#1
I've been playing a little over a year now *cough*15months*cough*, and the first thing I learned was tremolo picking, from there I began just playing Slayer and Metallica stuff (Old Metallica, mind you, with the 9000 open E's), so basically I have spent my whole guitar-life playing Thrash Metal. Well, I'm just plain tired of playing Thrash. I'm sick of every riff being 32 E's followed by a little fill/tail. I'm tired of playing music that really is just brutal on the ears. Yeah I love Thrash, and it was my main influence when I picked up the Guitar, but I also like other styles of Rock/Metal and now I find it extremely difficult to come up with anything that isn't just some fast shreddy riff.

I've turned the Distortion off on my amp, and even play the guitar unplugged to try and force my mind to think "Okay, it's not even Electric, so thrash wouldn't even sound good like this", but it's not really working.

The music I like, and would like to play/make, is stuff like Staind, Cold, Breaking Benjamin, Default, basically the Post-Grunge/Grunge/Modern Hard Rock kinda stuff. I learned a few Chords that weren't Power Chords, but they're just the Open chords (Yeah, I had no clue what those were until a few weeks ago). I picked up a few interesting ones from "Utopia" by Within Temptation, and I learned the entire song "Outside" by Staind, hoping that by playing songs I like, that are the style I wanna play, I'd see how those guitarists did it, and learn from it.

I ran into an issue though: Since up until now, I haven't been doing chords other than Power Chords, I have absolutely no idea how to play with the more complicated chords. Outside was easy in the Verse/Intro since it's just the power chord shapes with one finger barred across all 6 strings, but the chorus took me a while because I had never played chords that weren't just the Power Chord or Bar Chord form (I consider Drop tuned power chords to be Bar chords).

So all that aside, I'll just state what I'd like help with!
I need some songs that are slow-moderate speed (Think when you were a beginner, and guestimate how fast that would be), without a lot of difficult chord changes. Basically some beginner songs to get my fingers in shape. Maybe just some chords that are easy to learn as a beginner?
I don't know them by names, so if you suggest them by name I wont know what you're talking about; I learn things by Tab, not by the musical note (YEs I know I need to fix this -_-').
#2
I don't really listen to the bands you're hoping to leanr songs by so I can't make any suggestions there, but I would say the best thing you could do is buy an acoustic guitar and start playing that.

That will be the biggest thing you could do to improve your playing style, it will also force you to improve your technique for playing full chords much more than just playing them on a clean sounding electric will.
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#3
Okay, I will get a LOT of hate for this, but...

if you want to massively expand your chord knowledge (and subsequently rhythm playing a bit too) learn jazz standards.
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#4
just go ahead and learn the songs of those bands. it will give you an idea of what chord progressions are being used, song structures, rhythms and melody. just try playing their stuff, expand your knowledge on some chords (like, barre chords at least) and you'll get along fairly quick.
#5
Learn your open chords (A, C, D, E, G)--both major and minor shapes. Then learn barre chords, first A- and E-shape; once you've mastered those, move on to C- and G-shape barres.

While you're doing this, I'd recommend working on a lot of pop songs. I know that to a metal guy like you, they're nails on a chalkboard (they still do that to me), but they're very simple and great for working on chords. Pretty much anything by Oasis is a good start; plus, it might help you get laid.

Also, seriously learn the major scale (after chords, of course). Music theory is incredibly helpful and I regret not learning it earlier, especially sight-reading (yes, I know that's not technically theory, but it is most common among properly trained guitarists).

Finally, don't be afraid to radically change styles. For the longest time, I was strictly a hard rock player, but two years in, I hit the wall. So I took the advice of many a UGer and started learning country and blues--a similar family, but different enough to shake things up. It really does help.
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try the sexolydian scale.
#6
I have an idea for you
go to this website: http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/guitar_scales.php
then pick a scale and the key you want to play it in
and then when the entire scale map is in front of you literally sit down and make all the "shapes" you can by using the scale map as your guide. You can come up with tons of different sounds like this.

For example, on the E minor scale instead of just playing something like a Gmaj chord and then an Em chord, I would create a shape out of the scale ( 324xxx)( EADGBe) and play this three note chord. This is one of the shapes I came up with just by trying all kinds of different fingering positions from the scale map. Then you can take this shape (324xxx) and slide it up the neck and land on (879xxx). Its the same shape but different notes so its starting to become a melody. This is a small step to give you ideas on how to discover chords or randoms groups of notes you have never played before.
Last edited by crispykids at Aug 31, 2011,
#7
good!

I'm not going to attack your taste in music but yea.. its rough on the ears some time.

You like Alice in Chains? They can hit it pretty hard, but they also have some very simple songs.

Im a new player... probably been playing electric as long as you have and acoustic maybe a little more. I think one of the things that REALLY helped my development is my equipment. Im all about electric these days and thats the instrument that inspires me, but I have found practicing the scales and chords on the acoustic really helps and translates to electric. Especially if you want to slow things down and work on fundamentals and theory. Switching equipment or trying new (if you can afford) has really help keep my juices going.

for example...
yesterday I was practicing my favorite scale on the acoustic in my son's room. He was chilling playing legos. I was playing guitar watching his fish tank. I was practicing my favorite scale, the pentatonic + a note. Since I was on the acoustic I was just playing the Em pent + C (I call it the Hey Joe scale). Then I started making as many chords as I could with those notes and practiced the scale or variations of it between scales. Pretty soon I had a good groove going. It was like Em, Cadd9/G with some simple riffs in there.

Doing this I accomplished:
something new on guitar out of my normal practice routines
practiced scales and chords and music theory
hung out with my kid. Granted.. he was in his own world and me in mine but it was great. I built a riff, he built a ship capable of both light assault missions and recon

Life is good.

I would try to pick up an cheap acoustic. Sometimes easier said then done but I really get a lot from it.
he of tranquil mind
#8
Well you know considering you've spent over a year learning all these thrash songs the influence wont really go away. But that's actually a good thing, since you've now moved on, just learn the songs of your new favourite bands and you'll be well on your way to be making riffs like them but also like the thrash you were influenced by (this is the cool thing about learning lots of different types of genres because you mix a bunch of different artists together into one and you get something completely unique and awesome, well sometimes, and other times it just sucks ass but yeah stay optomistic). Keep in mind none of your favourite artists got their own sound by listening to one just one genre, they got it by combining things about different bands that they like across the genre spectrum. So considering it a blessing that you've got thrash down and you now want to move onto different types of music. This means you will have the best of both worlds to incorporate into your playing.

Anyway the point im making is dont try to push thrash away now that you like other music, simply combine everything you've been influenced by and hope for the best when making your own stuff!


PS. you dont NEED to know how to read music to be a good guitar player/learn theory (two sides of the blade, you dont need it but what doesnt hurt you only makes you stronger). I know a fair amount of theory but i barely know how to read music, i also make tons of songs and have no problems getting my ideas out onto my guitar and have never been in a position where i needed to read music so thats just me but if you really think its a problem or you need it for something then learn it.
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Last edited by !Mike! at Aug 31, 2011,
#9
Honestly, the best thing to have happen here is for you to pick a song that you really like, commit to learning to play it, and go from there.

Your style will adjust over time as you get comfortable with more stuff.
#10
"Change your playing style"? How about rather expanding it - making yourself more versatile.

Go forth, therefore, to the land of Open Chords and Barre Chords and become familiar with the territory: major, major 7th, minor, minor 7th, dominant 7th - those are what people usually start off learning (or I did in any case). The best way to do this is to learn songs with open chords. So check out Staind: the tattooed acoustic man sitting in his chair having a drink and a smoke hehe. Also, Nirvana (I'm pretty sure) make use of open chords, power chords and lead picking - that may be good to take a look at. There is much more to guitar than the power chords - stuff with waaaay more color in them.
Also, at the same time, try to maintain what you've learned from playing thrash metal, knowing lots of different things will only make you a more versatile musician and guitarist in the end.
#11
Quote by JMKAM
I've been playing a little over a year now *cough*15months*cough*, and the first thing I learned was tremolo picking, from there I began just playing Slayer and Metallica stuff (Old Metallica, mind you, with the 9000 open E's), so basically I have spent my whole guitar-life playing Thrash Metal. Well, I'm just plain tired of playing Thrash. I'm sick of every riff being 32 E's followed by a little fill/tail. I'm tired of playing music that really is just brutal on the ears. Yeah I love Thrash, and it was my main influence when I picked up the Guitar, but I also like other styles of Rock/Metal and now I find it extremely difficult to come up with anything that isn't just some fast shreddy riff.

I've turned the Distortion off on my amp, and even play the guitar unplugged to try and force my mind to think "Okay, it's not even Electric, so thrash wouldn't even sound good like this", but it's not really working.

The music I like, and would like to play/make, is stuff like Staind, Cold, Breaking Benjamin, Default, basically the Post-Grunge/Grunge/Modern Hard Rock kinda stuff. I learned a few Chords that weren't Power Chords, but they're just the Open chords (Yeah, I had no clue what those were until a few weeks ago). I picked up a few interesting ones from "Utopia" by Within Temptation, and I learned the entire song "Outside" by Staind, hoping that by playing songs I like, that are the style I wanna play, I'd see how those guitarists did it, and learn from it.

I ran into an issue though: Since up until now, I haven't been doing chords other than Power Chords, I have absolutely no idea how to play with the more complicated chords. Outside was easy in the Verse/Intro since it's just the power chord shapes with one finger barred across all 6 strings, but the chorus took me a while because I had never played chords that weren't just the Power Chord or Bar Chord form (I consider Drop tuned power chords to be Bar chords).

So all that aside, I'll just state what I'd like help with!
I need some songs that are slow-moderate speed (Think when you were a beginner, and guestimate how fast that would be), without a lot of difficult chord changes. Basically some beginner songs to get my fingers in shape. Maybe just some chords that are easy to learn as a beginner?
I don't know them by names, so if you suggest them by name I wont know what you're talking about; I learn things by Tab, not by the musical note (YEs I know I need to fix this -_-').



Learn some Veil of Maya, maybe you'll change your mind
#12
Quote by Banjocal
Okay, I will get a LOT of hate for this, but...

if you want to massively expand your chord knowledge (and subsequently rhythm playing a bit too) learn jazz standards.

This.

Jazz is probably the most beneficial genre to learn. And probably the hardest and from the outside looking in, the most boring.