#1
Hey everyone. I need help playing the second arpeggio on the picture below.



I already got down the first one. Finding out the finger positions is hard for me for the second arpeggio. I barre down the two 14s but it doesn't work well when I'm coming back to the 12 on the low E since I'm working on my sweeps.

Also, do you guys have any other arpeggio recommendations? I'm sort of a beginner to sweeping but I'm also working on two 5 string sweeps that were taught to me a few months ago.
#2
Barring the 14'sis about half right. You really need to role your finger over those two frets in order to play one note clean and mute the unwanted one. It is hard to describe via internet. Just search on youtube there you should find some.. easier explanations.
#3
Just do a lot of sweeping and in time it might get better (it can take some time, but don't be to hasty, don't try to hurry). The best thing would be to try to practise it without a metronome and just play it up and down at a speed where everything sounds clear. Just do this for a long time and eventually your fingers will know what they need to do.

As far as recommendations go, you should look for triadic minor and major arpeggios on google or somwhere and practise those. And if you want some finger twisters/long execises, just slowly practise arpeggio runs from Jason Becker's songs Altitudes and Serrana and in time you'll get a lot of benefit from it.
#4
Write your own arpeggios. It's essentially the same gimmick involved in chord construction, and will benefit you monumentally in the long run when you're learning to build maj9add13s and obscure chords you'd never think of putting in your music later on. Don't take the lazy route and look up patterns - learn the notes and the theory and you can make some elaborate economy arpeggios to complement sweeps on top of some practical application of chord construction alongside a skill that's ridiculously overrated. That's not to say 'Don't learn songs with sweeping in them' - Sequoia Throne infinitely improved my application of sweeps - but don't sit and run up and down shapes you found on ss.org or here.


When it comes to getting cleaner at sweeping, just do it as slow as possible until your fingers get the point. It will probably take a very, very long time. You'll need to practice on clean settings and distorted settings on your amp. Gain can cover up general mistakes, and lack of gain can cover up muting errors.
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Last edited by Hail at Aug 25, 2011,
#5
@Hail
I think it's too early to ask from a beginner to learn advanced arpeggios if he hasn't even tamed the technique itself. But it's a good advice for the future.
#6
Quote by Hail
Write your own arpeggios. It's essentially the same gimmick involved in chord construction, and will benefit you monumentally in the long run when you're learning to build maj9add13s and obscure chords you'd never think of putting in your music later on. Don't take the lazy route and look up patterns - learn the notes and the theory and you can make some elaborate economy arpeggios to complement sweeps on top of some practical application of chord construction alongside a skill that's ridiculously overrated. That's not to say 'Don't learn songs with sweeping in them' - Sequoia Throne infinitely improved my application of sweeps - but don't sit and run up and down shapes you found on ss.org or here.


When it comes to getting cleaner at sweeping, just do it as slow as possible until your fingers get the point. It will probably take a very, very long time. You'll need to practice on clean settings and distorted settings on your amp. Gain can cover up general mistakes, and lack of gain can cover up muting errors.


I don't know a lot of theory so I have no idea how to write my own arpeggios. Also, how long did it take you to get the Sequioa Throne sweeps done?
#7
Quote by xShade
I don't know a lot of theory so I have no idea how to write my own arpeggios. Also, how long did it take you to get the Sequioa Throne sweeps done?


Yeah, I'm not saying 'tomorrow get a theory book and get cracking', just saying long-term it would benefit you a lot to learn how to make them.

The Sequoia Throne sweeps, fortunately, were after I had sat with the technique for a while so it only took a couple days, but if you approach it very slowly you can easily start off learning the sweeps and piecing them together practically while learning the technique itself. I spent far too much time going up and down C major shapes and such without a point, and it's really fulfilling when you finally get that lick up to speed and can hear how great sweeps can sound in context.
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#8
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@Hail
I think it's too early to ask from a beginner to learn advanced arpeggios if he hasn't even tamed the technique itself. But it's a good advice for the future.


I would say that someone should learn how to construct arpeggios before learning to sweep; arpeggio construction is a basic theoretical skill whereas sweeping is a very advanced technique. The technique is secondary to the ideas you express with it so why should you not have the ideas first and then the technique to express them with? This applies double for this as sweeping is only one method of playing arpeggios anyway, not that sweeping is exclusively a triad-arpeggio skill either.
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