#1
I've read many reviews on programs, but I'm curious what would be the best choice for guitar recordings specifically and the most user friendly DAW software program? I have absolutely no experience with this kind of stuff and I've never recorded directly to anything before really, I've just used the sound on my video camera for my guitar.

Thanks!
#2
I love reaper. That being said, it depends whether you are just looking for guitar or all types of recording.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#3
Well, I don't know exactly 'what' I'm looking for lol, but I'm just looking for something that is easy to learn how to use and that I can record my own guitar parts and for guitar covers and what not. So just basic stuff I guess.
#4
I would get Reaper to start. It's free, you can decide to buy it later if you want. But it won't you cost you anything to at least try.
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#6
i'm not suggesting this over reaper, but i found FL Studio to be quite user friendly (more so than, say Cubase)
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#7
If you're just starting out, you also need to decide if software is the way you want to go. Buying a multitracker is always a good option for recording novices as you know you've got everything in a single unit - with software not only do you need to decide on the package, you also need to figure out which interfaces you're going to use.

Good quality multitrackers can be bought 2nd hand for not too much money on ebay - obviously that doesn't quite match up to Reaper being free, but you know you've got everything you'll need - some even have built in drum machines and bass programmers!
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#8
yeah the zoom r16 is a great beginner multi track, especially for guitar since its also a processor. but i would check out reaper, theres a book you can get called home recording for beginners by geoffrey francis ( i own it) which will have you using reaper in no time.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#9
Quote by Slapp62
yeah the zoom r16 is a great beginner multi track, especially for guitar since its also a processor. but i would check out reaper, theres a book you can get called home recording for beginners by geoffrey francis ( i own it) which will have you using reaper in no time.

Just one thing to bear in mind - if you decide you want the drum/bass programmer as well, you need to go for the R24, other than that I'd definitely recommend Zoom's R series.
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#10
Quote by vIsIbleNoIsE
i'm not suggesting this over reaper, but i found FL Studio to be quite user friendly (more so than, say Cubase)


I am suggesting FL over reaper even for people who aren't newbies. (Even though it isn't set up like most DAW and some people seem to struggle with it, even though common sense wise I think it makes a lot more sense.
#11
I still don't think multitrack recorders are a good way to start out. You're going to have to learn to use a DAW eventually, so you might as well start off with a cheap interface, like the M-Audio Fasttrack or Lexicon Alpha.

Personally, I use Ableton Live, but it's quite expensive and takes a while to get the hang of. Reaper is good and free.
#12
Reaper is very simple, Intuative program. you create a track with a single click arm it and boom rdy to record. then you can add some pluggins very easily and the editing tools are just as easy to figure out.

and its free. a good way to learn i Say.

Fl studio is easy to, but if youre going to use other DAWS in the future Fl studio migth confuse you Since it works different then most other DAWS. Fl studio work on a loop making structure.
#13
Quote by CrossBack7
I still don't think multitrack recorders are a good way to start out. You're going to have to learn to use a DAW eventually

That's not necessarily true - it comes down to preference at the end of the day. A good multitracker can do just as much for the average home studio setup as software can.

All the main functions provided by software are merely replicating what multitrackers can do, both have advantages, but at the end of the day different people prefer working in different ways.
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#14
Although not the cheapest solution, GarageBand is pretty simple and easy to get started with.
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#15
I find Sonar very intuitive.
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#16
It's not gonna be easy when you first start, every DAW has a learning curve, that's just part of the deal. Nothing in recording is easy. It's work.
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#17
Quote by jcboomer
It's not gonna be easy when you first start, every DAW has a learning curve, that's just part of the deal. Nothing in recording is easy. It's work.


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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChemicalFire
You're plugging an interface into an interface...


Interfaception


Pls tell me what is Interfaception. and how to solve.


#18
Garageband is probably the easiest more "professional" working DAW I've used (not that I'd use it for professional work, just saying that it looks and performs similar to things like Cubase, Logic, ProTools, etc, but in a more user-friendly way). Obviously, if you don't have a Mac (I don't), that one's kind of hard to get without spending a small fortune on a new computer.

Acoustica Mixcraft is probably the closest to Garageband on the PC. I haven't used it much, though I did use Beatcraft for a while. It's quite affordable and comes with a lot of easy to use plugins.

Reaper is probably the best starting point on a PC. It's more complicated than Garageband, but also has the full capabilities of the big name DAWs. If you learn Reaper well enough, you shouldn't have any problem transitioning to Cubase, since they are very similar. ProTools and Sonar/X1 will have a bit more of a learning curve coming from it, but really - Reaper can do everything they can, it just may take a bit longer, or have a different way of getting there. There's never really any reason to ever upgrade from Reaper. It is a professional DAW.

Other than that, Audacity is about as simple as it gets for the PC, but it really can't do much besides recording and rendering. It will allow you to record audio, but it's a very crippled program that I would not suggest to anyone unless you absolutely can't figure out how to use Reaper.
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Last edited by MatrixClaw at Aug 27, 2011,
#19
Cubase is def the least user friendly DAWs

Reaper is prob not what I'd call the most User Friendly but the amount of support you can find for it beats pretty much every other DAW.
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#20
Quote by oneblackened
I find Sonar very intuitive.


I use SONAR and I'll agree.
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#21
Reaper is pretty awesome I actually just got it a few days ago, its nice once you figure out what to do with it although just recording some tracks is pretty simple. add a track>arm>push record and there you go. Ive used audacity before this and reaper pretty much blows away anything audacity could dream of. My teacher actually uses it to record his songs and has for a long time, and thats a guitarist of 15 years so that should tell you something.
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#22
I've been using Reaper - it's my first experience with this type of software. I've found the basics very intuitive. However, I'm still at a loss on being able to do things "smarter", such as take out a bad section and replace it without doing most of the track over. I'm sure that's part of the learning curve and eventually I'll find the answer on some forum to assist me with that.

Reaper is free beyond the trial period, you just have to deal with their splash screen.
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#23
Quote by lmcd
I'm still at a loss on being able to do things "smarter", such as take out a bad section and replace it without doing most of the track over.

You just need to figure out what the tempo of your song is and record to the metronome on it. Then, if there's a section you don't like, just cut it out and record it again, trimming it on both ends to fit within the section, in time. That's a very simple task that will come easier as you become a tighter player.
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#25
Quote by MatrixClaw
You just need to figure out what the tempo of your song is and record to the metronome on it. Then, if there's a section you don't like, just cut it out and record it again, trimming it on both ends to fit within the section, in time. That's a very simple task that will come easier as you become a tighter player.


Thanks for the heads up - I figured it was something like that, I just haven't "cut & paste" in Reaper as yet.

Thanks again~
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#26
Quote by BlueFuzion101
I've read many reviews on programs, but I'm curious what would be the best choice for guitar recordings specifically and the most user friendly DAW software program? I have absolutely no experience with this kind of stuff and I've never recorded directly to anything before really, I've just used the sound on my video camera for my guitar.

Thanks!


See this post about music production software.

http://homestudio-recording.blogspot.com/

#27
i found audacity really easy to use when i started out. after a short time though, it is something you will outgrow. very user friendly, but it is very crippled once you move past just laying down one track at a time.

i found fruity loops really easy to use once i moved to that. there are lots of things that are a bit confusing at first, but any daw is going to have that when you start. havent used any of the recent releases, but i hear that have fixed a lot of the things i had issues with (and renamed it to FL studio). it still has the stigma of being a more beat and electronic oriented daw, but i wouldnt overlook it.

reaper is what i use now. having some experience with other programs (and having tried a bunch of demos) helped a lot with the learning curve, but i do find it fairly straightforward.

that said, just pick a program and go with it. as long as its one of the main ones out there, you should be able to get some online support and find good tutorials. you will have a learning curve with any program, no way to get around it. once you get over the first hump and have the basics, you at least have an idea on how to use most programs (or find what you need). so while some might be slightly easier than others, it isnt a huge life changing decision.
#28
Quote by jof1029

just pick a program and go with it. as long as its one of the main ones out there, you should be able to get some online support and find good tutorials. you will have a learning curve with any program, no way to get around it. once you get over the first hump and have the basics, you at least have an idea on how to use most programs (or find what you need). so while some might be slightly easier than others, it isnt a huge life changing decision.


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