action and intonation until you've reset it all...
#7
I typed wrong, its suppose to be 0.012 - 0.052.
Yeah its tight when its in E standard, but I want to be able to tune down to like D without changing strings.
#8
Quote by Sakke
12s would be extremely tight for E standard, yeah.

No. 14's would be extremely tight. .12's are only extremely tight in E standard if you have only ever played on .9's.
Quote by katalyzt13
E Standard shouldn't really go thicker than 10 - 52..

No. Tell that to most acoustic guitars, and players who use .11's and above.

OP: Okay, some people are overexaggerating to ridiculous proportions here, so before people tell you that .12's are like playing strings thick as barbed wire or some other BS: heavier strings are an acquired taste, and if you don't mind the strings you have at the moment, you don't necessarily need to change them. Some people find .10 gauge strings floppy. I hate them; I have gotten "used" to them (and I suppose have taken a liking to them) as I can't afford a setup on my latest purchase, but I love .11's and above and usually stick with .12's and .13's.

It is preferential, and you can use whatever gauge and tuning you like. Try a guitar with heavier strings and see if you like the extra tension. Don't do it without trying it, because you could really, really regret it.

Oh, and with tighter strings, you might want to have a low-ish action to compensate for the tension: using .12's in standard with a high action can be a pain in the arse
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Last edited by Banjocal at Aug 24, 2011,
#9
Bear in mind that, with 12s, you might have to file the nut a little bit as well. Although for electric guitar, I would personally stick with 11s.
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#10
Quote by Banjocal
No. Tell that to most acoustic guitars, and players who use .11's and above.


Yes, because we were talking about acoustic guitars...

While it isn't impossible to use higher gauge strings in E Standard, at some point it quits making sense to me as you are putting all of this tension on the neck of your instrument when it isn't necessary. I understand some people like thicker gauges, but it will absolutely require a new set up including adjusting the truss rod and intonation. Also, you would want to detune your guitar before you put it up every time because it can't be doing good things for the neck to have that much tension on it just sitting there. I have a friend who used to use 12 - 56 (with a wound 3rd) in standard tuning and he quit because he said it was warping his guitar necks because he was forgetting to detune when he put his guitars up. (Also, as mentioned, your nut grooves may need to be expanded for thicker gauges, etc.)

There are some people in the school of thought that REAL MEN use super thick gauges, etc., but I think that is a bunch of baloney. My prime concerns are that I'm getting good tone, it is comfortable to play, and I'm not damaging my instrument.

On the other hand, if you are going to drop tune to C# or lower, or a standard tuning below D standard, then you absolutely need thicker gauges or you are gonna have too much floppiness in your strings.
#11
Quote by katalyzt13
Yes, because we were talking about acoustic guitars...

While it isn't impossible to use higher gauge strings in E Standard, at some point it quits making sense to me as you are putting all of this tension on the neck of your instrument when it isn't necessary. I understand some people like thicker gauges, but it will absolutely require a new set up including adjusting the truss rod and intonation. Also, you would want to detune your guitar before you put it up every time because it can't be doing good things for the neck to have that much tension on it just sitting there. I have a friend who used to use 12 - 56 (with a wound 3rd) in standard tuning and he quit because he said it was warping his guitar necks because he was forgetting to detune when he put his guitars up. (Also, as mentioned, your nut grooves may need to be expanded for thicker gauges, etc.)

On the other hand, if you are going to drop tune to C# or lower, or a standard tuning below D standard, then you absolutely need thicker gauges or you are gonna have too much floppiness in your strings.


underlined: correct
bold: bollocks. I have 2 guitars with .12s and 13s on. one is 20 years old and the other 6-10 (i havent dated it). If you have a guitar set up for .13's in E, it is fine for 13's. Your friend is a total mong for not getting his guitar set up for one specific tuning and one specific gauge. You don't set a guitar with .12's in Eb (for example) and then drop tune it and just leave it. It does not work like that. A neck needs a constant amount of tension which is has been set up for. gauge is irrelevant: i could put .13's on a guitar set up for .9's so long as i made the right adjustments.

but it will absolutely require a new set up including adjusting the truss rod and intonation

Well... yeah. If you give the slightest shit about your gear you will get it set up for it.


There are some people in the school of thought that REAL MEN use super thick gauges, etc., but I think that is a bunch of baloney. My prime concerns are that I'm getting good tone, it is comfortable to play, and I'm not damaging my instrument.

No, some people prefer to play on strings, not elastic bands. it's not a case of being a man, it's a case of using common sense and personal preference to choose the gauge you like the most.

EDIT: also, people press on frets and play heavier; SRV used .13's because he played so hard with both hands. He once said that anything thinner and it felt too floppy. He used to go heavier than .13's when his fingers could handle it. Also, he used them because they break so rarely. the number of light gaugestrings than snap so easily is bad - heavy strings last ages.

heavier strings yield better tone.

you wont damage your instrument with heavier strings.
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Last edited by Banjocal at Aug 24, 2011,
#12
Quote by Banjocal
you wont damage your instrument with heavier strings.


If you have heavier strings in standard tuning, lets say 12s or 13s, then you have to have the truss rod tighter because it is fighting more tension from the strings. This is causing the neck to have a higher level of constant pressure than you would have with say 10s or so. My friend isn't the most genius type of guy and so maybe he had a poor set up, he did do the set up himself, so yeah - I think he could only play specific riffs and wasn't ever very serious about guitar. Point being, the laws of physics say you have constant pressure on an object that slowly over time it loses its structural integrity. Maybe I'm wrong in how quickly this would happen, and it may very well depend on the neck wood, etc. as well (I'm sure mahogany and maple handle pressure over time differently), but it will make some difference.

I'm not saying everyone who uses thick gauges are caught up in the whole thing about how macho they are, but there are a lot of people who use thicker gauges who are in that mindframe from my experience.
#13
Quote by katalyzt13
If you have heavier strings in standard tuning, lets say 12s or 13s, then you have to have the truss rod tighter because it is fighting more tension from the strings. This is causing the neck to have a higher level of constant pressure than you would have with say 10s or so. My friend isn't the most genius type of guy and so maybe he had a poor set up, he did do the set up himself, so yeah - I think he could only play specific riffs and wasn't ever very serious about guitar. Point being, the laws of physics say you have constant pressure on an object that slowly over time it loses its structural integrity. Maybe I'm wrong in how quickly this would happen, and it may very well depend on the neck wood, etc. as well (I'm sure mahogany and maple handle pressure over time differently), but it will make some difference.

I'm not saying everyone who uses thick gauges are caught up in the whole thing about how macho they are, but there are a lot of people who use thicker gauges who are in that mindframe from my experience.

Then you need to move to somewhere where people arent idiots.

As for the rest of that...to a point, but a very fine one. Many old jazz guitars used heavy strings, and I still see 50's models and even older. My guitar is a 12 string with 12's on. that's a hell of a lot of pressure. the fact it's still alive after 20 years says that guitars can handle a hell of a lot of stress on the neck: it's better to have constant tension, even if it is high.

part of the issue is that very light gauge strings are now considered standard, and that 11s and heavy. because guitars are setup with 9s and 10s to make it easier for beginners, people think that .12s and above are astonishingly heavy.

that being said, I wouldn't use .12s or heavier on a cheap guitar, as it would be more prone to what you described in the quoted post if the wood was poor. even then, i would wager that a cheap guitar would last 10-15 years just fine with heavy strings.

and your friend didn't know how to properly set up a guitar by the sounds of it. Anyway, I'm off to bed
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#14
Its completely what's comfortable to you - some players use 13-56 for E, whereas others use 10's, whereas others might use 9's. Personally I like 10's, and if I was going into drop D would use a 52 for my bottom string rather than a 46. However, if you plan to play in E and D tuning, I would use 10-52 strings - is playable in E (I used these strings for ages in this tuning), and playable in D, because it combines 10's (generally used in E tuning) and 11's (-52, used in D tuning) If your using a 24.75 scale length guitar though, I would use D'addario 10.5-48, I find the 11, 14, 18 on a traditional set of 11's (11-48 or 59) too thick for me lol
#15
You don't need 12's for E Standard. Put some 10-52's on there, and you'll be golden. E standard is so easy to work with.

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#16
10-52 would be better. You can drop D quite easily with those...but 12s on E standard or Drop D are going to be a bitch.

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#17
Just try some strings for goodness sake.

Seriously, it's like $10 a packet.
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