#1
I just downloaded Audacity to start playing around with some recordings. Once I get the hang of it/have enough time/get new computer/get enough money I'll probably buy some better quality recording software. Anyways that's besides the point.

I just recorded a few guitar tracks just with my laptop's microphone, and the sound is really fuzzy. I kinda expected it to be like that, so it's no big deal. I was wondering if I get a Behringer UCA222 and run my guitar->amp->UCA222->laptop will the sound be less fuzzy and a more accurate recording of what my amp sounds like? If not, do you know what products would help me out?


Cheers
Gear:

Schecter Omen-6
Custom-built explorer (my first build)
Schecter Damian-6
Two strat copies
Home-made PitBull Guitars Flying V
Blackstar HT-1RH
Blackstar HT-Metal
Dunlop KH95 Wah
#2
If you're using software to record with, you'll need an interface to connect your instruments to the PC. The standard mic input on a laptop does not do the job.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
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My SoundCloud
#3
Quote by GaryBillington
If you're using software to record with, you'll need an interface to connect your instruments to the PC. The standard mic input on a laptop does not do the job.



Such as???
Sorry, I'm a complete newbie in this area
Gear:

Schecter Omen-6
Custom-built explorer (my first build)
Schecter Damian-6
Two strat copies
Home-made PitBull Guitars Flying V
Blackstar HT-1RH
Blackstar HT-Metal
Dunlop KH95 Wah
#5
^^ an interface like that would do the trick.

For a complete newbie it can be less confusing to start off with a multitracker instead of trying to get software & interfaces working together. They can be purchased cheaply 2nd hand from eBay etc. and provide the full solution in a single unit, however if you already have some software and want to stick with it the interface is definitely required.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#6
Hmmm okay. Looks like some more research and spending is in order.

Thanks alot for the tips. Really appreciate it
Gear:

Schecter Omen-6
Custom-built explorer (my first build)
Schecter Damian-6
Two strat copies
Home-made PitBull Guitars Flying V
Blackstar HT-1RH
Blackstar HT-Metal
Dunlop KH95 Wah
#7
but, it won't be easier if you buy an amp mic, conncect it to the laptop and record with it? :-?
#8
Always make sure you do plenty of research before committing to anything. Here are a few things you should consider:

1 - Do you have sole access to your PC, or is it shared by other people in the house? If it's shared, you may not always be able to use it when you need it.

2 - If it is just a standard laptop purchased for everyday use, it may not have the processing power or a good enough soundcard for recording so these may need to be upgraded if you want to get the full benefits of it. The system requirements for your software should be available at the site you downloaded/purchased it from.

3 - If you choose to go with a multitracker, make sure you get one with enough tracks. I'd definitely recommend against buying a 4-track, and even 8 tracks can seem like loads when you first start but they are quickly filled once you get into the swing of things.

4 - Do you know how you're going to be creating the drums & bass tracks? If you choose software there will be packages available which can do this for you, but it's an additional expense you may not have considered. If you choose a multitracker, some (but not all) have drum machines and bass synthesizers built in.

If any other questions crop up while you're researching which way to go, keep posting here. Even if people don't know a definitive answer, there'll be lots of opinions for you to consider when making your decision.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#9
+1 to the guy above, valid points. 8 tracks is really not much because you will keep 7/8 for bouncing the mixed song on to.

I have a poor laptop, so I bought a used Fostex MR8 MkII from the evil bay, and I use that for all my recording needs. Very simple to use and very portable. Then when I'm done recording I hook it up to the laptop, take all the files and mix them, eq them and add compression and any other effects in Reaper.

I use a SM57 clone, a SM58 clone and a cheapy Behringer preamp directly into the multi tracker, it is cheap and chearful gear, but the sound quality is OKish when considering the outlay.
Last edited by ragingben at Aug 25, 2011,
#10
@ragingben - I used to have a Fostex 8 track as well, it served me well. Most of the songs on my profile were recording with it. Keeping tracks 7&8 for bouncing is a unique 'feature' of Fostex recorders though, a lot of the other manufacturers provide a dedicated track for bouncing & mastering.
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
#12
Yep - that's one of the reasons I upgraded to a 16 track!

Have to admit though, the effects & mastering etc were better on my old Fostex than the Yamaha I upgraded to, and the Fostex was also easier to use.

EDIT - there are even some 8 tracks out there which include drum machines & bass synthesizers and provide additional tracks for them, so you effectively get a 10 track!
Gibson LP Traditional, LP GT, LP Studio, SG Standard x2
Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm >TC Polytune > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
EVH 5150 III LBXII
Jet City JCA22H
.
My SoundCloud
Last edited by GaryBillington at Aug 25, 2011,
#13
or just use a cheap field recorder with removable sd card and record ur amp. much cheaper solution.
just paste the audio files to the tracks in audacity. thats what i used to do before i got a macbook pro with logic express
#14
Quote by GaryBillington
Yep - that's one of the reasons I upgraded to a 16 track!

Have to admit though, the effects & mastering etc were better on my old Fostex than the Yamaha I upgraded to, and the Fostex was also easier to use.

EDIT - there are even some 8 tracks out there which include drum machines & bass synthesizers and provide additional tracks for them, so you effectively get a 10 track!


i have a Zoom digital 8-track with the features mentioned. the drums have their own stereo track plus you can add more on one of the open tracks if desired. there is also a seperate mastering stereo track so you can use all 8 tracks for recording. tracks 5/6 and 7/8 are stereo pairs that you can bounce stuff off of the first 4 tracks to. the inclused drum tracks are pretty decent and if you want you can program the drums from scratch (haven't take the time to do that yet.) there is a bass that can be programed as well ( iplay real bass on my songs) the unit also has some built in fx and a couple of amp models as well. i use my POD for this but you can use the unit and nothing else if needed. my results can be found in my profile

to OP turn your gain down. you'll find when recording regardless of method used that you will need less distortion than you think to get the sound you want. just slapping a mic up in front of your amp set how you do normally will result in a fuzzy sound.